This type of ball is easy to distinguish because its outer material is similar to the material used on tennis balls. They normally are a size 5 and similar to the outdoor soccer ball. Indoor soccer balls are purposely designed with less rebound in order to accommodate turf and harder surfaces that cover the walls of an indoor soccer field and playing ground.
You have to wonder if a brand recognized mostly for baseball can make a good soccer ball, but this one seems like a worthy effort. It certainly has the look and feel of a high end ball, and the overall build seems pretty solid. It looks like they put some effort designing this product. My son and his team practiced with this several times and I would say the wear and tear look normal. No tearing at the seams or unusual gashes. He says the padding gives the ball a nice, soft touch even when fully inflated. One bonus is, with such an uncommon soccer brand, it easier to identify if it gets lost on field. The reason for the lack of 5 stars is that our sample has trouble holding air after a couple of days. I do not know if it is a characteristic of the ball or
The second edition of the new dual bonded production method is the Target DB. This new ball is both machine-stiched and sealed with glue. The contstruction consists of a PU-material laminated with 3.5 mm foam. Two layers of textile underlining are them laminated to the foam layers to add stability. Finally, the panels are 3D printed with a 3mm edge glue and stitched together. The glue is activated in the heat mold to hide the stitches and the seam sealing is done by hand. By using glue in the sealing of the seams, the water uptake is reduced significantly.The bladder inside is a SR-bladder with excellent air retention. The result is a soccer ball with both stability, control and a softer touch compared to other balls in the range.
Adidas spared little expense with this soccer ball and made sure that the materials used could pass almost any standard for grass fields. First, the casing is made of polyurethane, providing a great balance between responsiveness and durability-though they further increased the responsiveness with 3D textures. The bladder is made out of butyl, so you will not have to worry about constantly reinflating it, while the ball is lined with soft and water-resistant polyester.
A football, soccer ball, or association football ball is the ball used in the sport of association football. The name of the ball varies according to whether the sport is called "football", "soccer", or "association football". The ball's spherical shape, as well as its size, weight, and material composition, are specified by Law 2 of the Laws of the Game maintained by the International Football Association Board. Additional, more stringent, standards are specified by FIFA and subordinate governing bodies for the balls used in the competitions they sanction.
The best soccer ball for your child will depend on league requirements, since different age groups and leagues require different kinds of soccer balls. There are lots of great soccer balls for kids. Talk to their coach. Soccer balls for kids don't have to be expensive. Once you know your child's correct size, select one they like. If it feels right to them and they fall in love with it, they'll spend hours kicking it around and boning up on their skills. Make sure their soccer ball is lightweight and easy for them to control. For any kid new to soccer, that first goal will be a real self-confidence booster! Remember to keep training fun. We offer many colorful, affordable, fun-print soccer balls to liven up their practices.
Differing from competing balls that utilize plastic, the deluxe cushioned cover of the Mikasa Serious Soccer Ball is made of synthetic leather. This soft, durable material is exponentially easier on the shins and foreheads of players used to batting the ball around regularly. The leather is forgiving in its impact, allowing passes and shooting to be crisper off of the athlete’s foot.

Our family has tried out a lot of value-priced soccer balls over the years. For example, this one was purchased as one of many, including some more expensive models by various manufacturers. But, funny enough, this is the one we always pick when it's time to play. It feels nice and plays nice. Maybe the balls are softer if you spend considerably more, but even at 2-3 times the cost of this ball, we like this one better. So, if you're looking for a soccer ball and you don't want to break the bank, stop searching, just get this one and know you got the right one.
Of course, no one should truly expect this ball to be made for an organized league game since its primary selling point is that it glows in the dark. This soccer ball features two red LED lights that are powered by the same kinds of batteries used for watches. Even better, the batteries themselves are easy to change out and even have a specialized tool to assist in doing so. To prevent the batteries from running out too quickly, the ball is kick-activated and stays lit for 40 seconds.
In terms of durability, you can’t really go past Select. The polyurethane cover on the Numero 10 is tough enough to withstand dog bites and general wear and tear, but still feels nice and soft when kicked. Although this ball is a bit more expensive than other replicas, it comes with a two year warranty for peace of mind when buying. It also retains its bounce very well over the years – perfect for practising volleys and clearances.
What are the different types of soccer balls? Should I buy an expensive one, a middle priced one or a cheap one? What kind of balls are adequate for my needs?  Most soccer balls can be divided into three different categories, professional match balls, match balls, and practice balls.  The type you need of course depends on how and where you want to use the soccer ball. For more information on types of soccer balls, click here. 
It depends on its intended use. Soccer ball casings are made from three kinds of synthetic materials. Polyvinyl carbonate (PVC) which is what most less expensive training balls are made from, Polyurethane (PU) which is the preferred ball for soccer tournaments, and a combination of the two. There are also foam and rubber training soccer balls for kids. Some kids' soccer balls are made of 100 percent thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU), which is a kind of foamy casing material so the ball is very soft. There are greater and lesser grades of each kind of material. PU-covered balls are generally softer, livelier, and have a better feel to them, and are what most people seek when looking for a optimal performing soccer ball.
Footballs have gone through a dramatic change over time. During medieval times balls were normally made from an outer shell of leather filled with cork shavings.[4] Another method of creating a ball was using animal bladders for the inside of the ball making it inflatable. However, these two styles of creating footballs made it easy for the ball to puncture and were inadequate for kicking. It was not until the 19th century that footballs developed into what a football looks like today.
I’ve been a fan of soccer since I was 12, and choosing the right ball has always been an issue for me for many reasons ( size of the ball, its cover get torn easily, the ball don’t last long). this article had shed the light on everything you should take into consideration when buying a soccer ball, it was a very informative and well explained article it made me feel engrossed while reading it, so thanks for sharing. The Knuckle-it Pro soccer ball caught my attention, the features of this ball suits my needs as I love freekicks and I don’t really care about the brands. I’ll keep this ball in my mind for sure, when i consider buying a new ball.
The soccer ball has gone through various changes just as the football game. As opposed to yesterday’s football ball that had stitches and seams and the classic black and white design, today’s soccer balls are designed with the latest technology that lets the ball bend more, fly quicker and also dip harder. Besides, they are quite soft that they let players kick the ball further without risking injuries.
In the year 1863, the first specifications for footballs were laid down by the Football Association. Previous to this, footballs were made out of inflated leather, with later leather coverings to help footballs maintain their shapes.[3] In 1872 the specifications were revised, and these rules have been left essentially unchanged as defined by the International Football Association Board. Differences in footballs created since this rule came into effect have been to do with the material used in their creation.
Law 1: The Field of Play Law 2: The Ball Law 3: The Number of Players Law 4: The Players' Equipment Law 5: The Referee Law 6: The Other Match Officials Law 7: The Duration of the Match Law 8: The Start and Restart of Play Law 9: The Ball In and Out of Play Law 10: The Method of Scoring Law 11: Offside Law 12: Fouls and Misconduct Law 13: Free kicks (direct and indirect) Law 14: The Penalty Kick Law 15: The Throw-In Law 16: The Goal Kick Law 17: The Corner Kick
Everything an inexpensive, real soccer ball should be. This Wilson was significantly better-constructed, heavier and more durable than I expected it to be. Every purchase, quality-wise, must be weighed against price. And for less than $10, this sucker will last you a LONG time. I bought it for my 2-year-old. This will be the size ball he uses until he's 8 or so. Assuming he wants to play soccer. Oh dear lord, please have him want to play soccer. Come on. I need this!
This Bend-It soccer ball is designed with training in mind. It’s a regulation size 5 soccer ball which means you’ll train with the same weight and feel as the professionals! It offers a seamless, thermo-bonded surface that’s 100% Polyurethane. You can train with this ball for a long time without worrying about it wearing out prematurely. This design also means no matter how hard you play, your ball will maintain its perfectly round shape. So, when you train you are training with the same feel each time and are bound to perfect your moves!
Sizing is very important in selecting a soccer ball.  For the purposes of this article, I will mostly concentrate on size 5 outdoor soccer balls, but I will quickly go over the various sizes and let you know what they are used for.  Size 1 soccer balls, or skill balls (also known as mini balls), are primarily used by youth players that are just being introduced to the game.  These are typically 1-3-year-olds.  Another use for Size 1 balls is for older players to learn to juggle.  It is much harder to juggle a size 1, so instead of using a hacky sack, they use a skill ball.  This is done because the texture and materials are similar.  Size 3 balls are slightly bigger than size 1 and are used for ages four through seven.  They do this so that the ball isn’t too big in comparison to the players.  Size 4 balls are used for age eight through eleven.  Size 4s are smaller than size 5, which is used for everyone past the age of eleven.  This is the same size that the professionals use.  Making sure that you have the proper ball is just as important as picking out which materials one has.
Above I have told you some information about professional soccer ball. I have told you who can use them, I have also listed a couple of great examples of this great soccer balls and after that I have also told you what you should look and how to take care about them. Now it’s time for your move. Take a look and order a couple of these awesome soccer balls.
This match ball is an updated version of the popular Nike Ordem Professional soccer ball. Its goal is to withstand high-level play. A fuse-welded synthetic leather casing is optimal for touch and response. It also has a restricted six-wing carbon latex bladder for maximum air retention and explosiveness. The wrapped bladder also gives it a perfectly round shape, touch, and bounce. High contrast graphic design creates better visibility for this match soccer ball. Overall, this official match soccer ball boasts of 40% synthetic leather, 30% rubber, 20% polyester, and 10% cotton.
As a response to the problems with the balls in the 1962 FIFA World Cup, Adidas created the Adidas Santiago[17] – this led to Adidas winning the contract to supply the match balls for all official FIFA and UEFA matches, which they have held since the 1970s, and also for the Olympic Games.[18] They also supply the ball for the UEFA Champions League which is called the Adidas Finale.
A tribute to one of the richest teams in the world, Paris St. Germain, this ball is dressed in their colors.  This is a ball meant for everyday use, so you can get out there and show off your favorite club to everyone.  It is made from polyurethane and has some polyester inside of it, making it slightly different than the Messi ball.  The polyester buttresses the butyl bladder, causing it to retain air and shape.  It is machine stitched and has 26 panels, so it may take a little bit of getting used to the first time.  Like the Messi ball, it comes at a pretty steep price, so it may be a little pricey if you aren’t a PSG fan!
Latex bladders are used in high-quality balls. These kind of bladders are soft and provide good feeling. They offer better response and bounce than Butyl bladders, but the downside of this kind of bladder is they don’t hold the air for too long. As a result, they require filling more frequently. Air escapes due to micropores on the cover, but nowadays some balls are constructed with carbon latex bladder to help to close these micropores. As a result, the balls can hold air for a longer period.
During the game, there were two different balls used: the 12 panel Argentine players model like this one and a T-shaped model used by Uruguay. There’s speculation the use of the two different balls actually played a part in the outcome of the game. Argentina started using this 12-panel ball and entered the halftime with a 2-1 lead. However, the T-shaped model used in the second half worked towards Uruguay’s advantage as they won 4-2 by the end of the match.
The second edition of the new dual bonded production method is the Target DB. This new ball is both machine-stiched and sealed with glue. The contstruction consists of a PU-material laminated with 3.5 mm foam. Two layers of textile underlining are them laminated to the foam layers to add stability. Finally, the panels are 3D printed with a 3mm edge glue and stitched together. The glue is activated in the heat mold to hide the stitches and the seam sealing is done by hand. By using glue in the sealing of the seams, the water uptake is reduced significantly.The bladder inside is a SR-bladder with excellent air retention. The result is a soccer ball with both stability, control and a softer touch compared to other balls in the range.

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