During the game, there were two different balls used: the 12 panel Argentine players model like this one and a T-shaped model used by Uruguay. There’s speculation the use of the two different balls actually played a part in the outcome of the game. Argentina started using this 12-panel ball and entered the halftime with a 2-1 lead. However, the T-shaped model used in the second half worked towards Uruguay’s advantage as they won 4-2 by the end of the match.
Furthermore, cleaning the ball is a very important task that you must do on a regular basis. It could help you avoid water absorption issues, and it will help make it last longer. Clean a soccer ball with some mild soap and lukewarm water to maintain its performance. Don’t use harsh cleaning agents as this might damage the ball’s construction material. Storing the ball in low temperatures is ideal to avoid warping or water retention.
During the 1900s, footballs were made out of rubber and leather which was perfect for bouncing and kicking the ball; however, when heading the football (hitting it with the player's head) it was usually painful. This problem was most probably due to water absorption of the leather from rain, which caused a considerable increase in weight, causing head or neck injury. By around 2017, this had also been associated with dementia in former players.[8][9] Another problem of early footballs was that they deteriorated quickly, as the leather used in manufacturing the footballs varied in thickness and in quality.[6]
Of course, no one should truly expect this ball to be made for an organized league game since its primary selling point is that it glows in the dark. This soccer ball features two red LED lights that are powered by the same kinds of batteries used for watches. Even better, the batteries themselves are easy to change out and even have a specialized tool to assist in doing so. To prevent the batteries from running out too quickly, the ball is kick-activated and stays lit for 40 seconds.
Official Nike Merlin Match Ball used within the ACC division of NCAA collegiate soccer. This is a used ball with some minor scuffs and sharpie on the ball. The ball holds air perfectly and has no defects during play. This ball does not come with the original packaging as they come in bulk. The ball is too scuffed to be played during official games, so there are surplus between these and practice balls. This ball will ship deflated to make shipping cheaper. Will ship fast. No returns.
I got this as a gift for my son. He enjoys soccer and he can play till the sun goes down because he can no longer see the soccer ball. When i found this I was so excited that he'd be able to play soccer at night. When I received it, I followed the direction about removing the plastic and the tube with the batteries. It was so difficult putting that plastic back into the ball. The light worked after I replaced the batteries as instructed. When my son received it the light worked. He put the ball away to use at night, but night came and the light no longer turned on. What a disappointment .

Due to it being significantly softer than the other types of rubbers used for soccer ball bladders, latex is generally seen as the premier material. Though, this same perception may not hold as true for practice balls or even game balls at lower levels of competition. This is because latex bladders retain air worse than all of the other soccer ball bladder materials and will need to be re-inflated more often.


Much as we are grateful to use the latest technology in our balls, you still need the right soccer ball to add to your soccer equipment. Different things need to be put into consideration including but not limited to, the level of play, material, quality, and ball size. We’ve taken all these into account when preparing this list of the best football balls available on the 2018 market so be sure to read on.


This Bend-It soccer ball is designed with training in mind. It’s a regulation size 5 soccer ball which means you’ll train with the same weight and feel as the professionals! It offers a seamless, thermo-bonded surface that’s 100% Polyurethane. You can train with this ball for a long time without worrying about it wearing out prematurely. This design also means no matter how hard you play, your ball will maintain its perfectly round shape. So, when you train you are training with the same feel each time and are bound to perfect your moves!
Much like PU or TPU for soccer ball casings, rubber is considered the best of both worlds for soccer ball bladders when it comes to striking a balance between responsiveness and air retention. Oddly enough, this balance does not actually inspire a greater adoption by either manufacturers or players, and as such, soccer balls with rubber bladders are less popular.

Update (2 years post-purchase): Still love this ball and it's in its fifth season of use! I've just ordered another for our team since the fall season makes for darker and darker practices on our unlighted scrimmage field and we've come to rely on this ball so much. My teenagers use this ball at home all the time, including playing "soccer tennis" on hard surfaces and for banging against a brick wall (all of the print is long gone from the outer surface). We even took it to the beach this year. It never fails to get a reaction from people who see it bouncing around in the dark. I did have to replace one of the two lights, but they're available from GlowCity and are very reasonably priced (I purchased a couple of extra lights, just in case). I also bought a pack of 100


In early FIFA World Cups, match balls were mostly provided by the hosts from local suppliers. Records indicate a variety of models being used within individual tournaments and even, on some occasions, individual games. Over time, FIFA took more control over the choice of ball used. Since 1970 Adidas have supplied official match balls for every tournament.[19]
On the other hand, replicas (sometimes called training balls or gliders) are designed to be just like the official match balls but are much cheaper. Their panels are often stitched rather than thermally-bonded and are made of a different material. However, they’re not necessarily less durable than official match balls. So, they’re the recommended option for most players.
If you are unsure of which size to get your child, I will recommend what size I think based off real-world use. The size 3 is good for any child until about first grade or second grade, which is when a child should move into a size 4. The size 4 should last until they get to middle school (around 6th or 7th grade), and then they would move into the adult official size 5.
When it is about quality, these are almost same as premium match soccer balls but obviously not the same. To be exact, you can say official match soccer balls are positioning between premium match balls and training soccer balls regarding quality. That means these balls also offer an excellent level of air retention, shape, water absorption, curve, and performance. Although usually, they are not as durable as training balls but as a whole, they are very much durable.
The design of this ball is uniquely crafted for the 2016 year and is truly one of a kind. It’s design features are inspired by the MLS’ three pillars of Club, Country, and Community. As a result, this ball expertly blends the flags from each home country. The United States and Canada are represented with stars, stripes, and maple leaf decals on a white background. This soccer ball also comes imprinted with the MLS crest, Adidas logo, and the signature of the MLS commissioner, Don Garber.

I bought this soccer ball for my granddaughters for Christmas. It arrived inflated, which concerned me. My husband inflated it with no problem and it is just fine. The ball is bigger than I thought it would be, but that is because it is a size 5 and the girls use a size 4. I didn't see the different sizes when I ordered it. It does light up very nicely and the girls love it. They got outdoor soccer nets for Christmas and I thought this ball would be great as they play late in the day. They can't wait to put it to use.

A football, soccer ball, or association football ball is the ball used in the sport of association football. The name of the ball varies according to whether the sport is called "football", "soccer", or "association football". The ball's spherical shape, as well as its size, weight, and material composition, are specified by Law 2 of the Laws of the Game maintained by the International Football Association Board. Additional, more stringent, standards are specified by FIFA and subordinate governing bodies for the balls used in the competitions they sanction.


 I’ll be honest right out of the gate in saying that I don’t have any experience with Senda.  But after looking at this ball, I will have to try one out soon!  Senda brings a very classic look to its ball, giving you a throwback to days gone by.  It has 32 panels and claims that it can be used outdoors, indoors, and on turf.  It is hand stitched with premium leather and has four layers of hybrid polyester and cotton linings between the cover and the bladder to help it last longer.  It is NHFS approved with its latex bladder, so it would be great for use in high school matches.  And especially considering it’s low cost.
Our main intention of discussing the different types of balls is to educate you so that you can buy the right product. For example using practice balls on the street will bring you no good but some awful experiences as the ball will not last long. Similarly, an indoor soccer ball is not good to play on a beach. Keep this in mind when buying, and using a ball.
The game of soccer has evolved greatly over the years and the ball has evolved with it.  In days past, defenses played with as many as six men back.  Then things changed around the 1950s to allow when many teams played four forwards at one time!  Now, we are in a period where we see (sometimes) one natural forward in a team.  The changes that have happened in the game have oftentimes been a result of the changes to the soccer ball itself.  Through its many changes, it has allowed teams to change strategies.
The outer casing of a soccer ball is composed of panels made from synthetic materials, such as PVC, PU, or a combination, sewn or glued together. Soccer ball casings are rarely leather anymore, since leather tends to absorb moisture making the ball heavier and not perform as well. The number of panels or sections of the outer casing varies according to design. Most professional soccer balls are the 32-panel design. More panels mean a rounder and stabler ball, and a more accurate flight.
Sizing is very important in selecting a soccer ball.  For the purposes of this article, I will mostly concentrate on size 5 outdoor soccer balls, but I will quickly go over the various sizes and let you know what they are used for.  Size 1 soccer balls, or skill balls (also known as mini balls), are primarily used by youth players that are just being introduced to the game.  These are typically 1-3-year-olds.  Another use for Size 1 balls is for older players to learn to juggle.  It is much harder to juggle a size 1, so instead of using a hacky sack, they use a skill ball.  This is done because the texture and materials are similar.  Size 3 balls are slightly bigger than size 1 and are used for ages four through seven.  They do this so that the ball isn’t too big in comparison to the players.  Size 4 balls are used for age eight through eleven.  Size 4s are smaller than size 5, which is used for everyone past the age of eleven.  This is the same size that the professionals use.  Making sure that you have the proper ball is just as important as picking out which materials one has.
Excellent texture for a size 4 ball. I purchased this ball for my son who is playing in a U9 team. It's soft and many kids like this ball. On home games it is our game ball. It arrived properly inflated and 2 months later, I still have not had the need to add air. Expect faster wear and tear if your kid plays on concrete. :( I would recommend this ball.
I purchased the soccer ball for my son as a gift. It came deflated so we filled it with air before boxing it. Upon opening it, it was deflated. It only held air for a few hours. I contacted the company and they immediately shipped out a new one without hassle that is holding air just fine. (I was very pleased with how prompt and pleasant they were!) It lights up very bright when hit or bounced and turns off on its own after a little while of not being hit or bounced. My kids all love it and play with it nightly. It is not stitched as a real soccer ball is, but is more of a heat fused soft plastic. It holds up just fine though to my 13 year old soccer player's kicks. We are all enjoying playing with it and happy with our purchase.

There are a few variables to keep in mind. If you want to practice your skills and footwork, a size 1 ball is recommend. A size 3 ball is best suited for children ages 8 and younger, whereas a size 4 ball is best for ages 8-12, or a size 5 ball for ages 13 and up. With that in mind, many soccer leagues and clubs have their own specifications when it comes to ball size. If you play on a league, it is recommended to check their regulations first.

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