Though, a ball designed to be played virtually anywhere will have to sacrifice something to achieve that versatility. For the Brasilia, that sacrifice comes in the form of responsiveness. While the glossy finish may offer some protection, it also reduces your touch with the ball. A bladder made out of synthetic rubber-not to mention that TPU is only okay when it comes to touch in the first place, further compounds this effect.


Inflate soccer balls to the pressure of 6-8 PPI (pounds per square inch). A pressure gauge will tell you when the air is enough. Under or over-inflating a soccer ball will shorten its life in one way or another. When under-inflated, the ball will not be resistant to the impact of kicks. On the other hand, over inflation will stretch out the bladder and put pressure on the panel stitches.
If you have a youth player for whom you are purchasing this soccer ball, then take note that the Size 3 ball in this series is closer to a Size 4 ball. The weight and feel is still accurate, so it is good for home practice and play. The sizing just might make it difficult to take this ball to practice for some players. It doesn’t come with a 32-panel design, but it does have the traditional hexagon panels over the entire cover of the ball. This allows players to work on some ball movement skills, as well as placement drills, with relative ease at home.
The 1GK USA ball may seem to look a bit odd, but that is definitely by design. However, do not let its unusual appearance fool you: the 1GK USA is by far one of the most durable soccer balls that we reviewed. This begins with a solid TPU casing, but it is primarily due to the construction of the ball. Specifically, this is the only ball on our list that uses hand stitching. Granted, that is somewhat necessary to ensure that the butyl rubber fins stay attached.
The ball has good texture. It seems to hold air pretty well. The design is cool and is definitely one that is not seen on the pitch or practice field normally. I only have concern that a few of the patches on the ball are not flush with the others. 2 of the small panels are a little raised than the others where the seems meet. When my son and I pass the ball on a perfect synthetic field, it seems to jump just slightly, but it could be in my head since I have seen the seems not level to each other in a few spots on the ball. Mine may be abnormal. Other than that, the ball seems very well made. It even makes the right noises when kicked hard. Overall pretty satisfied.
Outfitting a team? 1soccerstore.com also offers a variety of soccer balls for teams in multiple quantities so your team can train like the professionals and be ready to hit the pitch on game day. We offer a variety of packages for teams with quantity discount pricing and various soccer ball models to fit the budget and needs of your team. We offer the largest selection of soccer balls including adidas soccer balls and Nike soccer balls, as well as a variety of Sala balls for soccer training.
It depends on its intended use. Soccer ball casings are made from three kinds of synthetic materials. Polyvinyl carbonate (PVC) which is what most less expensive training balls are made from, Polyurethane (PU) which is the preferred ball for soccer tournaments, and a combination of the two. There are also foam and rubber training soccer balls for kids. Some kids' soccer balls are made of 100 percent thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU), which is a kind of foamy casing material so the ball is very soft. There are greater and lesser grades of each kind of material. PU-covered balls are generally softer, livelier, and have a better feel to them, and are what most people seek when looking for a optimal performing soccer ball.

How Do I inflate my soccer balls? Soccer balls lose air pressure over time. Sometimes over a few days (soccer balls that use butyl bladders keep air pressure longer than balls that use latex bladders). Be sure to check the pressure frequently to make sure the ball is properly inflated.  Therefore, invest in a good ball pump, have a supply of inflation needles and use a low pressure gauge to measure for proper inflation. 
If you've ever noticed, a traditional soccer ball resembles a geodesic dome building. Such as the one designed by architect, Richard Buckminster Fuller. Thus the ball became called the Buckminster Ball. Or more simply, the "Buckeyball". The design is characterized by a pattern of twenty hexagon pieces, and twelve pentagon pieces, fitted together to create a perfect sphere. The soccer ball has undergone many design changes of various-shaped panels stitched together. But until the geodesic dome-like ball, it was never quite round enough to perform right. Manufacturers settled upon the modern thirty-two panel design, which enables the ball to roll and spin more evenly and smoothly. Which is probably why it's the most popular competition soccer ball on the market today. The Buckminister-style soccer ball was first sold in the 1950s, and debuted in the 1970 World Cup tournament.
This ball is a premium match ball from Adidas, whom I consider to be the best of the best at making soccer balls.  This is a high-visibility ball, coming in a bright orange, to help teams just in case of inclement conditions such as rain or possibly snow. This ball has the highest possible rating from FIFA because of its seamless makeup and its latex bladder which allow for excellent rebound in your shot.  The seamless panels also allow it to take in very little water, making this an excellent buy if you are looking for a premium match ball.
For the most part, soccer balls are pretty affordable. Training soccer balls for kids start at under $10, and for around $60 or less, you can get a good, league-approved tournament soccer ball. Of course there are more expensive ones, depending on what you're looking for. Cost depends on the type of ball, materials, quality, and also the outlet you buy from. Our soccer balls can be bought economically in sets of six or more, or singly. Shopping online at Epic Sports can save you up to 60 percent if not more off retail prices on your favorite brands.
Soccer balls have several panels that influence their flight characteristics and the amount of control a player can have while playing. International soccer competitions use a 32-panel ball. Major leagues use an 18-panel ball and indoor leagues use a 6-panel ball. High-end soccer balls have hand-stitched panels with a synthetic thread. A low-cost one for practice and training will usually have its panels glued together.
The amount that you are willing to pay for the soccer ball might influence your search. These range in price depending on its type, make, quality and other features. If you are looking for a ball to kick around for fun or for a child as a toy, it is best that you opt for an inexpensive ball as they are likely to ruin the ball or easily get bored with it shortly after. This also applies to children who are in a league as they will soon outgrow the ball hence the need for a bigger and more expensive soccer ball.

Footballs have gone through a dramatic change over time. During medieval times balls were normally made from an outer shell of leather filled with cork shavings.[4] Another method of creating a ball was using animal bladders for the inside of the ball making it inflatable. However, these two styles of creating footballs made it easy for the ball to puncture and were inadequate for kicking. It was not until the 19th century that footballs developed into what a football looks like today.
Elements of the football that today are tested are the deformation of the football when it is kicked or when the ball hits a surface. Two styles of footballs have been tested by the Sports Technology Research Group of Wolfson School of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering in Loughborough University; these two models are called the Basic FE model and the Developed FE model of the football. The basic model considered the ball as being a spherical shell with isotropic material properties. The developed model also utilised isotropic material properties but included an additional stiffer stitching seam region.
This size five blue soccer ball is an updated classic ball with a traditional 32-panel machine stitched design and a fun, colorful look. It is a great soccer ball for training and comes with a long-lasting air retention bladder that helps reduce deflation. The Pro Trainer new soccer ball has a durable cover with counter balanced graphics. Franklin Sports is a reputable company with years of experience making the best soccer equipment, and you’ll undoubtedly want to purchase one of their soccer balls if you want to train and play like a pro.
Official Nike Merlin Match Ball used within the ACC division of NCAA collegiate soccer. This is a used ball with some minor scuffs and sharpie on the ball. The ball holds air perfectly and has no defects during play. This ball does not come with the original packaging as they come in bulk. The ball is too scuffed to be played during official games, so there are surplus between these and practice balls. This ball will ship deflated to make shipping cheaper. Will ship fast. No returns.
Before reading this I thought a soccer ball was a soccer ball I had no idea there were so many different types for different things. I found this information very useful on where to start with buying a soccer ball for my 5 1/2 year old son who has just joined his first soccer team and is showing great interest in learning new tricks and skills. What would be your best recommendation for him? Thanks
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