I purchased the Knuckle It Pro soccer ball for my sons 12 th birthday in August of 2017. When I asked what he would like for his birthday he had mentioned this ball. I had never heard of it so I began doing research on the product. We had at least 4 soccer balls at home at the time so I wasn't sure I'd go with another ball. We have one of nearly every major brand ranging in price from $15-30. He had even received a $40 ball just months before for Christmas so I really didn't see the point in one more.
I bought three and used them for juggling, shooting practice and kicking against a wall. I juggled 90,000 times in 3 months, and shot many times on goal and kicked against walls. These are very durable. I look for durability in practice balls and these are superb. I wonder if Wilson has the newer cover pattern with the same internal structure in any model of ball. It would be wise to do that for the sake of staying current. I love the feel when kicking. Variable amounts of air can be used based on personal preference while practicing. A little less air allows a more forgiving bounce while juggling.
I decided to try to contact Kan Jam, since I was more interested in the possibility of an exchange than a return. In my experience, if a company will honor an exchange, some of the time, they won't require that you send the original product back. But I couldn't find any direct contact info for Kan Jam and decided to just open up a Return Request through Amazon. I did say in the comments that I would prefer an exchange over a return, but I
A ball is just a ball, right? Well, it’s not quite that simple any more. Some important things to consider are what the ball is constructed of, what material is used for the lining or bladder and, to state the obvious, the size of ball you require, which will depend on the ages of the players and the ball’s intended use, be it for training or match games.
Soccer ball covers are meant to protect the construction of a ball, and make it more durable and long lasting. Manufacturers use two types of materials, mainly polyurethane (PU) or polyvinyl carbonate (PVC). PVC is the cheaper and much affordable variant, but it is more durable than PU. It has scuff-resistance, which makes it perfect for training soccer balls. PU is used for match balls, since it is softer than a PVC soccer ball and tends to respond better to contact.
This is a decision that your coach or manager get to decide for you if you are part of a team. Your own ball is one thing that you have control on. However, when it comes to what the team should play with, it is the manager’s job to pick which ball is the best, and what is appropriate for the team for training. Coaches usually stick to training match balls as they give the illusion of actual match balls.
You'll be happy to know that our 20-60% discounts today on soccer balls and name brand soccer gear and clothing can really add up to large savings for Epic Sports customers. Whether your team is shopping for soccer balls, soccer jerseys, goals, nets, shoes, socks, cleats, uniforms, training DVDs, unique gifts, and much more, our team beats the competition. And so will yours when you save a lot of money on the right styles and the right equipment. Whether you're a serious team player in the US or internationally you'll always receive big scores on just about everything you need right here in our shop.
During the 1900s, footballs were made out of rubber and leather which was perfect for bouncing and kicking the ball; however, when heading the football (hitting it with the player's head) it was usually painful. This problem was most probably due to water absorption of the leather from rain, which caused a considerable increase in weight, causing head or neck injury. By around 2017, this had also been associated with dementia in former players.[8][9] Another problem of early footballs was that they deteriorated quickly, as the leather used in manufacturing the footballs varied in thickness and in quality.[6]
This is a very special soccer ball which I’ll think you’ll fall in love with. At least that was the case with me. I must say that I don’t normally trust new comers in the industry of soccer equipment. I mostly prefer established companies like Adidas, Select or Brine. However, the guys at Bend-it (the company behind Kunckle-it) really changed my perspective.
Crafted by Adidas, the Telstar 18 is the official ball of the FIFA World Cup. Drawing inspiration from the company's first World Cup match ball, which debuted at the 1970 tournament in Mexico, the new ball reimagines the 12 black panels on an otherwise white design. Fun fact: the iconic original black and white ball was made that way to be more visible for black-and-white TV viewers, and it was dubbed the "star of television."
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