Today's footballs are more complex than past footballs. Most modern footballs consist of twelve regular pentagonal and twenty regular hexagonal panels positioned in a truncated icosahedron spherical geometry.[4] Some premium-grade 32-panel balls use non-regular polygons to give a closer approximation to sphericality.[12] The inside of the football is made up of a latex bladder which enables the football to be pressurised. The ball's panel pairs are stitched along the edge; this procedure can either be performed manually or with a machine.[5] The size of a football is roughly 22 cm (8.65 inches) in diameter for a regulation size 5 ball. Rules state that a size 5 ball must be 68 to 70 cm in circumference. Averaging that to 69 cm and then dividing by π gives about 22 cm for a diameter.
In 1838, Charles Goodyear introduced vulcanized rubber, which dramatically improved the football.[5] Vulcanisation is the treatment of rubber to give it certain qualities such as strength, elasticity, and resistance to solvents. Vulcanisation of rubber also helps the football resist moderate heat and cold. Vulcanisation helped create inflatable bladders that pressurize the outer panel arrangement of the football. Charles Goodyear's innovation increased the bounce ability of the ball and made it easier to kick. Most balls of this time had tanned leather with eighteen sections stitched together. These were arranged in six panels of three strips each.[6][7]
This type of ball is easy to distinguish because its outer material is similar to the material used on tennis balls. They normally are a size 5 and similar to the outdoor soccer ball. Indoor soccer balls are purposely designed with less rebound in order to accommodate turf and harder surfaces that cover the walls of an indoor soccer field and playing ground.
Ok. I was skeptical about this ball...surprisingly it is bright. It seems smaller than a normal soccer ball so I measured it. Yep, 27” as stated. I wonder how long the batteries will last. I’ll update this review after the 1st pair die. feels durable. Lights upon kicking. Takes two sets of batteries to light entire ball so make sure you keep lots of replacements on hand otherwise you’ll end up with 1/2 the ball lit.
This soccer ball is virtually indestructible. The manufacturers have designed it to withstand any challenge yet still keep afloat. It can be run over by a truck yet it will still maintain its balance. Set it ablaze and it will still hold its ground. Instead of air, this ball uses a unique foam known as ethylene-vinyl acetate foam. With this, the ball will never need a pump and will never go flat even when punctured. This special foam reinflates the ball when the need arises. This is a durable ball and you can use it on all types of playgrounds: concrete, grass, sand or any other surface.
This time there is no stitching to attach the panels, but they are thermally bonded. This is the interesting part. First, we wanted to see how it performs in the air for a free kick. You will find a decent, predictable trajectory. Although when you are knuckling, the result mainly depends on your skill and the air direction, a ball plays a vital role as well to help your process of a successful knuckle shot.

When it comes to soccer ball bladders, you will generally opt for the material that provides the most responsive touch for the highest levels of play. This is because it is a simple matter to re-inflate a soccer ball not to mention the fact that most competitive leagues will have numerous balls on hand. If touch and responsiveness are your key bladder attribute, there is no other material better than latex.
Like many soccer balls that we reviewed, whenever a manufacturer makes it a point to offer an incredibly durable soccer ball, they ultimately make a soccer ball that is not very responsive. This is the case with the Wilson as well and is primarily a result of the materials chose. The PVC casing and nylon lining might be incredibly durable, but they do not offer much give. Aside from reducing the ball’s responsiveness, this also makes the Wilson a bit more painful to kick for long periods.
1. The 2018 FIFA World Cup in Russia stole the attention of soccer fans around the globe this summer and the tournaments official ball, the adidas Telstar 18 World Cup Official Match Soccer Ball, ran away with the title ‘Best Selling Soccer Ball of 2018.’ (We don’t see any ball catching it over the next months). The ball was inspired by the famous Telstar ball that debuted at the 1970 FIFA World Cup in Mexico and released in November 2017. The design drew some criticism from fans but once on the field it lived up to its namesake in looks and performance.
For the most part, the materials used with the GlowCity soccer ball are generally considered the worst materials by competitive players. Both the casing and the bladder are made of rubber. The only bright spot in terms of materials is the lining, which is made of wound nylon. While these materials are generally less desirable than many others are, they do have the advantage of making the GlowCity soccer ball one of the most durable that we reviewed.
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The fact that this ball was not only tested but used in 2016 Euro qualification matches makes it a trusted choice. Its graphics are minimal with the majority of the surface being white in color. A hint of red and silver streaks breaks the monotony of the white yet maintains a simplistic appeal which appeals to the simplistic users. The graphic designs go against the panels which gives it a unique appeal. Its casing uses 100% PU leather and the panels are thermal-bonded which makes the surface smooth. Its bladder uses butyl material which improves air retention. The surface of the ball provides lower water absorption which contributes to its durability and gives it a better feel.

This is a very special soccer ball which I’ll think you’ll fall in love with. At least that was the case with me. I must say that I don’t normally trust new comers in the industry of soccer equipment. I mostly prefer established companies like Adidas, Select or Brine. However, the guys at Bend-it (the company behind Kunckle-it) really changed my perspective.
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