This time there is no stitching to attach the panels, but they are thermally bonded. This is the interesting part. First, we wanted to see how it performs in the air for a free kick. You will find a decent, predictable trajectory. Although when you are knuckling, the result mainly depends on your skill and the air direction, a ball plays a vital role as well to help your process of a successful knuckle shot.
This ball has a TPU cover that we wouldn’t describe as “highly durable” for rough play. Although it handles indoor turf, it won’t handle concrete, gravel, or court-based play like you have with futsal. This ball prefers to have a natural or artificial grass surface and that is about it. If you happen to impact a tree, run the ball on concrete, or have it bounce on a gravel driveway, the outer cover does tend to get scratched up pretty rapidly. The butyl bladder is of a higher quality than other balls at this price point, allowing the ball to hold its inflation pressure with an impressive amount of consistency.
Some additional information worth noting with this Adidas smart soccer ball is that you cannot use the sensor features for kicks once the ball is in motion. Users report you cannot use it for tracking stats associated with, for example, a drop kick. The ball must be sitting still on the ground before being kicked if you wish to track the statistics.
This is a FIFA tested and approved ball so you can trust its quality and performance. For starters, it has 20 panels which facilitate control of the ball. Additionally, the casing uses polyurethane material which is one of the strongest soccer ball casings available. Unlike other professional soccer balls, this one uses Puma’s latest stress-free dimple technology. Just like any other high-quality ball, it will require frequent inflation compared to ordinary practice balls. This ball features the Puma Airlock Valve Technology (PAL) which facilitates proper airlock technology.

Of everything that we have analyzed about these soccer balls, one of the biggest things that you can look at for is the external material of the ball. TPU seems like it is the standard in durability for soccer balls in this price range. Machine stitching is another thing that you want to make sure that you have, as it appears that some balls that are stitched otherwise can split open and leak. In any case, make sure that you have your own soccer pump so that you can always be sure that your soccer ball is properly inflated.
All in all a street soccer ball needs to be rough and tough with all the attributes we discussed so far. Senda street soccer ball has fulfilled all these requirements, and met our expectation. We recommend you to buy this option if you want to play on street or hard surface. We found this as a good quality model with the proper construction as we discussed. The weight and bounce are also according to the requirement of a street soccer ball.
Wilson is a classic sports company that gives you just about everything that you need in a soccer ball. This ball has a synthetic leather cover which is soft to the kick, but also has enhanced ball durability. It has a butyl rubber bladder to hold the air which gives the ball its shape and and retains the air. This has the classic black and white panel colors.
Rounding out our list is just a good old, cool-looking training ball from the people over at Puma.  This ball comes will three distinct colors on it.  Black is in the middle of pink and yellow, so this would be an absolute dream for the soccer-loving girl in your life!  It is machine stitched for durability and a very soft feel.  It holds up for extended periods of time and does so starting at a very low price, so take a look for yourself!
During the 1900s, footballs were made out of rubber and leather which was perfect for bouncing and kicking the ball; however, when heading the football (hitting it with the player's head) it was usually painful. This problem was most probably due to water absorption of the leather from rain, which caused a considerable increase in weight, causing head or neck injury. By around 2017, this had also been associated with dementia in former players.[8][9] Another problem of early footballs was that they deteriorated quickly, as the leather used in manufacturing the footballs varied in thickness and in quality.[6]
Furthermore, cleaning the ball is a very important task that you must do on a regular basis. It could help you avoid water absorption issues, and it will help make it last longer. Clean a soccer ball with some mild soap and lukewarm water to maintain its performance. Don’t use harsh cleaning agents as this might damage the ball’s construction material. Storing the ball in low temperatures is ideal to avoid warping or water retention. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_TX8dExPIWc
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