The game of soccer has evolved greatly over the years and the ball has evolved with it.  In days past, defenses played with as many as six men back.  Then things changed around the 1950s to allow when many teams played four forwards at one time!  Now, we are in a period where we see (sometimes) one natural forward in a team.  The changes that have happened in the game have oftentimes been a result of the changes to the soccer ball itself.  Through its many changes, it has allowed teams to change strategies.
It depends on its intended use. Soccer ball casings are made from three kinds of synthetic materials. Polyvinyl carbonate (PVC) which is what most less expensive training balls are made from, Polyurethane (PU) which is the preferred ball for soccer tournaments, and a combination of the two. There are also foam and rubber training soccer balls for kids. Some kids' soccer balls are made of 100 percent thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU), which is a kind of foamy casing material so the ball is very soft. There are greater and lesser grades of each kind of material. PU-covered balls are generally softer, livelier, and have a better feel to them, and are what most people seek when looking for a optimal performing soccer ball.

Official Nike Merlin Match Ball used within the ACC division of NCAA collegiate soccer. This is a used ball with some minor scuffs and sharpie on the ball. The ball holds air perfectly and has no defects during play. This ball does not come with the original packaging as they come in bulk. The ball is too scuffed to be played during official games, so there are surplus between these and practice balls. This ball will ship deflated to make shipping cheaper. Will ship fast. No returns.
In 1937, the regulation soccer ball put on a little weight, increasing from 13-15 ounces to 14-16 ounces. Soccer balls used to be made exclusively of leather. Not so these days! Current technologies have come up with leather-like synthetic materials that are softer, more lightweight, water-proof, and perform as well if not better than leather soccer balls. As for the look, early soccer balls were tan but difficult to see from the stands; although white leather-washed soccer balls are known to have been used. White soccer balls replaced their tan predecessors in the 1950s, and were composed of 18 panels. Black spots were added to allow soccer players to track the ball's swerve. Today's soccer balls come in an array of colorful designs and styles to suit every player.
The most commonly used materials for casing are PolyUrethane(PU) and PolyVinyl Carbonate (PVC), synthetic leather or a combination of PU and PVC. You can distinguish the type of casing used by touch. Balls that uses PVC usually have a hard exterior but are cheap and durable. PU cased balls are softer to the touch, high in quality and more responsive than PVC balls. Synthetic leather balls offer increased control hence ideal for professional matches or high-level playing. You will also notice a glossy finish on all soccer balls. This comes in handy in minimizing scuffing and water damage to the balls.
This is much like the kind of balls that I often buy and play with.  This is a training ball, but don’t let that fool you into thinking that means it is low quality. It is machine stitched, meaning it is mass-produced and has a nylon interior, making the ball last a long time as you practice and do your daily drills.  It also has a butyl bladder and is polyurethane so that it will stay inflated longer.  It has a really catchy green and black design and I’m sure all the kids would absolutely love to have this ball (or two) for the great price!
The fact that this ball was not only tested but used in 2016 Euro qualification matches makes it a trusted choice. Its graphics are minimal with the majority of the surface being white in color. A hint of red and silver streaks breaks the monotony of the white yet maintains a simplistic appeal which appeals to the simplistic users. The graphic designs go against the panels which gives it a unique appeal. Its casing uses 100% PU leather and the panels are thermal-bonded which makes the surface smooth. Its bladder uses butyl material which improves air retention. The surface of the ball provides lower water absorption which contributes to its durability and gives it a better feel.
Over time, many soccer balls tend to go out-of-round, especially if they are well-used. The Glider is designed to maintain its shape without losing air thanks to the firmness and consistency of the butyl bladder. Under regular use, we found that the air pressure was consistent enough that we didn’t need to add more air to the ball. If you play in organized soccer, then having consistency from the practice ball to the game ball is very important for skill development. The machine-stitched panels offer that experience for most players, even though the ball has the standard panel design.
My favorite best soccer ball under 100$ from the list above Italy evoPOWER 1 Statement Match ball. I like its design and I’m almost sure it has great quality and can give you best experience. I’m also a fan of Serie A league, so this is an extra plus at my decision. Above that it has some great recommendations, so this is my best soccer ball under $100.

When it comes to soccer ball bladders, you will generally opt for the material that provides the most responsive touch for the highest levels of play. This is because it is a simple matter to re-inflate a soccer ball not to mention the fact that most competitive leagues will have numerous balls on hand. If touch and responsiveness are your key bladder attribute, there is no other material better than latex.
Soccer ball covers are meant to protect the construction of a ball, and make it more durable and long lasting. Manufacturers use two types of materials, mainly polyurethane (PU) or polyvinyl carbonate (PVC). PVC is the cheaper and much affordable variant, but it is more durable than PU. It has scuff-resistance, which makes it perfect for training soccer balls. PU is used for match balls, since it is softer than a PVC soccer ball and tends to respond better to contact.

Whereas plenty of manufacturers that we reviewed opted to go with a soccer ball that was more durable than responsive, Mikasa takes the opposite approach and focuses primarily on the touch that their ball can provide. This is most apparent in the soccer ball’s choice of casing material. The synthetic leather casing of the Mikasa is by far the softest and naturally responsive-without the inclusion of texture-out of any other soccer ball we reviewed. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3OKagE2ZIRA
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