Adidas spared little expense with this soccer ball and made sure that the materials used could pass almost any standard for grass fields. First, the casing is made of polyurethane, providing a great balance between responsiveness and durability-though they further increased the responsiveness with 3D textures. The bladder is made out of butyl, so you will not have to worry about constantly reinflating it, while the ball is lined with soft and water-resistant polyester.
Over time, many soccer balls tend to go out-of-round, especially if they are well-used. The Glider is designed to maintain its shape without losing air thanks to the firmness and consistency of the butyl bladder. Under regular use, we found that the air pressure was consistent enough that we didn’t need to add more air to the ball. If you play in organized soccer, then having consistency from the practice ball to the game ball is very important for skill development. The machine-stitched panels offer that experience for most players, even though the ball has the standard panel design.
Considering the positives previously mentioned, you might be wondering why we think this ball is only suited for practice-even if it is one of the best training soccer balls we have seen. This is because the Nike is not that responsive-at least, not compared to match soccer balls. This is largely because this ball uses a rubber bladder. This bladder is not responsive at all. On top of that, the foam lining and TPU casing are not the most responsive either-even if the latter does have texture to help increase its responsiveness.

Update (2 years post-purchase): Still love this ball and it's in its fifth season of use! I've just ordered another for our team since the fall season makes for darker and darker practices on our unlighted scrimmage field and we've come to rely on this ball so much. My teenagers use this ball at home all the time, including playing "soccer tennis" on hard surfaces and for banging against a brick wall (all of the print is long gone from the outer surface). We even took it to the beach this year. It never fails to get a reaction from people who see it bouncing around in the dark. I did have to replace one of the two lights, but they're available from GlowCity and are very reasonably priced (I purchased a couple of extra lights, just in case). I also bought a pack of 100

This soccer ball is specifically designed for indoor play. It features a foam backed casing that makes it just right for the indoor play. This fabric also facilitates skills developments for young players. It is the perfect ball for training and recreational play. This is a safe indoor soccer ball for young kids as the outer fabric provides a soft padding upon impact. Instead of air, this ball is foam filled which makes it a durable choice. This also means that the ball requires less maintenance since no air re-fill is required. The foam interior makes this ball safe, especially for its intended target users. The impact is cushioned hence young players can use it to practice for dribbles and head-batts. The fact that there are no chances of injury with this ball adds to its appeal.
A ball is just a ball, right? Well, it’s not quite that simple any more. Some important things to consider are what the ball is constructed of, what material is used for the lining or bladder and, to state the obvious, the size of ball you require, which will depend on the ages of the players and the ball’s intended use, be it for training or match games.
Outside of PU and TPU, pretty much every other material used for a soccer ball’s casing will be specialized for either durability or responsiveness. When it comes to synthetic leather, the focus is also exclusively on responsiveness and this is by far the most responsive material used for a soccer ball’s casing. It is important to note that PU, TPU, and PVC are all often labeled as synthetic leather.
This was one of the few soccer balls that came our way that didn’t come inflated out of the box. How well the ball is inflated will depend on the long-term viability of the butyl bladder in this ball. When properly inflated with the correct needle, the air can be held for weeks, or even months, at a time. Compared to latex bladders, which need to be inflated about once per week on average, this Nike soccer ball offers a minimal maintenance experience. As a practice and play ball, the Nike Pitch Premier League Soccer Ball offers players a number of options that can help them improve their skills.
On the other hand, replicas (sometimes called training balls or gliders) are designed to be just like the official match balls but are much cheaper. Their panels are often stitched rather than thermally-bonded and are made of a different material. However, they’re not necessarily less durable than official match balls. So, they’re the recommended option for most players.
Much like the Adidas ball we saw earlier, this offering from Adidas is top-of-the-line.  This a premium match ball that also has received the highest rating from FIFA.  To get that rating, it passed tests on its weight, how it retains air, the shape, and how well it keeps water out.  It also has seamless panels like the Hi-Vis Champions League ball.  Although not a cheap ball, this is worth a look if you are interested I premium match balls.
The cheaper balls only have two polyester layers on their lining. Soccer ball bladders can be made from two different kinds of materials. They can either be latex or butyl. A soccer ball bladder is a component of a soccer ball and it is tasked in containing the air that is within the ball. It also contributes to its shape and the ball’s receptiveness on the field.

Though, a ball designed to be played virtually anywhere will have to sacrifice something to achieve that versatility. For the Brasilia, that sacrifice comes in the form of responsiveness. While the glossy finish may offer some protection, it also reduces your touch with the ball. A bladder made out of synthetic rubber-not to mention that TPU is only okay when it comes to touch in the first place, further compounds this effect.
Why do I always have to pump up even expensive balls? Many balls use bladders made out of latex. Natural Latex Rubber bladders offer the softest feel and response, but do not provide the best air retention. Micro pores slowly let air escape. Balls with natural rubber bladders need to be re-inflated more often than balls with butyl bladders. Even after one or two days, the latex bladder will leak enough air so that you will have to inflate the ball back to recommended pressure. Some balls use carbon-latex bladders in which the carbon powder helps to close the micro pores. Soccer balls with carbon latex bladders usually increase air retention to approximately one week. Of course, check the ball for punctures that may cause the air to leak out.
Much like the Adidas ball we saw earlier, this offering from Adidas is top-of-the-line.  This a premium match ball that also has received the highest rating from FIFA.  To get that rating, it passed tests on its weight, how it retains air, the shape, and how well it keeps water out.  It also has seamless panels like the Hi-Vis Champions League ball.  Although not a cheap ball, this is worth a look if you are interested I premium match balls.
The outer casing of a soccer ball is composed of panels made from synthetic materials, such as PVC, PU, or a combination, sewn or glued together. Soccer ball casings are rarely leather anymore, since leather tends to absorb moisture making the ball heavier and not perform as well. The number of panels or sections of the outer casing varies according to design. Most professional soccer balls are the 32-panel design. More panels mean a rounder and stabler ball, and a more accurate flight.

Soccer balls have several panels that influence their flight characteristics and the amount of control a player can have while playing. International soccer competitions use a 32-panel ball. Major leagues use an 18-panel ball and indoor leagues use a 6-panel ball. High-end soccer balls have hand-stitched panels with a synthetic thread. A low-cost one for practice and training will usually have its panels glued together.
I purchased the soccer ball for my son as a gift. It came deflated so we filled it with air before boxing it. Upon opening it, it was deflated. It only held air for a few hours. I contacted the company and they immediately shipped out a new one without hassle that is holding air just fine. (I was very pleased with how prompt and pleasant they were!) It lights up very bright when hit or bounced and turns off on its own after a little while of not being hit or bounced. My kids all love it and play with it nightly. It is not stitched as a real soccer ball is, but is more of a heat fused soft plastic. It holds up just fine though to my 13 year old soccer player's kicks. We are all enjoying playing with it and happy with our purchase.

Another thing how I picked best soccer balls under $100 was recommendations by other who have already bought it. I searched on the web and also asked some of my teammates that are also a lot in to it. I than merged all opinions and made a list of top 5 soccer balls under 100$ which you can find above in the table! If you really have a low budget look at cheap soccer balls.
Huge fan of Bend-It, I would not consider buying any other brand of ball. I have 4 or 5 different styles that have been used and abused during club training and off-season indoor games. It's fun watching another coach pick it out of a crowd of balls to check the brand. I've even had a pro player pick this ball out of a crowd to use in group training sessions (Go STL FC!!)

MacGregor’s football ball has an official size of 4. It is the best rubber soccer ball to buy for a low price. It is a great starter ball for your little one and comes from high-quality materials that make it durable. Its Extended-life molded construction makes it the best playground soccer ball for kids. Besides, many customers recommend the MacGregor Rubber Soccer Ball because aside from being quite durable, it is pretty economical and worth the money you put on it.


Soccer — or football as it's known around the world — is arguably the most loved sport on Earth. Although Americans still aren't as enamored of the sport as the rest of the world is, teams around the country are stealing hearts and minds, and Americans are getting into the game. For years, soccer has been a sport played by kids, college students, and ex-pats, but it's now being cheered in stadiums and watched on national TV.
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