This ball has a TPU cover that we wouldn’t describe as “highly durable” for rough play. Although it handles indoor turf, it won’t handle concrete, gravel, or court-based play like you have with futsal. This ball prefers to have a natural or artificial grass surface and that is about it. If you happen to impact a tree, run the ball on concrete, or have it bounce on a gravel driveway, the outer cover does tend to get scratched up pretty rapidly. The butyl bladder is of a higher quality than other balls at this price point, allowing the ball to hold its inflation pressure with an impressive amount of consistency.

This is the best ball ever made for dogs, especially large dogs who can usually rip a ball apart in a matter of minutes, like mine. This is our second one, the first one we had for over 2 years and my pit bull put so many teeth marks in this ball and it never went flat. The pump end eventually fell out and it still stayed round and would bounce. We only had to buy another one because my crazy dog liked to throw it up in the air and it went over the back fence and another dog (or kid) decided to take it home. I also like that I buy one for my dog, and a kid somewhere gets one too. I will never own another brand of ball for my dogs.
When it comes to soccer ball bladders, you will generally opt for the material that provides the most responsive touch for the highest levels of play. This is because it is a simple matter to re-inflate a soccer ball not to mention the fact that most competitive leagues will have numerous balls on hand. If touch and responsiveness are your key bladder attribute, there is no other material better than latex.

When a tournament is held (like the FIFA World Cup), the sponsor of the event will design a brand new ball. These are official match balls – they’re used by professionals during real matches. They are designed to the highest possible build quality, have textured surfaces to improve stability in flight, and feature thermally-bonded panels for durability.
A tribute to one of the richest teams in the world, Paris St. Germain, this ball is dressed in their colors.  This is a ball meant for everyday use, so you can get out there and show off your favorite club to everyone.  It is made from polyurethane and has some polyester inside of it, making it slightly different than the Messi ball.  The polyester buttresses the butyl bladder, causing it to retain air and shape.  It is machine stitched and has 26 panels, so it may take a little bit of getting used to the first time.  Like the Messi ball, it comes at a pretty steep price, so it may be a little pricey if you aren’t a PSG fan!
This is a decision being made by a league operator or manager of some sort, this section is important for you.  For the individual, there isn’t much of a determination here.  If you want something really nice like the pros, go premium.  But if not, then you probably will just want to go with a training ball.  But for people equipping their teams with materials, this is a decision that needs to be taken seriously.  I would suggest that recreational leagues stick with training match balls, even for matches.  The number of kicks that the ball will get and the improper technique will cause headaches for you if you decide to buy premium balls.  For high schools, I suggest just regular match balls as many are still learning the basics of the game and many teams simply play “kickball” at that age.  For college teams, semi-pros, serious travel clubs, and of course, professional teams, I suggest premium match balls for play!

Today's footballs are more complex than past footballs. Most modern footballs consist of twelve regular pentagonal and twenty regular hexagonal panels positioned in a truncated icosahedron spherical geometry.[4] Some premium-grade 32-panel balls use non-regular polygons to give a closer approximation to sphericality.[12] The inside of the football is made up of a latex bladder which enables the football to be pressurised. The ball's panel pairs are stitched along the edge; this procedure can either be performed manually or with a machine.[5] The size of a football is roughly 22 cm (8.65 inches) in diameter for a regulation size 5 ball. Rules state that a size 5 ball must be 68 to 70 cm in circumference. Averaging that to 69 cm and then dividing by π gives about 22 cm for a diameter.
Soccer — or football as it's known around the world — is arguably the most loved sport on Earth. Although Americans still aren't as enamored of the sport as the rest of the world is, teams around the country are stealing hearts and minds, and Americans are getting into the game. For years, soccer has been a sport played by kids, college students, and ex-pats, but it's now being cheered in stadiums and watched on national TV.
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