I decided to try to contact Kan Jam, since I was more interested in the possibility of an exchange than a return. In my experience, if a company will honor an exchange, some of the time, they won't require that you send the original product back. But I couldn't find any direct contact info for Kan Jam and decided to just open up a Return Request through Amazon. I did say in the comments that I would prefer an exchange over a return, but I
Huge fan of Bend-It, I would not consider buying any other brand of ball. I have 4 or 5 different styles that have been used and abused during club training and off-season indoor games. It's fun watching another coach pick it out of a crowd of balls to check the brand. I've even had a pro player pick this ball out of a crowd to use in group training sessions (Go STL FC!!)
What is the difference between a high quality soccer ball and a low quality soccer ball? When purchasing soccer balls, many people buy according to the price of the ball. If a ball is expensive, that meant that it is a high quality ball and if it was a low costing ball, the ball is a low quality. That is not always true. Many players, coaches, clubs and even professionals do not know what type of ball to buy for their particular needs.  Please go to the following Soccer Ball World page to start learning about the construction of the various types of soccer balls, click here.
Soccer balls come in different variants and choosing one that is right will depend on how you prefer your ball and how you would like to use it. Soccer balls are built of different materials mostly made out of common rubber, polyurethane, nylon or polyvinyl chloride. While polyvinyl chloride balls can get really durable, they may not be as soft and touch responsive as polyurethane blend balls.
I bought this ball for a non-traditional use: my miniature donkey LOVES to roll and toss balls, and slightly deflated soccer balls seem to be easiest for him to grab. We've had this one for several months now, and it has withstood his rough play extremely well. In fact, I'm back to buy another so we have a backup in case our first gets lost. I definitely recommend!
However, this has not stopped players from preferring butyl as their bladder material of choice. In fact, this preference is so well cemented by players of all skill sets, that manufacturers professional game balls are just as likely to use butyl bladders as they are latex often times even more likely. It is interesting to note that butyl is more durable than latex but less durable than rubber-despite providing had better air retention.
Today's footballs are more complex than past footballs. Most modern footballs consist of twelve regular pentagonal and twenty regular hexagonal panels positioned in a truncated icosahedron spherical geometry.[4] Some premium-grade 32-panel balls use non-regular polygons to give a closer approximation to sphericality.[12] The inside of the football is made up of a latex bladder which enables the football to be pressurised. The ball's panel pairs are stitched along the edge; this procedure can either be performed manually or with a machine.[5] The size of a football is roughly 22 cm (8.65 inches) in diameter for a regulation size 5 ball. Rules state that a size 5 ball must be 68 to 70 cm in circumference. Averaging that to 69 cm and then dividing by π gives about 22 cm for a diameter.
That Mikasa ranks #2 on the list comes as no surprise to me as I have had great experiences with Mikasa.  This is a great mid-range soccer ball that falls into the match ball category.  Many users have claimed that they have been able to play with these balls for a couple of seasons!  That’s unheard of for most soccer balls because the stitching begins to come off.  This is a FIFA Approved Professional ball, meaning that it is up to the standards of professional players.  This is rare to see an approved ball for this price.  This is a great mid-range ball to have.
Footballs have gone through a dramatic change over time. During medieval times balls were normally made from an outer shell of leather filled with cork shavings.[4] Another method of creating a ball was using animal bladders for the inside of the ball making it inflatable. However, these two styles of creating footballs made it easy for the ball to puncture and were inadequate for kicking. It was not until the 19th century that footballs developed into what a football looks like today.
Soccer — or football as it's known around the world — is arguably the most loved sport on Earth. Although Americans still aren't as enamored of the sport as the rest of the world is, teams around the country are stealing hearts and minds, and Americans are getting into the game. For years, soccer has been a sport played by kids, college students, and ex-pats, but it's now being cheered in stadiums and watched on national TV.
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