Huge fan of Bend-It, I would not consider buying any other brand of ball. I have 4 or 5 different styles that have been used and abused during club training and off-season indoor games. It's fun watching another coach pick it out of a crowd of balls to check the brand. I've even had a pro player pick this ball out of a crowd to use in group training sessions (Go STL FC!!)
The interior of the 1GK USA is a bit more mixed in terms of quality than the exterior is. However, the materials used are explicitly designed to increase the ball’s responsiveness-likely to make up for its uncommon rolling and flight patterns due to the butyl fins. Still, aside from being the only hand-sewn ball, this is also the only ball made with a latex bladder on our list. The potential downside is the cotton lining which will get heavy when wet-though it is much softer and provides better responsiveness than either polyester or nylon.
Another type of soccer ball that some players may find to be useful is the indoor soccer ball. Indoor balls are designed to have less bounce and rebound to them, making it possible to control the ball on a tighter court or field. The cover of an indoor ball is also the strongest of any category, so it can withstand play on turn, hard court surfaces, and impacts with walls.

The downside? They’re expensive. Like, really expensive, depending on which one you get. Whether you really need one depends on your budget and how you’re going to be using your ball. For example, I use official match balls for practising freekicks because they fly through the air really nicely. However, I don’t use them for training because if I lose my ball I’ll be set back $100-$300.
With 3 sizes available, there is an appropriate ball for every age group, including number 5, which has the official dimensions. Because there are numerous sizes to choose from, the Glider II is a recommended choice for practicing drills for beginners new to the game and perhaps needing to start with a smaller ball. With its long-lasting material, performance is guaranteed with a ball built for
Much like the Adidas ball we saw earlier, this offering from Adidas is top-of-the-line.  This a premium match ball that also has received the highest rating from FIFA.  To get that rating, it passed tests on its weight, how it retains air, the shape, and how well it keeps water out.  It also has seamless panels like the Hi-Vis Champions League ball.  Although not a cheap ball, this is worth a look if you are interested I premium match balls.
MacGregor’s football ball has an official size of 4. It is the best rubber soccer ball to buy for a low price. It is a great starter ball for your little one and comes from high-quality materials that make it durable. Its Extended-life molded construction makes it the best playground soccer ball for kids. Besides, many customers recommend the MacGregor Rubber Soccer Ball because aside from being quite durable, it is pretty economical and worth the money you put on it.
Due to it being significantly softer than the other types of rubbers used for soccer ball bladders, latex is generally seen as the premier material. Though, this same perception may not hold as true for practice balls or even game balls at lower levels of competition. This is because latex bladders retain air worse than all of the other soccer ball bladder materials and will need to be re-inflated more often.
Premium Match Balls. These are the most expensive soccer balls that you’ll find on the market today. They are FIFA-approved balls, so they meet all of the standards necessary for international play. Air retention, water-resistance, and performance are far superior when compared to a training ball. Virtually every professional league uses a ball of this quality for game play.
My favorite best soccer ball under 100$ from the list above Italy evoPOWER 1 Statement Match ball. I like its design and I’m almost sure it has great quality and can give you best experience. I’m also a fan of Serie A league, so this is an extra plus at my decision. Above that it has some great recommendations, so this is my best soccer ball under $100.

Our main intention of discussing the different types of balls is to educate you so that you can buy the right product. For example using practice balls on the street will bring you no good but some awful experiences as the ball will not last long. Similarly, an indoor soccer ball is not good to play on a beach. Keep this in mind when buying, and using a ball.

7. When you are buying online this is easier, because you have ratings and comments on many stores out there. It is good to look at top rated soccer balls or best selling soccer balls. Another good source to do is by visiting soccer forums where people talk about different things and there can be also a board/post about soccer balls, what they think, their experience etc.
If you have a youth player for whom you are purchasing this soccer ball, then take note that the Size 3 ball in this series is closer to a Size 4 ball. The weight and feel is still accurate, so it is good for home practice and play. The sizing just might make it difficult to take this ball to practice for some players. It doesn’t come with a 32-panel design, but it does have the traditional hexagon panels over the entire cover of the ball. This allows players to work on some ball movement skills, as well as placement drills, with relative ease at home.
The ball has good texture. It seems to hold air pretty well. The design is cool and is definitely one that is not seen on the pitch or practice field normally. I only have concern that a few of the patches on the ball are not flush with the others. 2 of the small panels are a little raised than the others where the seems meet. When my son and I pass the ball on a perfect synthetic field, it seems to jump just slightly, but it could be in my head since I have seen the seems not level to each other in a few spots on the ball. Mine may be abnormal. Other than that, the ball seems very well made. It even makes the right noises when kicked hard. Overall pretty satisfied.
Adidas says its design was motivated by Russia's urban landscapes. It uses textured graphics and a metallic sheen to bring a modern look to the classic design. The ball is made of six panels of thermally bonded TPU and about 15% silicone. The materials allow for better trajectory, accuracy, responsiveness, and low water absorption. It also feels well-padded and slightly lighter than previous match balls.
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