Looking for a decent soccer ball? The time was when you were looking for a soccer ball you just popped into your local toy store, paid a few dollars and headed off to the local park. Times have changed and, today, soccer is big business as is the market in soccer balls. With so many manufacturers making so many claims about their latest high-tech ball, just how do you find the best soccer ball available in your price range?


Some additional information worth noting with this Adidas smart soccer ball is that you cannot use the sensor features for kicks once the ball is in motion. Users report you cannot use it for tracking stats associated with, for example, a drop kick. The ball must be sitting still on the ground before being kicked if you wish to track the statistics.

It depends on its intended use. Soccer ball casings are made from three kinds of synthetic materials. Polyvinyl carbonate (PVC) which is what most less expensive training balls are made from, Polyurethane (PU) which is the preferred ball for soccer tournaments, and a combination of the two. There are also foam and rubber training soccer balls for kids. Some kids' soccer balls are made of 100 percent thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU), which is a kind of foamy casing material so the ball is very soft. There are greater and lesser grades of each kind of material. PU-covered balls are generally softer, livelier, and have a better feel to them, and are what most people seek when looking for a optimal performing soccer ball.
This is a decision being made by a league operator or manager of some sort, this section is important for you.  For the individual, there isn’t much of a determination here.  If you want something really nice like the pros, go premium.  But if not, then you probably will just want to go with a training ball.  But for people equipping their teams with materials, this is a decision that needs to be taken seriously.  I would suggest that recreational leagues stick with training match balls, even for matches.  The number of kicks that the ball will get and the improper technique will cause headaches for you if you decide to buy premium balls.  For high schools, I suggest just regular match balls as many are still learning the basics of the game and many teams simply play “kickball” at that age.  For college teams, semi-pros, serious travel clubs, and of course, professional teams, I suggest premium match balls for play!
Training balls are ideal for training and recreational use. These are the least expensive and more durable compared to professional match balls as they are meant to be continuously used for an extended period of time. This type of ball is usually constructed with 4 or fewer layers. The casing is made of PVC which makes its quality lower compared to a professional match soccer ball. Usually, the panels of a practice ball are molded together and not stitched together. These type of balls can withstand rough surfaces such as; asphalt and concrete.
This is the perfect ball for young children to practice drills before any competitive soccer game. Besides, if you love anything “USA,” you’ll surely want to buy this colorful and shiny ball by Vizari. It has a pocket-friendly price tag, and you’ll truly feel your money’s worth when you buy it. It comes deflated and sells in three different sizes. The ball is pretty durable and can be used on most surfaces to practice drills.
Whereas plenty of manufacturers that we reviewed opted to go with a soccer ball that was more durable than responsive, Mikasa takes the opposite approach and focuses primarily on the touch that their ball can provide. This is most apparent in the soccer ball’s choice of casing material. The synthetic leather casing of the Mikasa is by far the softest and naturally responsive-without the inclusion of texture-out of any other soccer ball we reviewed.
When it is about quality, these are almost same as premium match soccer balls but obviously not the same. To be exact, you can say official match soccer balls are positioning between premium match balls and training soccer balls regarding quality. That means these balls also offer an excellent level of air retention, shape, water absorption, curve, and performance. Although usually, they are not as durable as training balls but as a whole, they are very much durable.
This is what the majority of quality soccer balls are made out of. It offers a great blend of durability and responsiveness and is the material most commonly used by professional leagues for their game balls. In fact, FIFA uses polyurethane, or PU, exclusively for their game balls. One thing that allows PU to stand out above many of the other materials is its versatility.

Soccer balls have several panels that influence their flight characteristics and the amount of control a player can have while playing. International soccer competitions use a 32-panel ball. Major leagues use an 18-panel ball and indoor leagues use a 6-panel ball. High-end soccer balls have hand-stitched panels with a synthetic thread. A low-cost one for practice and training will usually have its panels glued together.
Latex bladders are one of the best materials when it comes to ball construction. However, with latex bladders, air won’t last as long as butyl bladders and will need more attention for proper inflation. Butyl-blend bladders hold in the air much better, but they are harder and less receptive in play. Mid-priced balls will usually have a mix of butyl and rubber. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c1SVcjYY6TE
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