After reading this article, I would like to start off with saying this definitely covers 99% of what you need to know about soccer balls. As a 7 year previous soccer player, I played between both defense and forward positions… both of which are very active positions during a game. That being said, for someone like me that is very knowledgeable with anything related to soccer, I would recommend this article to anyone that needed in-depth information based on the #1 point of interest related to soccer, the soccer ball. For anyone curious or new to soccer, the ball is the first thing you should learn about. This article will no doubt help you on what type of soccer best suits you and makes it very clear and simple. Bottom line, this article receives an A+ from me with everything covering all the different types of soccer balls.
When it is about quality, these are almost same as premium match soccer balls but obviously not the same. To be exact, you can say official match soccer balls are positioning between premium match balls and training soccer balls regarding quality. That means these balls also offer an excellent level of air retention, shape, water absorption, curve, and performance. Although usually, they are not as durable as training balls but as a whole, they are very much durable.

Thank you very much for your exceptionally informative guide. It provides excellent detail around the composition of soccer balls, different types of balls on the market, and what balls appear to be the best on the market in each category. A really useful website that I have bookmarked for consideration when I am next in the market for a new soccer ball (which will be soon as my old champions league ball from several years ago is getting a bit tatty!)
It depends on its intended use. Soccer ball casings are made from three kinds of synthetic materials. Polyvinyl carbonate (PVC) which is what most less expensive training balls are made from, Polyurethane (PU) which is the preferred ball for soccer tournaments, and a combination of the two. There are also foam and rubber training soccer balls for kids. Some kids' soccer balls are made of 100 percent thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU), which is a kind of foamy casing material so the ball is very soft. There are greater and lesser grades of each kind of material. PU-covered balls are generally softer, livelier, and have a better feel to them, and are what most people seek when looking for a optimal performing soccer ball.
Differing from competing balls that utilize plastic, the deluxe cushioned cover of the Mikasa Serious Soccer Ball is made of synthetic leather. This soft, durable material is exponentially easier on the shins and foreheads of players used to batting the ball around regularly. The leather is forgiving in its impact, allowing passes and shooting to be crisper off of the athlete’s foot.
Outside of PU and TPU, pretty much every other material used for a soccer ball’s casing will be specialized for either durability or responsiveness. When it comes to synthetic leather, the focus is also exclusively on responsiveness and this is by far the most responsive material used for a soccer ball’s casing. It is important to note that PU, TPU, and PVC are all often labeled as synthetic leather.
Despite having so many good reviews from the users, why aren’t we keeping Wilson traditional ball on our list? It is because we strongly think Wilson is specialized in making tennis equipment. On the other hand, this model did not meet our expectation. This model seems too heavy to us, and overall feel was not too good. That is why we are not recommending you to go for this option. But obviously, the final decision is yours. So many people are still buying this 🙂
This particular indoor ball has all the qualities that make it ideal for an indoor soccer ball. The exterior uses a soft felt material. The panels of this size 5 indoor ball are hand stitched which makes it more durable than machine stitched panels. Its bounce is not too high which sits well with the requirements of an indoor soccer ball. It is not too bouncy or light but it flies rather well when kicked. This gives the player ample control during a session. It has a comfortable texture that’s pleasant to hold, for a goalkeeper and comfortable for footwork especially if the player is barefooted. Has a bright color that makes it visible during a game. Players can easily keep track of it, especially in an indoor setting.
The interior of the 1GK USA is a bit more mixed in terms of quality than the exterior is. However, the materials used are explicitly designed to increase the ball’s responsiveness-likely to make up for its uncommon rolling and flight patterns due to the butyl fins. Still, aside from being the only hand-sewn ball, this is also the only ball made with a latex bladder on our list. The potential downside is the cotton lining which will get heavy when wet-though it is much softer and provides better responsiveness than either polyester or nylon.

If you have a youth player for whom you are purchasing this soccer ball, then take note that the Size 3 ball in this series is closer to a Size 4 ball. The weight and feel is still accurate, so it is good for home practice and play. The sizing just might make it difficult to take this ball to practice for some players. It doesn’t come with a 32-panel design, but it does have the traditional hexagon panels over the entire cover of the ball. This allows players to work on some ball movement skills, as well as placement drills, with relative ease at home.
However, this has not stopped players from preferring butyl as their bladder material of choice. In fact, this preference is so well cemented by players of all skill sets, that manufacturers professional game balls are just as likely to use butyl bladders as they are latex often times even more likely. It is interesting to note that butyl is more durable than latex but less durable than rubber-despite providing had better air retention.

I’m playing soccer since I was 10, since 2005. I have also played it before, but I was not so serious as after. At the age of 10, I started to practice it seriously. Now I’m still playing it. During my career, I have tried, changed and played with many different soccer balls. Because I have tested so many of them, I have also created my top best soccer balls which you can see below.
This is a great ball with a fantastic design. The black is more gray than black, but the combination with yellow is a great contrast that gives you a distinctive ball on the field. Besides looks, equally important is performance, and this Franklin Sports Blackhawk Soccer Ball, Black, Size 5 rises to the challenge. It handles well, and its durable construction holds up to regular use. The air bladder keeps the ball at peak inflation, and minimizes the frequency of additional inflation.
This time there is no stitching to attach the panels, but they are thermally bonded. This is the interesting part. First, we wanted to see how it performs in the air for a free kick. You will find a decent, predictable trajectory. Although when you are knuckling, the result mainly depends on your skill and the air direction, a ball plays a vital role as well to help your process of a successful knuckle shot.
Soccer balls come in different variants and choosing one that is right will depend on how you prefer your ball and how you would like to use it. Soccer balls are built of different materials mostly made out of common rubber, polyurethane, nylon or polyvinyl chloride. While polyvinyl chloride balls can get really durable, they may not be as soft and touch responsive as polyurethane blend balls.
Crafted by Adidas, the Telstar 18 is the official ball of the FIFA World Cup. Drawing inspiration from the company's first World Cup match ball, which debuted at the 1970 tournament in Mexico, the new ball reimagines the 12 black panels on an otherwise white design. Fun fact: the iconic original black and white ball was made that way to be more visible for black-and-white TV viewers, and it was dubbed the "star of television."
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