When I buy a soccer ball at a local store, how do I know if I am buying a good soccer ball?  Ball material information on the packaging of the balls is minimal at best. Marketing hype is hard to understand. So people are very frustrated when buying soccer balls for their clubs, teams or own use. Parents of soccer players have always asked me about what type and where to buy soccer balls for their up and coming star. "Go to the local store and pick out one that is on sale" I would tell them. The only recommendation I could make was to check out soccer balls that I previously used and knew they were good quality. 
The cheaper balls only have two polyester layers on their lining. Soccer ball bladders can be made from two different kinds of materials. They can either be latex or butyl. A soccer ball bladder is a component of a soccer ball and it is tasked in containing the air that is within the ball. It also contributes to its shape and the ball’s receptiveness on the field.
To be honest, this ball’s a bit like a classic car, in that it’s awesome – when it works. The Jabulani is prone to valve issues, although they can be fixed. If you need something durable, we wouldn’t recommend this ball. However, if you’re looking to add an awesome ball to your collection – and you’ve got the cash – consider grabbing a Jabulani before they go extinct.
A soccer ball can look awesome, but if it lacks good response you're never going to fall in love with it. Your game really comes down to how well your ball performs. One trick you can do in the store to test a ball's performance is to give it a spin in the air. A well-balanced ball should spin smoothly. That will mean smooth sailing on the field. If you can, try it out. Try several of them until you find the one that feels just right.
Latex bladders are one of the best materials when it comes to ball construction. However, with latex bladders, air won’t last as long as butyl bladders and will need more attention for proper inflation. Butyl-blend bladders hold in the air much better, but they are harder and less receptive in play. Mid-priced balls will usually have a mix of butyl and rubber. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c1SVcjYY6TE
×