What are the different types of soccer balls? Should I buy an expensive one, a middle priced one or a cheap one? What kind of balls are adequate for my needs?  Most soccer balls can be divided into three different categories, professional match balls, match balls, and practice balls.  The type you need of course depends on how and where you want to use the soccer ball. For more information on types of soccer balls, click here. 
Early footballs began as animal bladders or stomachs that would easily fall apart if kicked too much. Improvements became possible in the 19th century with the introduction of rubber and discoveries of vulcanization by Charles Goodyear. The modern 32-panel ball design was developed in 1962 by Eigil Nielsen, and technological research continues today to develop footballs with improved performance. The 32-panel ball design was soon overcome by 24-panel balls as well as 42-panel balls, both of which improved performance compared to before, in 2007.[citation needed]
Size 5 is the official size for professional matches. Therefore, this ball is only available in this size. Do not use this soccer ball on concreted areas. Its unique rubber uses Puma Airlock Valve Technology (PAL) in order to facilitate proper airlock technology. This ball features Perimeter Balance Technology (PBT) which enables it to maintain impressive flight characteristics.
Regardless of how popular the soccer ball is, this is also one of the most durable soccer balls that we reviewed. This starts with the casing, which is made out of PVC. While this is not the best material for touch, PVC is one of the most durable materials used for soccer ball casings. On top of the casing, the lining of the Wilson soccer ball is made of nylon that is stronger than the commonly used polyester alternative. Combined, the nylon and PVC also make this the most water-resistant soccer ball on our list.

With all of those accolades, you might be a bit surprised that this is only rated as the best training soccer ball we reviewed rather than the best performing. For the most part, those questions are warranted as the first two layers of this soccer ball are made out of great materials. The casing is made of TPU, which provides a solid amount of durability, but it is the lining that stands out. With both polyester and EVA, this ball is easier to kick for longer periods without suffering from fatigue.


It came in a large box to accommodate the ball packaging. It comes semi deflated, so it needed some pumping before throwing it out to the kids to test out for the day. They loved the feel and control. Now, I think some was in their heads from knowing it was an actual ball the tis used for the pros, the text of the outside and the material did seem to give them better control over a $30 ball
Size 5 is the official size for professional matches. Therefore, this ball is only available in this size. Do not use this soccer ball on concreted areas. Its unique rubber uses Puma Airlock Valve Technology (PAL) in order to facilitate proper airlock technology. This ball features Perimeter Balance Technology (PBT) which enables it to maintain impressive flight characteristics.
Whereas plenty of manufacturers that we reviewed opted to go with a soccer ball that was more durable than responsive, Mikasa takes the opposite approach and focuses primarily on the touch that their ball can provide. This is most apparent in the soccer ball’s choice of casing material. The synthetic leather casing of the Mikasa is by far the softest and naturally responsive-without the inclusion of texture-out of any other soccer ball we reviewed. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3OKagE2ZIRA
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