We found that the feeling of this ball was a bit harder than other soccer balls at this price point. This doesn’t affect the performance of the ball, as the movements were accurate and authentic when struck. The weight does tend to affect the foot and ankle over time, causing a bit of soreness after continuous play. It also features a machine-stitched construction that is accompanied by an internal nylon-wound carcass so the ball has an improved level of durability compared to other soccer balls at this price point.
Soccer ball covers are meant to protect the construction of a ball, and make it more durable and long lasting. Manufacturers use two types of materials, mainly polyurethane (PU) or polyvinyl carbonate (PVC). PVC is the cheaper and much affordable variant, but it is more durable than PU. It has scuff-resistance, which makes it perfect for training soccer balls. PU is used for match balls, since it is softer than a PVC soccer ball and tends to respond better to contact.
In the year 1863, the first specifications for footballs were laid down by the Football Association. Previous to this, footballs were made out of inflated leather, with later leather coverings to help footballs maintain their shapes.[3] In 1872 the specifications were revised, and these rules have been left essentially unchanged as defined by the International Football Association Board. Differences in footballs created since this rule came into effect have been to do with the material used in their creation.
Yesterday’s balls had stitches and seams in them like American footballs have!  They slowly transitioned away from that to the classic black and white soccer ball.  From there, we saw the invention of panels.  And finally today, we are left with the maneuverability of multi-panels and other technologies which allow the ball to fly quicker, bend more, and dip harder.  In addition to these changes, another simple fact that should be noted is that the fact has become softer over time.  This allows players to be able to kick the ball further and not risk injury.
What sets each soccer ball apart from another is the quality of the materials that are used in its construction. The lining, bladder, cover, and the quality of the overall craftsmanship will all influence the final cost of the soccer ball you’re looking at. Higher quality balls are usually bonded together to provide a superior shape retention experience and offer a truer flight.
Cost efficient and slick, the Champion Sports Extreme Series Composite Soccer Ball has a composite that is a soft touch and forgiving on the foot after every kick. The TPU cover wards off scratches and damage while simultaneously never having its power compromised. Patented machine stitching handles the integrity of the panels, which are shiny and smooth.

Soccer balls have several panels that influence their flight characteristics and the amount of control a player can have while playing. International soccer competitions use a 32-panel ball. Major leagues use an 18-panel ball and indoor leagues use a 6-panel ball. High-end soccer balls have hand-stitched panels with a synthetic thread. A low-cost one for practice and training will usually have its panels glued together.


Whereas plenty of manufacturers that we reviewed opted to go with a soccer ball that was more durable than responsive, Mikasa takes the opposite approach and focuses primarily on the touch that their ball can provide. This is most apparent in the soccer ball’s choice of casing material. The synthetic leather casing of the Mikasa is by far the softest and naturally responsive-without the inclusion of texture-out of any other soccer ball we reviewed. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3OKagE2ZIRA
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