Enough learning on different aspects of soccer balls? Let’s have some fun then. We are going to give you our other specific reviews on different types of soccer balls so that you can choose the right option for you applying the knowledge you have just gathered. Obviously we suggest you to buy from the ones that we reviewed above. But you can consider the following ones as well.

Outside of PU and TPU, pretty much every other material used for a soccer ball’s casing will be specialized for either durability or responsiveness. When it comes to synthetic leather, the focus is also exclusively on responsiveness and this is by far the most responsive material used for a soccer ball’s casing. It is important to note that PU, TPU, and PVC are all often labeled as synthetic leather.


Match balls are constructed specifically for competition and the sport's high-level training. These balls feature higher quality materials and must conform to regulation standards of your league. Training and recreational soccer balls are designed to handle extended use on a variety of playing surfaces, often featuring a PVA casing for enhanced durability.
Today’s generation of the ball allows teams to be more accurate with their passing and their shots, leading to a myriad of strategies being employed.  Some simply wait and try to shoot from way outside because of the wall the ball flies.  Others use the ball on the ground.  Whichever way, we are certainly all lucky to be able to use today’s technology in our games!  There are a few things to consider when buying a soccer ball.  There are various sizes, materials, qualities, and levels of play which will help determine which one you need for your specific purposes.
In 1838, Charles Goodyear introduced vulcanized rubber, which dramatically improved the football.[5] Vulcanisation is the treatment of rubber to give it certain qualities such as strength, elasticity, and resistance to solvents. Vulcanisation of rubber also helps the football resist moderate heat and cold. Vulcanisation helped create inflatable bladders that pressurize the outer panel arrangement of the football. Charles Goodyear's innovation increased the bounce ability of the ball and made it easier to kick. Most balls of this time had tanned leather with eighteen sections stitched together. These were arranged in six panels of three strips each.[6][7]
I purchased the Knuckle It Pro soccer ball for my sons 12 th birthday in August of 2017. When I asked what he would like for his birthday he had mentioned this ball. I had never heard of it so I began doing research on the product. We had at least 4 soccer balls at home at the time so I wasn't sure I'd go with another ball. We have one of nearly every major brand ranging in price from $15-30. He had even received a $40 ball just months before for Christmas so I really didn't see the point in one more.
The downside? They’re expensive. Like, really expensive, depending on which one you get. Whether you really need one depends on your budget and how you’re going to be using your ball. For example, I use official match balls for practising freekicks because they fly through the air really nicely. However, I don’t use them for training because if I lose my ball I’ll be set back $100-$300.
Adidas says its design was motivated by Russia's urban landscapes. It uses textured graphics and a metallic sheen to bring a modern look to the classic design. The ball is made of six panels of thermally bonded TPU and about 15% silicone. The materials allow for better trajectory, accuracy, responsiveness, and low water absorption. It also feels well-padded and slightly lighter than previous match balls.
×