This is a size 5 ball that can withstand an intense practice sessions and heated soccer matches. It has the highest FIFA rating which assures its users of its quality. To further ascertain its quality, this match ball has passed through a series of tests. These check to see whether its weight, shape, water uptake, and size retention are up to par. The casing uses PU and panels are hand stitched which sees to it that the ball holds together match after match. The latex bladder facilitates its high rebound characteristics.

Like many soccer balls that we reviewed, whenever a manufacturer makes it a point to offer an incredibly durable soccer ball, they ultimately make a soccer ball that is not very responsive. This is the case with the Wilson as well and is primarily a result of the materials chose. The PVC casing and nylon lining might be incredibly durable, but they do not offer much give. Aside from reducing the ball’s responsiveness, this also makes the Wilson a bit more painful to kick for long periods.
This ball uses installed sensors in it. These sensors collects data and shares it to your iOs and Android app via Bluetooth. Additionally, it gives you tips on how to improve your performance and compares kicks to keep track of your progress. Minimal maintenance is required as a single charge of this smart ball takes an hour and will facilitate about 2000 kicks each week. Its casing uses PU and the bladder – butyl. This ball has 32 thermal bonded panels hence increased control.
The inner lining and the bladder are some of the key components of a soccer ball’s construction. These components are the factors that give control to the shape and the feel of a soccer ball. The usual match soccer ball has four layers of a blended polyester and cotton material in its lining, while mid-range ones have two cotton and polyester layers.

During the 1900s, footballs were made out of rubber and leather which was perfect for bouncing and kicking the ball; however, when heading the football (hitting it with the player's head) it was usually painful. This problem was most probably due to water absorption of the leather from rain, which caused a considerable increase in weight, causing head or neck injury. By around 2017, this had also been associated with dementia in former players.[8][9] Another problem of early footballs was that they deteriorated quickly, as the leather used in manufacturing the footballs varied in thickness and in quality.[6]


This is a decision being made by a league operator or manager of some sort, this section is important for you.  For the individual, there isn’t much of a determination here.  If you want something really nice like the pros, go premium.  But if not, then you probably will just want to go with a training ball.  But for people equipping their teams with materials, this is a decision that needs to be taken seriously.  I would suggest that recreational leagues stick with training match balls, even for matches.  The number of kicks that the ball will get and the improper technique will cause headaches for you if you decide to buy premium balls.  For high schools, I suggest just regular match balls as many are still learning the basics of the game and many teams simply play “kickball” at that age.  For college teams, semi-pros, serious travel clubs, and of course, professional teams, I suggest premium match balls for play!
In 1937, the regulation soccer ball put on a little weight, increasing from 13-15 ounces to 14-16 ounces. Soccer balls used to be made exclusively of leather. Not so these days! Current technologies have come up with leather-like synthetic materials that are softer, more lightweight, water-proof, and perform as well if not better than leather soccer balls. As for the look, early soccer balls were tan but difficult to see from the stands; although white leather-washed soccer balls are known to have been used. White soccer balls replaced their tan predecessors in the 1950s, and were composed of 18 panels. Black spots were added to allow soccer players to track the ball's swerve. Today's soccer balls come in an array of colorful designs and styles to suit every player.
7. When you are buying online this is easier, because you have ratings and comments on many stores out there. It is good to look at top rated soccer balls or best selling soccer balls. Another good source to do is by visiting soccer forums where people talk about different things and there can be also a board/post about soccer balls, what they think, their experience etc.
A football, soccer ball, or association football ball is the ball used in the sport of association football. The name of the ball varies according to whether the sport is called "football", "soccer", or "association football". The ball's spherical shape, as well as its size, weight, and material composition, are specified by Law 2 of the Laws of the Game maintained by the International Football Association Board. Additional, more stringent, standards are specified by FIFA and subordinate governing bodies for the balls used in the competitions they sanction.
Early footballs began as animal bladders or stomachs that would easily fall apart if kicked too much. Improvements became possible in the 19th century with the introduction of rubber and discoveries of vulcanization by Charles Goodyear. The modern 32-panel ball design was developed in 1962 by Eigil Nielsen, and technological research continues today to develop footballs with improved performance. The 32-panel ball design was soon overcome by 24-panel balls as well as 42-panel balls, both of which improved performance compared to before, in 2007.[citation needed]
Ok i have read some of the negative reviews and i am sure there is the occasional faulty ball or the person who thinks they are buying a "regular match soccer ball"... that is not what this ball is designed for. It is an "ultra-durable" and nearly indestructible soccer ball. I have been buying these for 4 years and i give them away especially in Nicaragua. I would venture to say these balls are not designed for normal use in the USA on a manicured field... the flight, the touch is a little different... but if you play on hard surfaces, rocky roads, near barbed wire fences, in environments such as Nicaragua and other countries this is the best ball you can buy. I took my first ones to Nicaragua and left them and one was played with nearly every day for three years by some kids in a local
Soccer balls have several panels that influence their flight characteristics and the amount of control a player can have while playing. International soccer competitions use a 32-panel ball. Major leagues use an 18-panel ball and indoor leagues use a 6-panel ball. High-end soccer balls have hand-stitched panels with a synthetic thread. A low-cost one for practice and training will usually have its panels glued together.
As I mentioned above there are thousands of ball that you can choose from, but they are not all good and also we are here focused on best soccer balls under $100. If I would like to make a full review, I would have to buy a lot of balls and test all of them, but this unfortunately is not possible, because I don’t have so much money. Here comes out my experience during my career and other recommendations.
Voit goes a way back since its foundation in 1922 in providing the best soccer balls to all soccer fans and professional players. By the end of the 1920, the company introduced the first fully molded rubber soccer ball. They also came with the needle like air retention valves. They later invented a technology that allowed the balls to be machine wound with sturdy nylon threads over the rubber bladder. This ensured that the soccer balls would be stronger and more consistent. It also made balls cheaper and more available since they can be produced in mass production.
However, by selling out so hard in terms of responsiveness, the Mikasa has painted itself into a bit of a corner. Specifically, the synthetic leather casing makes this ball unsuitable for use on any surface outside of natural grass.In fact, even artificial grass will begin to wear down this ball once the glossy finish has been worn away. When you factor in the machine stitching, you end up with one of the least durable soccer balls on our list.

 I’ll be honest right out of the gate in saying that I don’t have any experience with Senda.  But after looking at this ball, I will have to try one out soon!  Senda brings a very classic look to its ball, giving you a throwback to days gone by.  It has 32 panels and claims that it can be used outdoors, indoors, and on turf.  It is hand stitched with premium leather and has four layers of hybrid polyester and cotton linings between the cover and the bladder to help it last longer.  It is NHFS approved with its latex bladder, so it would be great for use in high school matches.  And especially considering it’s low cost.
A quick inspection of the construction of the ball might help you make a quick decision. The first thing that you should look at is the panel of the ball. A soccer ball that has panels sewn together is a better choice than the ones that are glued together. The panels of a premium ball are stitched by hand while those of a lower quality are machine stitched.
What size soccer ball should I buy? The first step in purchasing soccer balls is determining the proper size(s) to buy. Many soccer leagues have different size requirements, so be sure to check with your coach or organization to find out which size ball to buy. Soccer balls for match use come in three different sizes which range from size 3 to size 5. For more information on soccer ball sizes, click here.

As I mentioned above there are thousands of ball that you can choose from, but they are not all good and also we are here focused on best soccer balls under $100. If I would like to make a full review, I would have to buy a lot of balls and test all of them, but this unfortunately is not possible, because I don’t have so much money. Here comes out my experience during my career and other recommendations.
For the most part, soccer balls are pretty affordable. Training soccer balls for kids start at under $10, and for around $60 or less, you can get a good, league-approved tournament soccer ball. Of course there are more expensive ones, depending on what you're looking for. Cost depends on the type of ball, materials, quality, and also the outlet you buy from. Our soccer balls can be bought economically in sets of six or more, or singly. Shopping online at Epic Sports can save you up to 60 percent if not more off retail prices on your favorite brands.
Soccer — or football as it's known around the world — is arguably the most loved sport on Earth. Although Americans still aren't as enamored of the sport as the rest of the world is, teams around the country are stealing hearts and minds, and Americans are getting into the game. For years, soccer has been a sport played by kids, college students, and ex-pats, but it's now being cheered in stadiums and watched on national TV.
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