This is a FIFA tested and approved ball so you can trust its quality and performance. For starters, it has 20 panels which facilitate control of the ball. Additionally, the casing uses polyurethane material which is one of the strongest soccer ball casings available. Unlike other professional soccer balls, this one uses Puma’s latest stress-free dimple technology. Just like any other high-quality ball, it will require frequent inflation compared to ordinary practice balls. This ball features the Puma Airlock Valve Technology (PAL) which facilitates proper airlock technology.
Size 5 is the official size for professional matches. Therefore, this ball is only available in this size. Do not use this soccer ball on concreted areas. Its unique rubber uses Puma Airlock Valve Technology (PAL) in order to facilitate proper airlock technology. This ball features Perimeter Balance Technology (PBT) which enables it to maintain impressive flight characteristics.
On the other hand, replicas (sometimes called training balls or gliders) are designed to be just like the official match balls but are much cheaper. Their panels are often stitched rather than thermally-bonded and are made of a different material. However, they’re not necessarily less durable than official match balls. So, they’re the recommended option for most players.
A football, soccer ball, or association football ball is the ball used in the sport of association football. The name of the ball varies according to whether the sport is called "football", "soccer", or "association football". The ball's spherical shape, as well as its size, weight, and material composition, are specified by Law 2 of the Laws of the Game maintained by the International Football Association Board. Additional, more stringent, standards are specified by FIFA and subordinate governing bodies for the balls used in the competitions they sanction.

There are several different materials and methods of construction used in soccer balls. Typically, Polyurethane casings are preferred as they’re often seamless and thermally bonded for premium play and long-lasting durability. However, many of the hand-stitched options are also very durable. The least durable options tend to be lower in price and machine stitched.
This is a decision being made by a league operator or manager of some sort, this section is important for you.  For the individual, there isn’t much of a determination here.  If you want something really nice like the pros, go premium.  But if not, then you probably will just want to go with a training ball.  But for people equipping their teams with materials, this is a decision that needs to be taken seriously.  I would suggest that recreational leagues stick with training match balls, even for matches.  The number of kicks that the ball will get and the improper technique will cause headaches for you if you decide to buy premium balls.  For high schools, I suggest just regular match balls as many are still learning the basics of the game and many teams simply play “kickball” at that age.  For college teams, semi-pros, serious travel clubs, and of course, professional teams, I suggest premium match balls for play!
There are a lot of options available in the market. But before buying one, you need to ask yourself, whether you are going to use it for practice, official match, indoor playing, street playing or playing on the beach. You also need to know the actual size you need. We tried to cover all these topics including the construction of a ball so that you have the idea of the different materials that are used to make it, and which material plays what type of role in the performance of your best buddy on the ground. Hope you enjoyed reading our detail reviews and soccer ball buying guide. Now it’s your turn to take the right decision.
It depends on its intended use. Soccer ball casings are made from three kinds of synthetic materials. Polyvinyl carbonate (PVC) which is what most less expensive training balls are made from, Polyurethane (PU) which is the preferred ball for soccer tournaments, and a combination of the two. There are also foam and rubber training soccer balls for kids. Some kids' soccer balls are made of 100 percent thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU), which is a kind of foamy casing material so the ball is very soft. There are greater and lesser grades of each kind of material. PU-covered balls are generally softer, livelier, and have a better feel to them, and are what most people seek when looking for a optimal performing soccer ball.
Bend-It is particularly proud of how this ball helps you perfect the Knuckleball movement. Now, I didn’t know much about this particular soccer move but it’s a skill worth acquiring! If you hit the ball just right for a Knuckleball kick, your ball will head on a (seemingly unpredictable) zigzag pattern, making it harder to block by the goalie. The Bend-It ball uses their VPM technology to help users perfect this movement during their training.
Now let’s talk a bit about what is it that they are made of and sizes and it’s importance. Soccer is the best way to learn physics as you learn to control a ball’s movement, all the while studying the force you need to exert to get to that optimal point. Specially for a professional player or someone who is on the path to it. They must know ins and out while they learn to control it.
For those taking their game to the next level, it’s important to train with a ball similar to what is used for your matches. Your passing, shooting and general foot skills will be different for lighter soccer balls made with a premium bladder like latex. Try out an NFHS approved ball which is used for some club, high school, and college teams. To be NFHS approved, the soccer ball needs to:

Despite having so many good reviews from the users, why aren’t we keeping Wilson traditional ball on our list? It is because we strongly think Wilson is specialized in making tennis equipment. On the other hand, this model did not meet our expectation. This model seems too heavy to us, and overall feel was not too good. That is why we are not recommending you to go for this option. But obviously, the final decision is yours. So many people are still buying this 🙂

Latex bladders are one of the best materials when it comes to ball construction. However, with latex bladders, air won’t last as long as butyl bladders and will need more attention for proper inflation. Butyl-blend bladders hold in the air much better, but they are harder and less receptive in play. Mid-priced balls will usually have a mix of butyl and rubber. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c1SVcjYY6TE
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