Tachikara ball is sold deflated at a reasonable price that is friendly to your pocket. The orange and white size-three ball is made of leather and machine-stitched making it very durable. It is the ideal ball for PE classes, for warm-ups, camps, and recreational play. This new soccer ball with butyl bladder is a great all around youth football ball.

In the year 1863, the first specifications for footballs were laid down by the Football Association. Previous to this, footballs were made out of inflated leather, with later leather coverings to help footballs maintain their shapes.[3] In 1872 the specifications were revised, and these rules have been left essentially unchanged as defined by the International Football Association Board. Differences in footballs created since this rule came into effect have been to do with the material used in their creation.
This is much like the kind of balls that I often buy and play with.  This is a training ball, but don’t let that fool you into thinking that means it is low quality. It is machine stitched, meaning it is mass-produced and has a nylon interior, making the ball last a long time as you practice and do your daily drills.  It also has a butyl bladder and is polyurethane so that it will stay inflated longer.  It has a really catchy green and black design and I’m sure all the kids would absolutely love to have this ball (or two) for the great price!
Bought this as a birthday gift for a 10-yr old boy who loves soccer. The ball is made of a durable rubber material, but it is official weight and size for those who are wondering. The rubber exterior gives the ball more bounce than a typical "official" soccer ball, but IMO it makes the ball more fun to kick around as well as more durable. There are 2 LED lights inside the ball which illuminate when the ball is kicked or tossed onto the ground. LED's shut off automatically after about a minute of inactivity which helps conserve the batteries. No more calling off the soccer game when the sun sets, this ball makes it possible to play in pitch dark conditions and is a blast to kick around. Fun for all ages, kids as well as adults. Great buy, 5 stars.
This is a decision being made by a league operator or manager of some sort, this section is important for you.  For the individual, there isn’t much of a determination here.  If you want something really nice like the pros, go premium.  But if not, then you probably will just want to go with a training ball.  But for people equipping their teams with materials, this is a decision that needs to be taken seriously.  I would suggest that recreational leagues stick with training match balls, even for matches.  The number of kicks that the ball will get and the improper technique will cause headaches for you if you decide to buy premium balls.  For high schools, I suggest just regular match balls as many are still learning the basics of the game and many teams simply play “kickball” at that age.  For college teams, semi-pros, serious travel clubs, and of course, professional teams, I suggest premium match balls for play!
It depends on its intended use. Soccer ball casings are made from three kinds of synthetic materials. Polyvinyl carbonate (PVC) which is what most less expensive training balls are made from, Polyurethane (PU) which is the preferred ball for soccer tournaments, and a combination of the two. There are also foam and rubber training soccer balls for kids. Some kids' soccer balls are made of 100 percent thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU), which is a kind of foamy casing material so the ball is very soft. There are greater and lesser grades of each kind of material. PU-covered balls are generally softer, livelier, and have a better feel to them, and are what most people seek when looking for a optimal performing soccer ball.

Latex bladders are one of the best materials when it comes to ball construction. However, with latex bladders, air won’t last as long as butyl bladders and will need more attention for proper inflation. Butyl-blend bladders hold in the air much better, but they are harder and less receptive in play. Mid-priced balls will usually have a mix of butyl and rubber. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c1SVcjYY6TE
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