Why do I always have to pump up even expensive balls? Many balls use bladders made out of latex. Natural Latex Rubber bladders offer the softest feel and response, but do not provide the best air retention. Micro pores slowly let air escape. Balls with natural rubber bladders need to be re-inflated more often than balls with butyl bladders. Even after one or two days, the latex bladder will leak enough air so that you will have to inflate the ball back to recommended pressure. Some balls use carbon-latex bladders in which the carbon powder helps to close the micro pores. Soccer balls with carbon latex bladders usually increase air retention to approximately one week. Of course, check the ball for punctures that may cause the air to leak out.
The contours and grooves on the NIKE Strike Soccer Ball give it a unique surface that is textured and designed for ball handling. 6 color patterns and 3 different sizes make it a ‘jack of all trades’ ball that can entertain any age group. The power graphic adorning the side with the signature swoosh makes tracking the ball a breeze no matter how fast it is moving.
We found that the feeling of this ball was a bit harder than other soccer balls at this price point. This doesn’t affect the performance of the ball, as the movements were accurate and authentic when struck. The weight does tend to affect the foot and ankle over time, causing a bit of soreness after continuous play. It also features a machine-stitched construction that is accompanied by an internal nylon-wound carcass so the ball has an improved level of durability compared to other soccer balls at this price point.

In the year 1863, the first specifications for footballs were laid down by the Football Association. Previous to this, footballs were made out of inflated leather, with later leather coverings to help footballs maintain their shapes.[3] In 1872 the specifications were revised, and these rules have been left essentially unchanged as defined by the International Football Association Board. Differences in footballs created since this rule came into effect have been to do with the material used in their creation.
Cost efficient and slick, the Champion Sports Extreme Series Composite Soccer Ball has a composite that is a soft touch and forgiving on the foot after every kick. The TPU cover wards off scratches and damage while simultaneously never having its power compromised. Patented machine stitching handles the integrity of the panels, which are shiny and smooth.
This time there is no stitching to attach the panels, but they are thermally bonded. This is the interesting part. First, we wanted to see how it performs in the air for a free kick. You will find a decent, predictable trajectory. Although when you are knuckling, the result mainly depends on your skill and the air direction, a ball plays a vital role as well to help your process of a successful knuckle shot.

The outside of the soccer ball is typically made from one of two materials: PVC or Polyurethane.  PVC is much more affordable and durable, and these are typically seen in training soccer balls because training balls go through much more of a continuous beating.  Polyurethane balls are usually even softer than PVC balls and its ability to go where you want it to go is much better than the PVC balls.  As a result, these are typically higher-end balls.  However, there are still various ways to construct them, and not all PVC or polyurethane balls are created the same.  Glossy coatings, which are very popular in the public fields with the kids and adults alike, are also very useful because they help reduce scuffing and the intake of water.
Soccer — or football as it's known around the world — is arguably the most loved sport on Earth. Although Americans still aren't as enamored of the sport as the rest of the world is, teams around the country are stealing hearts and minds, and Americans are getting into the game. For years, soccer has been a sport played by kids, college students, and ex-pats, but it's now being cheered in stadiums and watched on national TV.
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