Adidas is probably one of the most famous brands for sports gear. They produce quality sports gear for different athletic needs but their soccer balls are of exceptional quality. For several decades FIFA has considered Adidas to be its official soccer ball brand. Adidas keeps on improving the balls they provide to the world’s most acclaimed soccer players. Like FIFA, Adidas also manufactures quality soccer ball for Olympic game and UEFA Champions League. So we keep Adidas at top of our list.
This is what the majority of quality soccer balls are made out of. It offers a great blend of durability and responsiveness and is the material most commonly used by professional leagues for their game balls. In fact, FIFA uses polyurethane, or PU, exclusively for their game balls. One thing that allows PU to stand out above many of the other materials is its versatility.
Adidas says its design was motivated by Russia's urban landscapes. It uses textured graphics and a metallic sheen to bring a modern look to the classic design. The ball is made of six panels of thermally bonded TPU and about 15% silicone. The materials allow for better trajectory, accuracy, responsiveness, and low water absorption. It also feels well-padded and slightly lighter than previous match balls.
The bladder, or the inside, of the soccer ball, is also very important to talk about.  There are typically only two choices that they are made out of butyl and latex.  The higher-end balls usually are latex while butyl is typically meant for training balls.  However, butyl is much better at keeping the air and shape of the ball for longer periods!   
Select's attention to detail can be found in the ball's handy work and composition. It comes in nine different colors, including bright orange and bright yellow, which are perfect for training in semi-darkness. The 1.5mm PU cover is hand-stitched and textured for the brighter colors, adding durability. The design also aides turf play by zeroing in on control and resistance.
I purchased the soccer ball for my son as a gift. It came deflated so we filled it with air before boxing it. Upon opening it, it was deflated. It only held air for a few hours. I contacted the company and they immediately shipped out a new one without hassle that is holding air just fine. (I was very pleased with how prompt and pleasant they were!) It lights up very bright when hit or bounced and turns off on its own after a little while of not being hit or bounced. My kids all love it and play with it nightly. It is not stitched as a real soccer ball is, but is more of a heat fused soft plastic. It holds up just fine though to my 13 year old soccer player's kicks. We are all enjoying playing with it and happy with our purchase.
In the end, the winner was fairly clear to us. Amongst all of these soccer balls, it appears that the best in this case, was the last one that we looked at Adidas MLS Top Glider Soccer Ball. When comparing all of the products side by side it just appears that in terms of design, gameplay, and durability that this one stood out amongst the rest. It has a ton of great reviews and positive customer feedback, so it appears that the vast majority of soccer players and customers were really happy with this ball.
As I mentioned above there are thousands of ball that you can choose from, but they are not all good and also we are here focused on best soccer balls under $100. If I would like to make a full review, I would have to buy a lot of balls and test all of them, but this unfortunately is not possible, because I don’t have so much money. Here comes out my experience during my career and other recommendations.

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The interior of the 1GK USA is a bit more mixed in terms of quality than the exterior is. However, the materials used are explicitly designed to increase the ball’s responsiveness-likely to make up for its uncommon rolling and flight patterns due to the butyl fins. Still, aside from being the only hand-sewn ball, this is also the only ball made with a latex bladder on our list. The potential downside is the cotton lining which will get heavy when wet-though it is much softer and provides better responsiveness than either polyester or nylon.

The outside of the soccer ball is typically made from one of two materials: PVC or Polyurethane.  PVC is much more affordable and durable, and these are typically seen in training soccer balls because training balls go through much more of a continuous beating.  Polyurethane balls are usually even softer than PVC balls and its ability to go where you want it to go is much better than the PVC balls.  As a result, these are typically higher-end balls.  However, there are still various ways to construct them, and not all PVC or polyurethane balls are created the same.  Glossy coatings, which are very popular in the public fields with the kids and adults alike, are also very useful because they help reduce scuffing and the intake of water.


The first edition of our newly developed dual bonded production method is used in the new soccer ball called BLAZE DB. The construction of this ball consists of a PU-material laminated with 3 mm foam. Next, two layers of textile underlining are laminated to the foam layer to add stability. The panels are then 3D printed with 3mm edge glue and stitched by hand, In the heat mold the glue is activated to hide the stitches. Next, the seam sealing is done by hand. The glue in the seams reduces the water uptake significantly. The bladder inside is a SR-bladder with excellent air retention. The result is a soccer ball with both stability, control and a softer touch compared to other balls in the range.
This match ball is an updated version of the popular Nike Ordem Professional soccer ball. Its goal is to withstand high-level play. A fuse-welded synthetic leather casing is optimal for touch and response. It also has a restricted six-wing carbon latex bladder for maximum air retention and explosiveness. The wrapped bladder also gives it a perfectly round shape, touch, and bounce. High contrast graphic design creates better visibility for this match soccer ball. Overall, this official match soccer ball boasts of 40% synthetic leather, 30% rubber, 20% polyester, and 10% cotton.
This ball has been through all of the hazards that kids can dream up. Dribbling the ball on pavement walking to the car, practicing shots against a brick school, being used as a seat, heavy use at practice, and its frequent selection as the game ball. With all of that, it still looks great with very little wear and tear. Could still pass as a new ball from a few feet away. It's held it's pressure very well. The outer shell texture allows good grip without being to soft or too hard.
In early FIFA World Cups, match balls were mostly provided by the hosts from local suppliers. Records indicate a variety of models being used within individual tournaments and even, on some occasions, individual games. Over time, FIFA took more control over the choice of ball used. Since 1970 Adidas have supplied official match balls for every tournament.[19]

During the game, there were two different balls used: the 12 panel Argentine players model like this one and a T-shaped model used by Uruguay. There’s speculation the use of the two different balls actually played a part in the outcome of the game. Argentina started using this 12-panel ball and entered the halftime with a 2-1 lead. However, the T-shaped model used in the second half worked towards Uruguay’s advantage as they won 4-2 by the end of the match.
The ball has good texture. It seems to hold air pretty well. The design is cool and is definitely one that is not seen on the pitch or practice field normally. I only have concern that a few of the patches on the ball are not flush with the others. 2 of the small panels are a little raised than the others where the seems meet. When my son and I pass the ball on a perfect synthetic field, it seems to jump just slightly, but it could be in my head since I have seen the seems not level to each other in a few spots on the ball. Mine may be abnormal. Other than that, the ball seems very well made. It even makes the right noises when kicked hard. Overall pretty satisfied.
Latex bladders are used in high-quality balls. These kind of bladders are soft and provide good feeling. They offer better response and bounce than Butyl bladders, but the downside of this kind of bladder is they don’t hold the air for too long. As a result, they require filling more frequently. Air escapes due to micropores on the cover, but nowadays some balls are constructed with carbon latex bladder to help to close these micropores. As a result, the balls can hold air for a longer period.

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Adidas says its design was motivated by Russia's urban landscapes. It uses textured graphics and a metallic sheen to bring a modern look to the classic design. The ball is made of six panels of thermally bonded TPU and about 15% silicone. The materials allow for better trajectory, accuracy, responsiveness, and low water absorption. It also feels well-padded and slightly lighter than previous match balls.
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