These are used in international level matches and top league matches like UEFA Champions League, Italian Serie A, English Premier League, Spanish La Liga, Bundesliga, Major League Soccer. Not only these but also all the tournaments approved by FIFA. So you can easily understand that these are the highest quality balls with the highest level of air retention, shape, water absorption, trajectory, curve, and performance. Otherwise, FIFA would not have approved these balls.


This ball is a premium match ball from Adidas, whom I consider to be the best of the best at making soccer balls.  This is a high-visibility ball, coming in a bright orange, to help teams just in case of inclement conditions such as rain or possibly snow. This ball has the highest possible rating from FIFA because of its seamless makeup and its latex bladder which allow for excellent rebound in your shot.  The seamless panels also allow it to take in very little water, making this an excellent buy if you are looking for a premium match ball.
It depends on its intended use. Soccer ball casings are made from three kinds of synthetic materials. Polyvinyl carbonate (PVC) which is what most less expensive training balls are made from, Polyurethane (PU) which is the preferred ball for soccer tournaments, and a combination of the two. There are also foam and rubber training soccer balls for kids. Some kids' soccer balls are made of 100 percent thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU), which is a kind of foamy casing material so the ball is very soft. There are greater and lesser grades of each kind of material. PU-covered balls are generally softer, livelier, and have a better feel to them, and are what most people seek when looking for a optimal performing soccer ball.
Furthermore, cleaning the ball is a very important task that you must do on a regular basis. It could help you avoid water absorption issues, and it will help make it last longer. Clean a soccer ball with some mild soap and lukewarm water to maintain its performance. Don’t use harsh cleaning agents as this might damage the ball’s construction material. Storing the ball in low temperatures is ideal to avoid warping or water retention.
Latex bladders are used in high-quality balls. These kind of bladders are soft and provide good feeling. They offer better response and bounce than Butyl bladders, but the downside of this kind of bladder is they don’t hold the air for too long. As a result, they require filling more frequently. Air escapes due to micropores on the cover, but nowadays some balls are constructed with carbon latex bladder to help to close these micropores. As a result, the balls can hold air for a longer period.
Elements of the football that today are tested are the deformation of the football when it is kicked or when the ball hits a surface. Two styles of footballs have been tested by the Sports Technology Research Group of Wolfson School of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering in Loughborough University; these two models are called the Basic FE model and the Developed FE model of the football. The basic model considered the ball as being a spherical shell with isotropic material properties. The developed model also utilised isotropic material properties but included an additional stiffer stitching seam region.

This is exactly the niche that American Challenge’s Brasilia soccer ball is supposed to fill. With a combination of materials that offer a range of different qualities, the Brasilia is able to transition seamlessly from dirt and turf to an indoor court or even on the street. This begins with a casing that is made of TPU. This provides the requisite durability needed while still offering some responsiveness. On top of that, the glossy finish actually benefits this ball in these settings rather hindering it.

Much like the Adidas ball we saw earlier, this offering from Adidas is top-of-the-line.  This a premium match ball that also has received the highest rating from FIFA.  To get that rating, it passed tests on its weight, how it retains air, the shape, and how well it keeps water out.  It also has seamless panels like the Hi-Vis Champions League ball.  Although not a cheap ball, this is worth a look if you are interested I premium match balls.
Soccer balls have several panels that influence their flight characteristics and the amount of control a player can have while playing. International soccer competitions use a 32-panel ball. Major leagues use an 18-panel ball and indoor leagues use a 6-panel ball. High-end soccer balls have hand-stitched panels with a synthetic thread. A low-cost one for practice and training will usually have its panels glued together.
Our next soccer ball on the list is the DribbleUp Smart Soccer Ball. This ball is the second (and only other) “smart” ball on our list. Like the Adidas brand ball, this DribbleUp ball is designed for use with a smart device and application for training. There are a lot of features to love about this ball; however, it’s more expensive than the Adidas alternative.
A quick inspection of the construction of the ball might help you make a quick decision. The first thing that you should look at is the panel of the ball. A soccer ball that has panels sewn together is a better choice than the ones that are glued together. The panels of a premium ball are stitched by hand while those of a lower quality are machine stitched.

The ball has good texture. It seems to hold air pretty well. The design is cool and is definitely one that is not seen on the pitch or practice field normally. I only have concern that a few of the patches on the ball are not flush with the others. 2 of the small panels are a little raised than the others where the seems meet. When my son and I pass the ball on a perfect synthetic field, it seems to jump just slightly, but it could be in my head since I have seen the seems not level to each other in a few spots on the ball. Mine may be abnormal. Other than that, the ball seems very well made. It even makes the right noises when kicked hard. Overall pretty satisfied.

Crafted by Adidas, the Telstar 18 is the official ball of the FIFA World Cup. Drawing inspiration from the company's first World Cup match ball, which debuted at the 1970 tournament in Mexico, the new ball reimagines the 12 black panels on an otherwise white design. Fun fact: the iconic original black and white ball was made that way to be more visible for black-and-white TV viewers, and it was dubbed the "star of television."
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