Thank you very much for your exceptionally informative guide. It provides excellent detail around the composition of soccer balls, different types of balls on the market, and what balls appear to be the best on the market in each category. A really useful website that I have bookmarked for consideration when I am next in the market for a new soccer ball (which will be soon as my old champions league ball from several years ago is getting a bit tatty!)
Kelsey is a wife and work from home mommy of two beautiful children. A former medical assistant, Kelsey now focuses on writing and reviewing products to help other work from home mom and dads lives a little easier. She has passion for technology and learning, If you ask Kelsey, the words "A type" and "organized" wouldn’t even begin to describe her.
As an avid soccer player and coach, I know it is important to have a suitable ball. First off, this ball arrived fully inflated, which is always a plus. This way I don't have to run around trying to find a pump and needle in order to inflate it. My toddler immediately started kicking it around the house once I was able to get it out of the package! I also love the feel of this ball. It is easy to grip and allows for easy ball handling. The colors are perfect, too. It is a little boring to play with a ball whose colors are dull or faded. The contrast between the blue and electric yellow is perfect. The colors make the ball easy to see.
If you are unsure of which size to get your child, I will recommend what size I think based off real-world use. The size 3 is good for any child until about first grade or second grade, which is when a child should move into a size 4. The size 4 should last until they get to middle school (around 6th or 7th grade), and then they would move into the adult official size 5.

I bought three and used them for juggling, shooting practice and kicking against a wall. I juggled 90,000 times in 3 months, and shot many times on goal and kicked against walls. These are very durable. I look for durability in practice balls and these are superb. I wonder if Wilson has the newer cover pattern with the same internal structure in any model of ball. It would be wise to do that for the sake of staying current. I love the feel when kicking. Variable amounts of air can be used based on personal preference while practicing. A little less air allows a more forgiving bounce while juggling.


 I’ll be honest right out of the gate in saying that I don’t have any experience with Senda.  But after looking at this ball, I will have to try one out soon!  Senda brings a very classic look to its ball, giving you a throwback to days gone by.  It has 32 panels and claims that it can be used outdoors, indoors, and on turf.  It is hand stitched with premium leather and has four layers of hybrid polyester and cotton linings between the cover and the bladder to help it last longer.  It is NHFS approved with its latex bladder, so it would be great for use in high school matches.  And especially considering it’s low cost.
Whereas plenty of manufacturers that we reviewed opted to go with a soccer ball that was more durable than responsive, Mikasa takes the opposite approach and focuses primarily on the touch that their ball can provide. This is most apparent in the soccer ball’s choice of casing material. The synthetic leather casing of the Mikasa is by far the softest and naturally responsive-without the inclusion of texture-out of any other soccer ball we reviewed.
Today's footballs are more complex than past footballs. Most modern footballs consist of twelve regular pentagonal and twenty regular hexagonal panels positioned in a truncated icosahedron spherical geometry.[4] Some premium-grade 32-panel balls use non-regular polygons to give a closer approximation to sphericality.[12] The inside of the football is made up of a latex bladder which enables the football to be pressurised. The ball's panel pairs are stitched along the edge; this procedure can either be performed manually or with a machine.[5] The size of a football is roughly 22 cm (8.65 inches) in diameter for a regulation size 5 ball. Rules state that a size 5 ball must be 68 to 70 cm in circumference. Averaging that to 69 cm and then dividing by π gives about 22 cm for a diameter.

This is the 4th one we've ordered! This is a tough ball that glows very brightly at night and comes with an extra battery, but we haven't had to change batteries after 2 summers of playing with it. Whenever my kids brought it out during our outdoor, night-time, community concerts, all the kids wanted to play with it and tons of parents came up to get the information on where to get it. I had originally ordered it so that my son could still see the ball at the end of his fall soccer practices, since they play on a field without lights. Now it is the favorite birthday present to give to all of my kids' friends (ages 7 and 11).
In the year 1863, the first specifications for footballs were laid down by the Football Association. Previous to this, footballs were made out of inflated leather, with later leather coverings to help footballs maintain their shapes.[3] In 1872 the specifications were revised, and these rules have been left essentially unchanged as defined by the International Football Association Board. Differences in footballs created since this rule came into effect have been to do with the material used in their creation.
Latex bladders are one of the best materials when it comes to ball construction. However, with latex bladders, air won’t last as long as butyl bladders and will need more attention for proper inflation. Butyl-blend bladders hold in the air much better, but they are harder and less receptive in play. Mid-priced balls will usually have a mix of butyl and rubber.

These balls were add on items and they were a great price. I got four of them because I started coaching U8 soccer. I didn’t want to spend a lot of money on balls let me get ruined or actually find their way home with one of my players, these were a perfect fit. We are only halfway through the season and they’ve held up great, they’ve even used them as the game ball on a couple occasions. I would recommend this to any soccer coach.
This is what the majority of quality soccer balls are made out of. It offers a great blend of durability and responsiveness and is the material most commonly used by professional leagues for their game balls. In fact, FIFA uses polyurethane, or PU, exclusively for their game balls. One thing that allows PU to stand out above many of the other materials is its versatility.
I got this as a gift for my son. He enjoys soccer and he can play till the sun goes down because he can no longer see the soccer ball. When i found this I was so excited that he'd be able to play soccer at night. When I received it, I followed the direction about removing the plastic and the tube with the batteries. It was so difficult putting that plastic back into the ball. The light worked after I replaced the batteries as instructed. When my son received it the light worked. He put the ball away to use at night, but night came and the light no longer turned on. What a disappointment .
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Latex bladders are used in high-quality balls. These kind of bladders are soft and provide good feeling. They offer better response and bounce than Butyl bladders, but the downside of this kind of bladder is they don’t hold the air for too long. As a result, they require filling more frequently. Air escapes due to micropores on the cover, but nowadays some balls are constructed with carbon latex bladder to help to close these micropores. As a result, the balls can hold air for a longer period.
Yesterday’s balls had stitches and seams in them like American footballs have!  They slowly transitioned away from that to the classic black and white soccer ball.  From there, we saw the invention of panels.  And finally today, we are left with the maneuverability of multi-panels and other technologies which allow the ball to fly quicker, bend more, and dip harder.  In addition to these changes, another simple fact that should be noted is that the fact has become softer over time.  This allows players to be able to kick the ball further and not risk injury.
With 32 machine stitched panels, the American Challenge Brasilia comes together to create a soccer ball that has a beautiful, shiny outer casing. 4 color choices include Lemon, Lime, Orange, and Raspberry. The design on each ball is elegant without being distracting, and its surface is resistant to scrapes and scratches that ruin the aesthetic appeal.

If you're headed to the park to play a quick pickup game, brightly colored adidas soccer balls can help make it easy to distinguish your match from other games that might be being played nearby. Dribbling skills conducted with mini Nike soccer balls can hone your control skills, so you can glide past defenders with ease. Look for 12-panel soccer balls that provide a true, accurate flight with each strike, and rubber butyl bladders that offer excellent shape and air retention, so you can quickly jump into a game without looking for a pump. If you prefer playing indoors, check out a futsal ball that's slightly smaller than regulation soccer balls and is designed for use on hard indoor courts.


What size soccer ball should I buy? The first step in purchasing soccer balls is determining the proper size(s) to buy. Many soccer leagues have different size requirements, so be sure to check with your coach or organization to find out which size ball to buy. Soccer balls for match use come in three different sizes which range from size 3 to size 5. For more information on soccer ball sizes, click here.
Thank you very much for your exceptionally informative guide. It provides excellent detail around the composition of soccer balls, different types of balls on the market, and what balls appear to be the best on the market in each category. A really useful website that I have bookmarked for consideration when I am next in the market for a new soccer ball (which will be soon as my old champions league ball from several years ago is getting a bit tatty!)
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