Looking for a decent soccer ball? The time was when you were looking for a soccer ball you just popped into your local toy store, paid a few dollars and headed off to the local park. Times have changed and, today, soccer is big business as is the market in soccer balls. With so many manufacturers making so many claims about their latest high-tech ball, just how do you find the best soccer ball available in your price range?
Mikasa comes in green, purple, red, and black shades. Besides, there is a size 3, 4 and 5 so you can always buy one depending on your unique needs. It has a one year warranty for your peace of mind. If you’re looking for a new soccer ball to add to your soccer equipment, then the Mikasa Serious Soccer Ball is the right model for you. Moreover, this ball has a deluxe durable cushioned cover stitched with synthetic leather guaranteeing long term use. It has a butyl bladder that ensures maximum air retention thus making it always ready for action.

Sizing is very important in selecting a soccer ball.  For the purposes of this article, I will mostly concentrate on size 5 outdoor soccer balls, but I will quickly go over the various sizes and let you know what they are used for.  Size 1 soccer balls, or skill balls (also known as mini balls), are primarily used by youth players that are just being introduced to the game.  These are typically 1-3-year-olds.  Another use for Size 1 balls is for older players to learn to juggle.  It is much harder to juggle a size 1, so instead of using a hacky sack, they use a skill ball.  This is done because the texture and materials are similar.  Size 3 balls are slightly bigger than size 1 and are used for ages four through seven.  They do this so that the ball isn’t too big in comparison to the players.  Size 4 balls are used for age eight through eleven.  Size 4s are smaller than size 5, which is used for everyone past the age of eleven.  This is the same size that the professionals use.  Making sure that you have the proper ball is just as important as picking out which materials one has.
This is the best ball ever made for dogs, especially large dogs who can usually rip a ball apart in a matter of minutes, like mine. This is our second one, the first one we had for over 2 years and my pit bull put so many teeth marks in this ball and it never went flat. The pump end eventually fell out and it still stayed round and would bounce. We only had to buy another one because my crazy dog liked to throw it up in the air and it went over the back fence and another dog (or kid) decided to take it home. I also like that I buy one for my dog, and a kid somewhere gets one too. I will never own another brand of ball for my dogs.

It depends on its intended use. Soccer ball casings are made from three kinds of synthetic materials. Polyvinyl carbonate (PVC) which is what most less expensive training balls are made from, Polyurethane (PU) which is the preferred ball for soccer tournaments, and a combination of the two. There are also foam and rubber training soccer balls for kids. Some kids' soccer balls are made of 100 percent thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU), which is a kind of foamy casing material so the ball is very soft. There are greater and lesser grades of each kind of material. PU-covered balls are generally softer, livelier, and have a better feel to them, and are what most people seek when looking for a optimal performing soccer ball.
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Our main intention of discussing the different types of balls is to educate you so that you can buy the right product. For example using practice balls on the street will bring you no good but some awful experiences as the ball will not last long. Similarly, an indoor soccer ball is not good to play on a beach. Keep this in mind when buying, and using a ball.
During the 1900s, footballs were made out of rubber and leather which was perfect for bouncing and kicking the ball; however, when heading the football (hitting it with the player's head) it was usually painful. This problem was most probably due to water absorption of the leather from rain, which caused a considerable increase in weight, causing head or neck injury. By around 2017, this had also been associated with dementia in former players.[8][9] Another problem of early footballs was that they deteriorated quickly, as the leather used in manufacturing the footballs varied in thickness and in quality.[6]

As I mentioned above there are thousands of ball that you can choose from, but they are not all good and also we are here focused on best soccer balls under $100. If I would like to make a full review, I would have to buy a lot of balls and test all of them, but this unfortunately is not possible, because I don’t have so much money. Here comes out my experience during my career and other recommendations.
The ball has good texture. It seems to hold air pretty well. The design is cool and is definitely one that is not seen on the pitch or practice field normally. I only have concern that a few of the patches on the ball are not flush with the others. 2 of the small panels are a little raised than the others where the seems meet. When my son and I pass the ball on a perfect synthetic field, it seems to jump just slightly, but it could be in my head since I have seen the seems not level to each other in a few spots on the ball. Mine may be abnormal. Other than that, the ball seems very well made. It even makes the right noises when kicked hard. Overall pretty satisfied.
During the game, there were two different balls used: the 12 panel Argentine players model like this one and a T-shaped model used by Uruguay. There’s speculation the use of the two different balls actually played a part in the outcome of the game. Argentina started using this 12-panel ball and entered the halftime with a 2-1 lead. However, the T-shaped model used in the second half worked towards Uruguay’s advantage as they won 4-2 by the end of the match.
Considering the positives previously mentioned, you might be wondering why we think this ball is only suited for practice-even if it is one of the best training soccer balls we have seen. This is because the Nike is not that responsive-at least, not compared to match soccer balls. This is largely because this ball uses a rubber bladder. This bladder is not responsive at all. On top of that, the foam lining and TPU casing are not the most responsive either-even if the latter does have texture to help increase its responsiveness.
Any Messi die-hard fan will want to buy this Adidas Soccer Ball. Aside from having a football ball from a collection of a world-top striker, you’ll add to your soccer equipment a high-quality model with great features that guarantee excellent performance in the playground. It is available in different shades and sizes that fit kids and children above 12 years old. The ball’s machine-stitched construction makes it quite durable, and the internal nylon wound carcass ensures long-lasting performance. Besides, it has a butyl bladder that ensures best air retention.

In 1838, Charles Goodyear introduced vulcanized rubber, which dramatically improved the football.[5] Vulcanisation is the treatment of rubber to give it certain qualities such as strength, elasticity, and resistance to solvents. Vulcanisation of rubber also helps the football resist moderate heat and cold. Vulcanisation helped create inflatable bladders that pressurize the outer panel arrangement of the football. Charles Goodyear's innovation increased the bounce ability of the ball and made it easier to kick. Most balls of this time had tanned leather with eighteen sections stitched together. These were arranged in six panels of three strips each.[6][7]
As always with Nike balls, the Ordem IV has an excellent feel, particularly when passing. The ball is also great for shooting due to Nike’s 360 degree sweet spot technology and the soft polyurethane outer material. It won’t deviate too much in the air due to the thermally-bonded pentagonal panel layout, so it’s perfect for training as well as games.
Early footballs began as animal bladders or stomachs that would easily fall apart if kicked too much. Improvements became possible in the 19th century with the introduction of rubber and discoveries of vulcanization by Charles Goodyear. The modern 32-panel ball design was developed in 1962 by Eigil Nielsen, and technological research continues today to develop footballs with improved performance. The 32-panel ball design was soon overcome by 24-panel balls as well as 42-panel balls, both of which improved performance compared to before, in 2007.[citation needed]
The downside? They’re expensive. Like, really expensive, depending on which one you get. Whether you really need one depends on your budget and how you’re going to be using your ball. For example, I use official match balls for practising freekicks because they fly through the air really nicely. However, I don’t use them for training because if I lose my ball I’ll be set back $100-$300.
A quick inspection of the construction of the ball might help you make a quick decision. The first thing that you should look at is the panel of the ball. A soccer ball that has panels sewn together is a better choice than the ones that are glued together. The panels of a premium ball are stitched by hand while those of a lower quality are machine stitched.

It came in a large box to accommodate the ball packaging. It comes semi deflated, so it needed some pumping before throwing it out to the kids to test out for the day. They loved the feel and control. Now, I think some was in their heads from knowing it was an actual ball the tis used for the pros, the text of the outside and the material did seem to give them better control over a $30 ball
Thanks to technology, finding a soccer ball is easy. Simply go online, research on the best balls out there, narrow down your search the top 10, 5 or 3 then read the reviews of people who have actually used them before. Thereafter, you can weigh the pros and cons to determine which ball is the best pick for you. The top 3 places to research on are:
Actual match balls should be of awesome quality.. I was happy to get the chance to review this size 5 match ball from the 2017 Confederations Cup Collection that was used in Russia. With the majority being white and the splashes of red with grey it stands out both on the shelf and on the field when it spins (a plus or x symbol depending on how you turn it)..

Latex bladders are one of the best materials when it comes to ball construction. However, with latex bladders, air won’t last as long as butyl bladders and will need more attention for proper inflation. Butyl-blend bladders hold in the air much better, but they are harder and less receptive in play. Mid-priced balls will usually have a mix of butyl and rubber.


The inner lining and the bladder are some of the key components of a soccer ball’s construction. These components are the factors that give control to the shape and the feel of a soccer ball. The usual match soccer ball has four layers of a blended polyester and cotton material in its lining, while mid-range ones have two cotton and polyester layers.
7. When you are buying online this is easier, because you have ratings and comments on many stores out there. It is good to look at top rated soccer balls or best selling soccer balls. Another good source to do is by visiting soccer forums where people talk about different things and there can be also a board/post about soccer balls, what they think, their experience etc.
Built for durability, recreation balls are made of soft synthetic materials for play on nearly any field. Typically, these balls are slightly heavier for beginner’s slower play, yet, competitors of all skill levels use these balls for practice and recreation on hard turf fields due to their resilience. Machine-stitching is the most stand-out visual difference between match balls and training balls and it offers a consistent touch for any player.
Please note, there are only 3 sizes available for this model; size 5, size 4, and size 3. So it is crucial that if you are looking for size 2 or size 1, then this is not an option for you. So, choose the right size before buying so that you don’t regret after receiving the purchase. If you are not sure which size means what then click here to read our guideline.
If you have a youth player for whom you are purchasing this soccer ball, then take note that the Size 3 ball in this series is closer to a Size 4 ball. The weight and feel is still accurate, so it is good for home practice and play. The sizing just might make it difficult to take this ball to practice for some players. It doesn’t come with a 32-panel design, but it does have the traditional hexagon panels over the entire cover of the ball. This allows players to work on some ball movement skills, as well as placement drills, with relative ease at home.
So it is now clear to you that you won’t have to worry about the air retention capability, durability. 

Now, how good is the playability? Well, in terms of rebounding, this ball performs almost like a standard ball but obviously not exactly like standard balls. Having said that, we must say the rebound is enough for recreational play and practicing purpose. You will also find this ball a bit heavier than standard balls during the shots. That is why we don’t suggest you use this option for tournament play.
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