Training balls are ideal for training and recreational use. These are the least expensive and more durable compared to professional match balls as they are meant to be continuously used for an extended period of time. This type of ball is usually constructed with 4 or fewer layers. The casing is made of PVC which makes its quality lower compared to a professional match soccer ball. Usually, the panels of a practice ball are molded together and not stitched together. These type of balls can withstand rough surfaces such as; asphalt and concrete.
This type of ball is easy to distinguish because its outer material is similar to the material used on tennis balls. They normally are a size 5 and similar to the outdoor soccer ball. Indoor soccer balls are purposely designed with less rebound in order to accommodate turf and harder surfaces that cover the walls of an indoor soccer field and playing ground.
In early FIFA World Cups, match balls were mostly provided by the hosts from local suppliers. Records indicate a variety of models being used within individual tournaments and even, on some occasions, individual games. Over time, FIFA took more control over the choice of ball used. Since 1970 Adidas have supplied official match balls for every tournament.[19]

In 1838, Charles Goodyear introduced vulcanized rubber, which dramatically improved the football.[5] Vulcanisation is the treatment of rubber to give it certain qualities such as strength, elasticity, and resistance to solvents. Vulcanisation of rubber also helps the football resist moderate heat and cold. Vulcanisation helped create inflatable bladders that pressurize the outer panel arrangement of the football. Charles Goodyear's innovation increased the bounce ability of the ball and made it easier to kick. Most balls of this time had tanned leather with eighteen sections stitched together. These were arranged in six panels of three strips each.[6][7]
In 1937, the regulation soccer ball put on a little weight, increasing from 13-15 ounces to 14-16 ounces. Soccer balls used to be made exclusively of leather. Not so these days! Current technologies have come up with leather-like synthetic materials that are softer, more lightweight, water-proof, and perform as well if not better than leather soccer balls. As for the look, early soccer balls were tan but difficult to see from the stands; although white leather-washed soccer balls are known to have been used. White soccer balls replaced their tan predecessors in the 1950s, and were composed of 18 panels. Black spots were added to allow soccer players to track the ball's swerve. Today's soccer balls come in an array of colorful designs and styles to suit every player.

A quick inspection of the construction of the ball might help you make a quick decision. The first thing that you should look at is the panel of the ball. A soccer ball that has panels sewn together is a better choice than the ones that are glued together. The panels of a premium ball are stitched by hand while those of a lower quality are machine stitched.
In 1838, Charles Goodyear introduced vulcanized rubber, which dramatically improved the football.[5] Vulcanisation is the treatment of rubber to give it certain qualities such as strength, elasticity, and resistance to solvents. Vulcanisation of rubber also helps the football resist moderate heat and cold. Vulcanisation helped create inflatable bladders that pressurize the outer panel arrangement of the football. Charles Goodyear's innovation increased the bounce ability of the ball and made it easier to kick. Most balls of this time had tanned leather with eighteen sections stitched together. These were arranged in six panels of three strips each.[6][7]
The game of soccer has evolved greatly over the years and the ball has evolved with it.  In days past, defenses played with as many as six men back.  Then things changed around the 1950s to allow when many teams played four forwards at one time!  Now, we are in a period where we see (sometimes) one natural forward in a team.  The changes that have happened in the game have oftentimes been a result of the changes to the soccer ball itself.  Through its many changes, it has allowed teams to change strategies.
In terms of durability, you can’t really go past Select. The polyurethane cover on the Numero 10 is tough enough to withstand dog bites and general wear and tear, but still feels nice and soft when kicked. Although this ball is a bit more expensive than other replicas, it comes with a two year warranty for peace of mind when buying. It also retains its bounce very well over the years – perfect for practising volleys and clearances.

If you are all about playing soccer competitively or recreationally, you know how important it is that you have a great game ball for play. The thing is, buying a quality soccer ball can get really expensive, and it can be difficult to find a great soccer ball for a great price. So where do you start looking for finding a good soccer ball for a low price?
For the most part, the materials used with the GlowCity soccer ball are generally considered the worst materials by competitive players. Both the casing and the bladder are made of rubber. The only bright spot in terms of materials is the lining, which is made of wound nylon. While these materials are generally less desirable than many others are, they do have the advantage of making the GlowCity soccer ball one of the most durable that we reviewed.
What is the difference between a high quality soccer ball and a low quality soccer ball? When purchasing soccer balls, many people buy according to the price of the ball. If a ball is expensive, that meant that it is a high quality ball and if it was a low costing ball, the ball is a low quality. That is not always true. Many players, coaches, clubs and even professionals do not know what type of ball to buy for their particular needs.  Please go to the following Soccer Ball World page to start learning about the construction of the various types of soccer balls, click here.

Really liked the ball, great at first. But after a little over 2 hours worth of use i noticed that it already had some holes, after fiddling with it for a half hour i've come to the conclusion that its pointless to keep pumping air into it and threw it in the trash. The customer service was good though and they sent me a new one about a week after i complained.
Early footballs began as animal bladders or stomachs that would easily fall apart if kicked too much. Improvements became possible in the 19th century with the introduction of rubber and discoveries of vulcanization by Charles Goodyear. The modern 32-panel ball design was developed in 1962 by Eigil Nielsen, and technological research continues today to develop footballs with improved performance. The 32-panel ball design was soon overcome by 24-panel balls as well as 42-panel balls, both of which improved performance compared to before, in 2007.[citation needed]
Any Messi die-hard fan will want to buy this Adidas Soccer Ball. Aside from having a football ball from a collection of a world-top striker, you’ll add to your soccer equipment a high-quality model with great features that guarantee excellent performance in the playground. It is available in different shades and sizes that fit kids and children above 12 years old. The ball’s machine-stitched construction makes it quite durable, and the internal nylon wound carcass ensures long-lasting performance. Besides, it has a butyl bladder that ensures best air retention.
Outfitting a team? 1soccerstore.com also offers a variety of soccer balls for teams in multiple quantities so your team can train like the professionals and be ready to hit the pitch on game day. We offer a variety of packages for teams with quantity discount pricing and various soccer ball models to fit the budget and needs of your team. We offer the largest selection of soccer balls including adidas soccer balls and Nike soccer balls, as well as a variety of Sala balls for soccer training.
This is one of the best and most affordable soccer balls from Mikasa. Expect high performance without having to spend a fortune for it. For a training soccer ball, this one is quite soft hence ideal for foot dribbles and head-butting. This is due to its soft composite cover and the unique machine stitching panels. This is a factor that facilitates control for younger players. A keen look will tell that younger players usually find difficult to control hand-stitched soccer balls. It is available in three sizes; 3, 4 and 5 hence friendly to different users and different functions. The double stitching on the panels adds life to it as makes it more resistant to tear.

The most commonly used materials for casing are PolyUrethane(PU) and PolyVinyl Carbonate (PVC), synthetic leather or a combination of PU and PVC. You can distinguish the type of casing used by touch. Balls that uses PVC usually have a hard exterior but are cheap and durable. PU cased balls are softer to the touch, high in quality and more responsive than PVC balls. Synthetic leather balls offer increased control hence ideal for professional matches or high-level playing. You will also notice a glossy finish on all soccer balls. This comes in handy in minimizing scuffing and water damage to the balls.


Thank you very much for your exceptionally informative guide. It provides excellent detail around the composition of soccer balls, different types of balls on the market, and what balls appear to be the best on the market in each category. A really useful website that I have bookmarked for consideration when I am next in the market for a new soccer ball (which will be soon as my old champions league ball from several years ago is getting a bit tatty!)
×