Soccer balls come in different variants and choosing one that is right will depend on how you prefer your ball and how you would like to use it. Soccer balls are built of different materials mostly made out of common rubber, polyurethane, nylon or polyvinyl chloride. While polyvinyl chloride balls can get really durable, they may not be as soft and touch responsive as polyurethane blend balls.
I’m playing soccer since I was 10, since 2005. I have also played it before, but I was not so serious as after. At the age of 10, I started to practice it seriously. Now I’m still playing it. During my career, I have tried, changed and played with many different soccer balls. Because I have tested so many of them, I have also created my top best soccer balls which you can see below.
The outside of the soccer ball is typically made from one of two materials: PVC or Polyurethane.  PVC is much more affordable and durable, and these are typically seen in training soccer balls because training balls go through much more of a continuous beating.  Polyurethane balls are usually even softer than PVC balls and its ability to go where you want it to go is much better than the PVC balls.  As a result, these are typically higher-end balls.  However, there are still various ways to construct them, and not all PVC or polyurethane balls are created the same.  Glossy coatings, which are very popular in the public fields with the kids and adults alike, are also very useful because they help reduce scuffing and the intake of water.
This is a great ball with a fantastic design. The black is more gray than black, but the combination with yellow is a great contrast that gives you a distinctive ball on the field. Besides looks, equally important is performance, and this Franklin Sports Blackhawk Soccer Ball, Black, Size 5 rises to the challenge. It handles well, and its durable construction holds up to regular use. The air bladder keeps the ball at peak inflation, and minimizes the frequency of additional inflation.
Customers really enjoyed the speed of this ball on the ground, although this exterior TPU was a little slick when making contact for a kick. Users really enjoyed the low price of this soccer ball replica vs. the exact ball that the pros use in European match play. You just need to make sure that you have your own ball bump because the ball does not come inflated.
Today's footballs are more complex than past footballs. Most modern footballs consist of twelve regular pentagonal and twenty regular hexagonal panels positioned in a truncated icosahedron spherical geometry.[4] Some premium-grade 32-panel balls use non-regular polygons to give a closer approximation to sphericality.[12] The inside of the football is made up of a latex bladder which enables the football to be pressurised. The ball's panel pairs are stitched along the edge; this procedure can either be performed manually or with a machine.[5] The size of a football is roughly 22 cm (8.65 inches) in diameter for a regulation size 5 ball. Rules state that a size 5 ball must be 68 to 70 cm in circumference. Averaging that to 69 cm and then dividing by π gives about 22 cm for a diameter.
Thank you very much for your exceptionally informative guide. It provides excellent detail around the composition of soccer balls, different types of balls on the market, and what balls appear to be the best on the market in each category. A really useful website that I have bookmarked for consideration when I am next in the market for a new soccer ball (which will be soon as my old champions league ball from several years ago is getting a bit tatty!)
If you love Nike products, then you need to buy this soccer ball that sells at a low price but still has excellent features for outstanding performance. It features a 32-panel design that makes it quite durable and a machine-stitched TPU casing that allows consistent play. The high-contrast graphics ensures easy visual tracking while the reinforced butyl bladder maximizes speed and enhances air retention.
We covered the quality in small detail above, but we’ll look into a little further here.  The quality of the ball you pick is very important.  If you want exactly what the pros play with, then you will have to pay a little more as a result of picking the premium choice. Those balls fly better and more true than their counterparts, but they are not meant to be practiced with on a regular basis.  Premium balls tend to have a softer impact on both your cleats and ankle guards to allow for more ball control and handling.  After the “premium” match ball category is the “match ball” category.  These aren’t nearly as expensive as the premiums are, but are still very good in match situations.  These aren’t meant for practice, but they typically can hold up for extended periods of time, possibly a season or two.  The third type is “training balls.”  These balls are meant for training and practice, and they can be used continuously without doing damage to it.  I have some great training balls that have lasted upwards of six years!  The quality of training balls has gone up drastically over the years that I have been playing.  When I was younger, some of them were so hard that you’d feel like your foot was broken after kicking them.  Nowadays, they literally feel like a premium ball with their softness and their flight.  So, almost any ball is great nowadays from the right supplier!
This ball truly lives up to its name as a “glider,” having a stable flight path when shot and a nice feel when passed. The surface is relatively grippy, which is great for goalkeepers looking to practice their catches. Because the ball isn’t as slippery as some other replicas, you can shoot it with a bit more swerve, and dribbling and skill moves are a bit easier.
 I’ll be honest right out of the gate in saying that I don’t have any experience with Senda.  But after looking at this ball, I will have to try one out soon!  Senda brings a very classic look to its ball, giving you a throwback to days gone by.  It has 32 panels and claims that it can be used outdoors, indoors, and on turf.  It is hand stitched with premium leather and has four layers of hybrid polyester and cotton linings between the cover and the bladder to help it last longer.  It is NHFS approved with its latex bladder, so it would be great for use in high school matches.  And especially considering it’s low cost.
To be honest, this ball’s a bit like a classic car, in that it’s awesome – when it works. The Jabulani is prone to valve issues, although they can be fixed. If you need something durable, we wouldn’t recommend this ball. However, if you’re looking to add an awesome ball to your collection – and you’ve got the cash – consider grabbing a Jabulani before they go extinct.
Enough learning on different aspects of soccer balls? Let’s have some fun then. We are going to give you our other specific reviews on different types of soccer balls so that you can choose the right option for you applying the knowledge you have just gathered. Obviously we suggest you to buy from the ones that we reviewed above. But you can consider the following ones as well.
Well, panels are not any different component. Panels are the segments or octagon quilt that are seen outside the balls. Of course, nowadays you will find some other shapes besides octagon. FIFA official balls usually contain 32 panels. But nowadays you will also find 26, 18, 14, 8 or even 6 panels with different shapes and designs from those of conventional balls.
The most modern feature is an embedded NFC chip, which is found on the top of the ball. If you download a free app on iOS or Android, you can personally interact with the ball's exclusive content and location-specific challenges. You'll also be able to participate and enter competitions and World Cup-related challenges. Of course, you can record and upload your experiences for social media posterity.
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