Thank you very much for your exceptionally informative guide. It provides excellent detail around the composition of soccer balls, different types of balls on the market, and what balls appear to be the best on the market in each category. A really useful website that I have bookmarked for consideration when I am next in the market for a new soccer ball (which will be soon as my old champions league ball from several years ago is getting a bit tatty!)
Enough learning on different aspects of soccer balls? Let’s have some fun then. We are going to give you our other specific reviews on different types of soccer balls so that you can choose the right option for you applying the knowledge you have just gathered. Obviously we suggest you to buy from the ones that we reviewed above. But you can consider the following ones as well.

I purchased the soccer ball for my son as a gift. It came deflated so we filled it with air before boxing it. Upon opening it, it was deflated. It only held air for a few hours. I contacted the company and they immediately shipped out a new one without hassle that is holding air just fine. (I was very pleased with how prompt and pleasant they were!) It lights up very bright when hit or bounced and turns off on its own after a little while of not being hit or bounced. My kids all love it and play with it nightly. It is not stitched as a real soccer ball is, but is more of a heat fused soft plastic. It holds up just fine though to my 13 year old soccer player's kicks. We are all enjoying playing with it and happy with our purchase.
This ball has seen a lot of use since Christmas, and while that's not a good indication of how long the batteries and lights will last, my kids have been having a blast with it at night. This ball isn't like a normal soccer ball, it's more of a smooth rubber, so it won't have the same feel as a normal ball. It feels heavier to me too, but I didn't confirm that on the scale. Once or twice the ball turned off in use, but came back on after a minute. I recommend this ball as an outdoor nighttime novelty ball, certainly not a competition ball. And the 5-star rating is directly from my 8-year-old son. His words, "I love it!"

Today's footballs are more complex than past footballs. Most modern footballs consist of twelve regular pentagonal and twenty regular hexagonal panels positioned in a truncated icosahedron spherical geometry.[4] Some premium-grade 32-panel balls use non-regular polygons to give a closer approximation to sphericality.[12] The inside of the football is made up of a latex bladder which enables the football to be pressurised. The ball's panel pairs are stitched along the edge; this procedure can either be performed manually or with a machine.[5] The size of a football is roughly 22 cm (8.65 inches) in diameter for a regulation size 5 ball. Rules state that a size 5 ball must be 68 to 70 cm in circumference. Averaging that to 69 cm and then dividing by π gives about 22 cm for a diameter.
Whether it was a size 3, 4, or 5, we found that the Adidas Starlancer performed as it should. This allows beginning players at any age to begin getting a feel for what it is like to have the ball at their feet. There are two color options that come with the Starlancer as well and each performs as it should. For normal passing, crossing, and shooting drills, we found this soccer ball to be true to form. The machine stitching is strong and offers a fairly long lasting performance.
Tachikara ball is sold deflated at a reasonable price that is friendly to your pocket. The orange and white size-three ball is made of leather and machine-stitched making it very durable. It is the ideal ball for PE classes, for warm-ups, camps, and recreational play. This new soccer ball with butyl bladder is a great all around youth football ball.

With 32 machine stitched panels, the American Challenge Brasilia comes together to create a soccer ball that has a beautiful, shiny outer casing. 4 color choices include Lemon, Lime, Orange, and Raspberry. The design on each ball is elegant without being distracting, and its surface is resistant to scrapes and scratches that ruin the aesthetic appeal.
Select was founded by a famous Danish goalkeeper back in 1947. Eigil Nielsin knew what it takes to make a good soccer ball so he put his experience into action by starting his business. He produced the first soccer balls that came without lacing. So start your soccer journey with this excellent brand. If you buy a select soccer ball, I think you will never go back to any other brand.
That Mikasa ranks #2 on the list comes as no surprise to me as I have had great experiences with Mikasa.  This is a great mid-range soccer ball that falls into the match ball category.  Many users have claimed that they have been able to play with these balls for a couple of seasons!  That’s unheard of for most soccer balls because the stitching begins to come off.  This is a FIFA Approved Professional ball, meaning that it is up to the standards of professional players.  This is rare to see an approved ball for this price.  This is a great mid-range ball to have.
The fact that this ball was not only tested but used in 2016 Euro qualification matches makes it a trusted choice. Its graphics are minimal with the majority of the surface being white in color. A hint of red and silver streaks breaks the monotony of the white yet maintains a simplistic appeal which appeals to the simplistic users. The graphic designs go against the panels which gives it a unique appeal. Its casing uses 100% PU leather and the panels are thermal-bonded which makes the surface smooth. Its bladder uses butyl material which improves air retention. The surface of the ball provides lower water absorption which contributes to its durability and gives it a better feel.
A tribute to one of the richest teams in the world, Paris St. Germain, this ball is dressed in their colors.  This is a ball meant for everyday use, so you can get out there and show off your favorite club to everyone.  It is made from polyurethane and has some polyester inside of it, making it slightly different than the Messi ball.  The polyester buttresses the butyl bladder, causing it to retain air and shape.  It is machine stitched and has 26 panels, so it may take a little bit of getting used to the first time.  Like the Messi ball, it comes at a pretty steep price, so it may be a little pricey if you aren’t a PSG fan!

Latex bladders are one of the best materials when it comes to ball construction. However, with latex bladders, air won’t last as long as butyl bladders and will need more attention for proper inflation. Butyl-blend bladders hold in the air much better, but they are harder and less receptive in play. Mid-priced balls will usually have a mix of butyl and rubber. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c1SVcjYY6TE
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