In the year 1863, the first specifications for footballs were laid down by the Football Association. Previous to this, footballs were made out of inflated leather, with later leather coverings to help footballs maintain their shapes.[3] In 1872 the specifications were revised, and these rules have been left essentially unchanged as defined by the International Football Association Board. Differences in footballs created since this rule came into effect have been to do with the material used in their creation.
Whether it was a size 3, 4, or 5, we found that the Adidas Starlancer performed as it should. This allows beginning players at any age to begin getting a feel for what it is like to have the ball at their feet. There are two color options that come with the Starlancer as well and each performs as it should. For normal passing, crossing, and shooting drills, we found this soccer ball to be true to form. The machine stitching is strong and offers a fairly long lasting performance.
I bought three and used them for juggling, shooting practice and kicking against a wall. I juggled 90,000 times in 3 months, and shot many times on goal and kicked against walls. These are very durable. I look for durability in practice balls and these are superb. I wonder if Wilson has the newer cover pattern with the same internal structure in any model of ball. It would be wise to do that for the sake of staying current. I love the feel when kicking. Variable amounts of air can be used based on personal preference while practicing. A little less air allows a more forgiving bounce while juggling.
Crafted by Adidas, the Telstar 18 is the official ball of the FIFA World Cup. Drawing inspiration from the company's first World Cup match ball, which debuted at the 1970 tournament in Mexico, the new ball reimagines the 12 black panels on an otherwise white design. Fun fact: the iconic original black and white ball was made that way to be more visible for black-and-white TV viewers, and it was dubbed the "star of television."
This is a size 5 ball that can withstand an intense practice sessions and heated soccer matches. It has the highest FIFA rating which assures its users of its quality. To further ascertain its quality, this match ball has passed through a series of tests. These check to see whether its weight, shape, water uptake, and size retention are up to par. The casing uses PU and panels are hand stitched which sees to it that the ball holds together match after match. The latex bladder facilitates its high rebound characteristics.
If you have a youth player for whom you are purchasing this soccer ball, then take note that the Size 3 ball in this series is closer to a Size 4 ball. The weight and feel is still accurate, so it is good for home practice and play. The sizing just might make it difficult to take this ball to practice for some players. It doesn’t come with a 32-panel design, but it does have the traditional hexagon panels over the entire cover of the ball. This allows players to work on some ball movement skills, as well as placement drills, with relative ease at home.

Tachikara ball is sold deflated at a reasonable price that is friendly to your pocket. The orange and white size-three ball is made of leather and machine-stitched making it very durable. It is the ideal ball for PE classes, for warm-ups, camps, and recreational play. This new soccer ball with butyl bladder is a great all around youth football ball.
This soccer ball is virtually indestructible. The manufacturers have designed it to withstand any challenge yet still keep afloat. It can be run over by a truck yet it will still maintain its balance. Set it ablaze and it will still hold its ground. Instead of air, this ball uses a unique foam known as ethylene-vinyl acetate foam. With this, the ball will never need a pump and will never go flat even when punctured. This special foam reinflates the ball when the need arises. This is a durable ball and you can use it on all types of playgrounds: concrete, grass, sand or any other surface.
The interior of the 1GK USA is a bit more mixed in terms of quality than the exterior is. However, the materials used are explicitly designed to increase the ball’s responsiveness-likely to make up for its uncommon rolling and flight patterns due to the butyl fins. Still, aside from being the only hand-sewn ball, this is also the only ball made with a latex bladder on our list. The potential downside is the cotton lining which will get heavy when wet-though it is much softer and provides better responsiveness than either polyester or nylon.
 I’ll be honest right out of the gate in saying that I don’t have any experience with Senda.  But after looking at this ball, I will have to try one out soon!  Senda brings a very classic look to its ball, giving you a throwback to days gone by.  It has 32 panels and claims that it can be used outdoors, indoors, and on turf.  It is hand stitched with premium leather and has four layers of hybrid polyester and cotton linings between the cover and the bladder to help it last longer.  It is NHFS approved with its latex bladder, so it would be great for use in high school matches.  And especially considering it’s low cost.
If you have a youth player for whom you are purchasing this soccer ball, then take note that the Size 3 ball in this series is closer to a Size 4 ball. The weight and feel is still accurate, so it is good for home practice and play. The sizing just might make it difficult to take this ball to practice for some players. It doesn’t come with a 32-panel design, but it does have the traditional hexagon panels over the entire cover of the ball. This allows players to work on some ball movement skills, as well as placement drills, with relative ease at home.

During the game, there were two different balls used: the 12 panel Argentine players model like this one and a T-shaped model used by Uruguay. There’s speculation the use of the two different balls actually played a part in the outcome of the game. Argentina started using this 12-panel ball and entered the halftime with a 2-1 lead. However, the T-shaped model used in the second half worked towards Uruguay’s advantage as they won 4-2 by the end of the match.


Why do some soccer balls get bigger over time?  Many soccer balls do tend to get larger over time. Especially lower quality balls! This is due to the pressure of the bladder against the linings and cover.  Over time the material and stitching may stretch out causing the ball to become larger. Also, soccer ball abuse may cause the stitching to loosen and the ball to expand.
If you are looking for a good quality soccer ball, first you have to find out the best soccer ball brand. People love brands because good and trusted brand always provide us high quality products. Here we choose 10 best soccer ball brands from thousands of soccer ball brands to help you for buying the best soccer ball. To choose the best soccer ball brand for our list, we took help from soccer forum, soccer products review site, soccer blog and professional soccer player. Hope this guide will help you best.
All in all a street soccer ball needs to be rough and tough with all the attributes we discussed so far. Senda street soccer ball has fulfilled all these requirements, and met our expectation. We recommend you to buy this option if you want to play on street or hard surface. We found this as a good quality model with the proper construction as we discussed. The weight and bounce are also according to the requirement of a street soccer ball.
Ok i have read some of the negative reviews and i am sure there is the occasional faulty ball or the person who thinks they are buying a "regular match soccer ball"... that is not what this ball is designed for. It is an "ultra-durable" and nearly indestructible soccer ball. I have been buying these for 4 years and i give them away especially in Nicaragua. I would venture to say these balls are not designed for normal use in the USA on a manicured field... the flight, the touch is a little different... but if you play on hard surfaces, rocky roads, near barbed wire fences, in environments such as Nicaragua and other countries this is the best ball you can buy. I took my first ones to Nicaragua and left them and one was played with nearly every day for three years by some kids in a local
Inflate soccer balls to the pressure of 6-8 PPI (pounds per square inch). A pressure gauge will tell you when the air is enough. Under or over-inflating a soccer ball will shorten its life in one way or another. When under-inflated, the ball will not be resistant to the impact of kicks. On the other hand, over inflation will stretch out the bladder and put pressure on the panel stitches.
I bought three and used them for juggling, shooting practice and kicking against a wall. I juggled 90,000 times in 3 months, and shot many times on goal and kicked against walls. These are very durable. I look for durability in practice balls and these are superb. I wonder if Wilson has the newer cover pattern with the same internal structure in any model of ball. It would be wise to do that for the sake of staying current. I love the feel when kicking. Variable amounts of air can be used based on personal preference while practicing. A little less air allows a more forgiving bounce while juggling.
Finding the best soccer ball is important. You don’t use a ball only once and you keep on pushing and stepping on it all the time. Your typical soccer ball is not something that you usually handle with care and attention. So you need to buy something reliable that will not get cut with frequent use. At the same time, you need something that comes in the right size, weight and feel. When the ball is too heavy or too light you will not be able to use it properly.
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