This time there is no stitching to attach the panels, but they are thermally bonded. This is the interesting part. First, we wanted to see how it performs in the air for a free kick. You will find a decent, predictable trajectory. Although when you are knuckling, the result mainly depends on your skill and the air direction, a ball plays a vital role as well to help your process of a successful knuckle shot.
That Mikasa ranks #2 on the list comes as no surprise to me as I have had great experiences with Mikasa.  This is a great mid-range soccer ball that falls into the match ball category.  Many users have claimed that they have been able to play with these balls for a couple of seasons!  That’s unheard of for most soccer balls because the stitching begins to come off.  This is a FIFA Approved Professional ball, meaning that it is up to the standards of professional players.  This is rare to see an approved ball for this price.  This is a great mid-range ball to have.

Only size 5, and size 4 are available for this. Although this should not be a major problem as this is for recreational play and practicing purpose, so kids are ok to play with this as well. In fact, the ball that will be given away to the developing countries will be used by the kids mostly. If you are buying this for an adult go for size 5, and if you are buying for kids or youth players then better go for size 4.
This ball is a premium match ball from Adidas, whom I consider to be the best of the best at making soccer balls.  This is a high-visibility ball, coming in a bright orange, to help teams just in case of inclement conditions such as rain or possibly snow. This ball has the highest possible rating from FIFA because of its seamless makeup and its latex bladder which allow for excellent rebound in your shot.  The seamless panels also allow it to take in very little water, making this an excellent buy if you are looking for a premium match ball.
The downside? They’re expensive. Like, really expensive, depending on which one you get. Whether you really need one depends on your budget and how you’re going to be using your ball. For example, I use official match balls for practising freekicks because they fly through the air really nicely. However, I don’t use them for training because if I lose my ball I’ll be set back $100-$300.
Latex bladders are one of the best materials when it comes to ball construction. However, with latex bladders, air won’t last as long as butyl bladders and will need more attention for proper inflation. Butyl-blend bladders hold in the air much better, but they are harder and less receptive in play. Mid-priced balls will usually have a mix of butyl and rubber. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c1SVcjYY6TE
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