This is a very special soccer ball which I’ll think you’ll fall in love with. At least that was the case with me. I must say that I don’t normally trust new comers in the industry of soccer equipment. I mostly prefer established companies like Adidas, Select or Brine. However, the guys at Bend-it (the company behind Kunckle-it) really changed my perspective.
This is a decision that your coach or manager get to decide for you if you are part of a team. Your own ball is one thing that you have control on. However, when it comes to what the team should play with, it is the manager’s job to pick which ball is the best, and what is appropriate for the team for training. Coaches usually stick to training match balls as they give the illusion of actual match balls.

There are several different materials and methods of construction used in soccer balls. Typically, Polyurethane casings are preferred as they’re often seamless and thermally bonded for premium play and long-lasting durability. However, many of the hand-stitched options are also very durable. The least durable options tend to be lower in price and machine stitched.

This can be used as a great option for goalkeeper training as well. Why? Look, you can hardly see the lines on this ball, hence you won’t be able to guess the direction by only seeing the spin of the ball. That means as a goalkeeper you will have to give full concentration to detect the direction of the sliding balls. This is obviously helpful if you are a goalkeeper, and looking for a sliding challenge.

Update: While this ball was ruined in 3 days of use, the customer service team contacted me quickly and offered to send another product to try from this company. I thought this was very generous and warrants another try. With 3 kids now in soccer, I will update this review upon receipt of the next ball. (I added a star to the rating because they seem to want to stand by their company.)
Crafted by Adidas, the Telstar 18 is the official ball of the FIFA World Cup. Drawing inspiration from the company's first World Cup match ball, which debuted at the 1970 tournament in Mexico, the new ball reimagines the 12 black panels on an otherwise white design. Fun fact: the iconic original black and white ball was made that way to be more visible for black-and-white TV viewers, and it was dubbed the "star of television."
×