Footballs have gone through a dramatic change over time. During medieval times balls were normally made from an outer shell of leather filled with cork shavings.[4] Another method of creating a ball was using animal bladders for the inside of the ball making it inflatable. However, these two styles of creating footballs made it easy for the ball to puncture and were inadequate for kicking. It was not until the 19th century that footballs developed into what a football looks like today.

Furthermore, cleaning the ball is a very important task that you must do on a regular basis. It could help you avoid water absorption issues, and it will help make it last longer. Clean a soccer ball with some mild soap and lukewarm water to maintain its performance. Don’t use harsh cleaning agents as this might damage the ball’s construction material. Storing the ball in low temperatures is ideal to avoid warping or water retention.

If you've ever noticed, a traditional soccer ball resembles a geodesic dome building. Such as the one designed by architect, Richard Buckminster Fuller. Thus the ball became called the Buckminster Ball. Or more simply, the "Buckeyball". The design is characterized by a pattern of twenty hexagon pieces, and twelve pentagon pieces, fitted together to create a perfect sphere. The soccer ball has undergone many design changes of various-shaped panels stitched together. But until the geodesic dome-like ball, it was never quite round enough to perform right. Manufacturers settled upon the modern thirty-two panel design, which enables the ball to roll and spin more evenly and smoothly. Which is probably why it's the most popular competition soccer ball on the market today. The Buckminister-style soccer ball was first sold in the 1950s, and debuted in the 1970 World Cup tournament.
I purchased light-up-soccer ball for my grandson for his father's birthday (Brooks Bowers) who has officiated games, played games and loved soccer for many years. And I have a picture of my grandson (Kieran) smiling at the rolling lighted ball after he kicked it. I thought it a well made, worked as it arrived with batteries already installed and a wonderful gift. To my surprise my grandson at age 3 is already attending soccer camps for young children.
Regardless of how popular the soccer ball is, this is also one of the most durable soccer balls that we reviewed. This starts with the casing, which is made out of PVC. While this is not the best material for touch, PVC is one of the most durable materials used for soccer ball casings. On top of the casing, the lining of the Wilson soccer ball is made of nylon that is stronger than the commonly used polyester alternative. Combined, the nylon and PVC also make this the most water-resistant soccer ball on our list.
Like many soccer balls that we reviewed, whenever a manufacturer makes it a point to offer an incredibly durable soccer ball, they ultimately make a soccer ball that is not very responsive. This is the case with the Wilson as well and is primarily a result of the materials chose. The PVC casing and nylon lining might be incredibly durable, but they do not offer much give. Aside from reducing the ball’s responsiveness, this also makes the Wilson a bit more painful to kick for long periods.
During the 1900s, footballs were made out of rubber and leather which was perfect for bouncing and kicking the ball; however, when heading the football (hitting it with the player's head) it was usually painful. This problem was most probably due to water absorption of the leather from rain, which caused a considerable increase in weight, causing head or neck injury. By around 2017, this had also been associated with dementia in former players.[8][9] Another problem of early footballs was that they deteriorated quickly, as the leather used in manufacturing the footballs varied in thickness and in quality.[6]
The size 1 is a mini ball. Thus you’ll need to check with your local league to know the size requirements before making a purchase. The MLS Glider has a unique TPU exterior material that resists abrasion and a butyl bladder that will keep it in shape and inflated for a long time. It is machine stitched and also has nylon wound carcass inside for durability and long-lasting performance.

Adidas spared little expense with this soccer ball and made sure that the materials used could pass almost any standard for grass fields. First, the casing is made of polyurethane, providing a great balance between responsiveness and durability-though they further increased the responsiveness with 3D textures. The bladder is made out of butyl, so you will not have to worry about constantly reinflating it, while the ball is lined with soft and water-resistant polyester.
You can’t have a soccer game without a ball and soccerloco offers a huge selection of sale priced soccer balls for practice and play. We feature themed balls from some of your favorite clubs, giving you the opportunity to show your team pride every time you hit the pitch. Remember that you don’t have to sacrifice quality for cost though. We offer great deals on balls that are designed to last.
For those taking their game to the next level, it’s important to train with a ball similar to what is used for your matches. Your passing, shooting and general foot skills will be different for lighter soccer balls made with a premium bladder like latex. Try out an NFHS approved ball which is used for some club, high school, and college teams. To be NFHS approved, the soccer ball needs to:
Select's attention to detail can be found in the ball's handy work and composition. It comes in nine different colors, including bright orange and bright yellow, which are perfect for training in semi-darkness. The 1.5mm PU cover is hand-stitched and textured for the brighter colors, adding durability. The design also aides turf play by zeroing in on control and resistance.
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