Keep your skills sharp and work on your craft with signature soccer balls from Nike. Engineered with a 12-panel design for true, accurate ball flight and control, Nike soccer balls come in a variety of color combinations and include a two-year stitch and shape guarantee. Whether you're a young athlete just learning the game or a seasoned veteran looking to refine your skills, Nike has soccer balls to help you get to that next level. All soccer balls come in a range of sizes depending on your age level. Buy Size 5 for ages 12 and up, Size 4 for ages 8-12, and Size 3 for ages 8 and under. Combine soccer balls with signature Nike soccer shoes, and put in the time to master your touch. Shop Nike soccer balls for men, women and kids, and be sure to explore the complete collection of Nike soccer accessories for additional gear, including soccer pants and shirts.
Of everything that we have analyzed about these soccer balls, one of the biggest things that you can look at for is the external material of the ball. TPU seems like it is the standard in durability for soccer balls in this price range. Machine stitching is another thing that you want to make sure that you have, as it appears that some balls that are stitched otherwise can split open and leak. In any case, make sure that you have your own soccer pump so that you can always be sure that your soccer ball is properly inflated.
Still, when it comes to soccer ball, which should work well for most people, we recommend the adidas Adidas WORLD CUP Official Match Ball. Every aspect of this ball is designed for professional play including the stitching that actually uses the superior thermal bonding for a truer flight. Even better, this ball as an NFC chip to provide feedback on your play.
Voit goes a way back since its foundation in 1922 in providing the best soccer balls to all soccer fans and professional players. By the end of the 1920, the company introduced the first fully molded rubber soccer ball. They also came with the needle like air retention valves. They later invented a technology that allowed the balls to be machine wound with sturdy nylon threads over the rubber bladder. This ensured that the soccer balls would be stronger and more consistent. It also made balls cheaper and more available since they can be produced in mass production.
If you've ever noticed, a traditional soccer ball resembles a geodesic dome building. Such as the one designed by architect, Richard Buckminster Fuller. Thus the ball became called the Buckminster Ball. Or more simply, the "Buckeyball". The design is characterized by a pattern of twenty hexagon pieces, and twelve pentagon pieces, fitted together to create a perfect sphere. The soccer ball has undergone many design changes of various-shaped panels stitched together. But until the geodesic dome-like ball, it was never quite round enough to perform right. Manufacturers settled upon the modern thirty-two panel design, which enables the ball to roll and spin more evenly and smoothly. Which is probably why it's the most popular competition soccer ball on the market today. The Buckminister-style soccer ball was first sold in the 1950s, and debuted in the 1970 World Cup tournament.

A quick inspection of the construction of the ball might help you make a quick decision. The first thing that you should look at is the panel of the ball. A soccer ball that has panels sewn together is a better choice than the ones that are glued together. The panels of a premium ball are stitched by hand while those of a lower quality are machine stitched.
When a tournament is held (like the FIFA World Cup), the sponsor of the event will design a brand new ball. These are official match balls – they’re used by professionals during real matches. They are designed to the highest possible build quality, have textured surfaces to improve stability in flight, and feature thermally-bonded panels for durability.
Crafted by Adidas, the Telstar 18 is the official ball of the FIFA World Cup. Drawing inspiration from the company's first World Cup match ball, which debuted at the 1970 tournament in Mexico, the new ball reimagines the 12 black panels on an otherwise white design. Fun fact: the iconic original black and white ball was made that way to be more visible for black-and-white TV viewers, and it was dubbed the "star of television."
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