This size five blue soccer ball is an updated classic ball with a traditional 32-panel machine stitched design and a fun, colorful look. It is a great soccer ball for training and comes with a long-lasting air retention bladder that helps reduce deflation. The Pro Trainer new soccer ball has a durable cover with counter balanced graphics. Franklin Sports is a reputable company with years of experience making the best soccer equipment, and you’ll undoubtedly want to purchase one of their soccer balls if you want to train and play like a pro.

The highest in cost, top match balls for elite soccer players are constructed with a supreme quality cover, backing, and bladder for the most predictable flight pattern and striking ability. Some of the most impressive official match balls on the field are made with the threadless, seamless, beveled edge (TSBE) technology which provides a seamless surface for touch and less water uptake to stay in control. adidas soccer balls that pass a demanding series of tests, set by FIFA, on the shape, weight, performance, rebound and water absorption have the highest ranking a soccer ball can get. Most adidas training and pro match balls are FIFA approved so you can lead the charge down the pitch.


Wilson is a classic sports company that gives you just about everything that you need in a soccer ball. This ball has a synthetic leather cover which is soft to the kick, but also has enhanced ball durability. It has a butyl rubber bladder to hold the air which gives the ball its shape and and retains the air. This has the classic black and white panel colors.
What size soccer ball should I buy? The first step in purchasing soccer balls is determining the proper size(s) to buy. Many soccer leagues have different size requirements, so be sure to check with your coach or organization to find out which size ball to buy. Soccer balls for match use come in three different sizes which range from size 3 to size 5. For more information on soccer ball sizes, click here.
However, this has not stopped players from preferring butyl as their bladder material of choice. In fact, this preference is so well cemented by players of all skill sets, that manufacturers professional game balls are just as likely to use butyl bladders as they are latex often times even more likely. It is interesting to note that butyl is more durable than latex but less durable than rubber-despite providing had better air retention.
 I’ll be honest right out of the gate in saying that I don’t have any experience with Senda.  But after looking at this ball, I will have to try one out soon!  Senda brings a very classic look to its ball, giving you a throwback to days gone by.  It has 32 panels and claims that it can be used outdoors, indoors, and on turf.  It is hand stitched with premium leather and has four layers of hybrid polyester and cotton linings between the cover and the bladder to help it last longer.  It is NHFS approved with its latex bladder, so it would be great for use in high school matches.  And especially considering it’s low cost.
We covered the quality in small detail above, but we’ll look into a little further here.  The quality of the ball you pick is very important.  If you want exactly what the pros play with, then you will have to pay a little more as a result of picking the premium choice. Those balls fly better and more true than their counterparts, but they are not meant to be practiced with on a regular basis.  Premium balls tend to have a softer impact on both your cleats and ankle guards to allow for more ball control and handling.  After the “premium” match ball category is the “match ball” category.  These aren’t nearly as expensive as the premiums are, but are still very good in match situations.  These aren’t meant for practice, but they typically can hold up for extended periods of time, possibly a season or two.  The third type is “training balls.”  These balls are meant for training and practice, and they can be used continuously without doing damage to it.  I have some great training balls that have lasted upwards of six years!  The quality of training balls has gone up drastically over the years that I have been playing.  When I was younger, some of them were so hard that you’d feel like your foot was broken after kicking them.  Nowadays, they literally feel like a premium ball with their softness and their flight.  So, almost any ball is great nowadays from the right supplier!
Yesterday’s balls had stitches and seams in them like American footballs have!  They slowly transitioned away from that to the classic black and white soccer ball.  From there, we saw the invention of panels.  And finally today, we are left with the maneuverability of multi-panels and other technologies which allow the ball to fly quicker, bend more, and dip harder.  In addition to these changes, another simple fact that should be noted is that the fact has become softer over time.  This allows players to be able to kick the ball further and not risk injury.
On the other hand, replicas (sometimes called training balls or gliders) are designed to be just like the official match balls but are much cheaper. Their panels are often stitched rather than thermally-bonded and are made of a different material. However, they’re not necessarily less durable than official match balls. So, they’re the recommended option for most players.
This is by far the best ball for younger soccer players. I've had this ball for just under a week now, and I'm already seeing improvement in my knuckles. This ball, similarly to official match balls, has thermally fused panels, and doesn't absorb water. It also glides nicely in the air. It has a GREAT texture, and is fun to practice footwork and freestyling with, in addition to shooting. I looked for weeks to find an affordable match ball, and when I found this, I was thrilled! I am sort of a soccer nerd, and I spend much of my free time looking at cleats, balls, and shooting techniques, so I sort of know what I'm talking about, and I highly recommend this ball to anyone looking to improve their shooting skills, or anyone who simply wants an affordable match ball to use.

Early footballs began as animal bladders or stomachs that would easily fall apart if kicked too much. Improvements became possible in the 19th century with the introduction of rubber and discoveries of vulcanization by Charles Goodyear. The modern 32-panel ball design was developed in 1962 by Eigil Nielsen, and technological research continues today to develop footballs with improved performance. The 32-panel ball design was soon overcome by 24-panel balls as well as 42-panel balls, both of which improved performance compared to before, in 2007.[citation needed]


Size 5 is the official size for professional matches. Therefore, this ball is only available in this size. Do not use this soccer ball on concreted areas. Its unique rubber uses Puma Airlock Valve Technology (PAL) in order to facilitate proper airlock technology. This ball features Perimeter Balance Technology (PBT) which enables it to maintain impressive flight characteristics.
I purchased the Knuckle It Pro soccer ball for my sons 12 th birthday in August of 2017. When I asked what he would like for his birthday he had mentioned this ball. I had never heard of it so I began doing research on the product. We had at least 4 soccer balls at home at the time so I wasn't sure I'd go with another ball. We have one of nearly every major brand ranging in price from $15-30. He had even received a $40 ball just months before for Christmas so I really didn't see the point in one more.
If you are all about playing soccer competitively or recreationally, you know how important it is that you have a great game ball for play. The thing is, buying a quality soccer ball can get really expensive, and it can be difficult to find a great soccer ball for a great price. So where do you start looking for finding a good soccer ball for a low price?
It is also a good idea to clean your soccer ball after you have finished using it. Although regularly cleaning a soccer ball can be a time-consuming chore, it will extend the life of the ball’s cover. The grit, dirt, and debris that the ball can pick up on any pitch impacts the panels and stitching with every rotation. So clean it thoroughly and then allow it to dry for the best possible results.
Adidas says its design was motivated by Russia's urban landscapes. It uses textured graphics and a metallic sheen to bring a modern look to the classic design. The ball is made of six panels of thermally bonded TPU and about 15% silicone. The materials allow for better trajectory, accuracy, responsiveness, and low water absorption. It also feels well-padded and slightly lighter than previous match balls.
×