What size soccer ball should I buy? The first step in purchasing soccer balls is determining the proper size(s) to buy. Many soccer leagues have different size requirements, so be sure to check with your coach or organization to find out which size ball to buy. Soccer balls for match use come in three different sizes which range from size 3 to size 5. For more information on soccer ball sizes, click here.
Inflate soccer balls to the pressure of 6-8 PPI (pounds per square inch). A pressure gauge will tell you when the air is enough. Under or over-inflating a soccer ball will shorten its life in one way or another. When under-inflated, the ball will not be resistant to the impact of kicks. On the other hand, over inflation will stretch out the bladder and put pressure on the panel stitches.
The inner lining and the bladder are some of the key components of a soccer ball’s construction. These components are the factors that give control to the shape and the feel of a soccer ball. The usual match soccer ball has four layers of a blended polyester and cotton material in its lining, while mid-range ones have two cotton and polyester layers.

Above I have told you some information about professional soccer ball. I have told you who can use them, I have also listed a couple of great examples of this great soccer balls and after that I have also told you what you should look and how to take care about them. Now it’s time for your move. Take a look and order a couple of these awesome soccer balls.
By no means is this type of ball similar to a typical soccer ball. For starters, instead of air, its bladder is filled with foam. In this case, the ball has less bounce and is heavier in order to facilitate its purpose; meant to be used on a hard surface indoors. This size 4 ball may also have suede castings which help to stabilize the ball on a slippery floor.
We covered the quality in small detail above, but we’ll look into a little further here.  The quality of the ball you pick is very important.  If you want exactly what the pros play with, then you will have to pay a little more as a result of picking the premium choice. Those balls fly better and more true than their counterparts, but they are not meant to be practiced with on a regular basis.  Premium balls tend to have a softer impact on both your cleats and ankle guards to allow for more ball control and handling.  After the “premium” match ball category is the “match ball” category.  These aren’t nearly as expensive as the premiums are, but are still very good in match situations.  These aren’t meant for practice, but they typically can hold up for extended periods of time, possibly a season or two.  The third type is “training balls.”  These balls are meant for training and practice, and they can be used continuously without doing damage to it.  I have some great training balls that have lasted upwards of six years!  The quality of training balls has gone up drastically over the years that I have been playing.  When I was younger, some of them were so hard that you’d feel like your foot was broken after kicking them.  Nowadays, they literally feel like a premium ball with their softness and their flight.  So, almost any ball is great nowadays from the right supplier!
This is by far the best ball for younger soccer players. I've had this ball for just under a week now, and I'm already seeing improvement in my knuckles. This ball, similarly to official match balls, has thermally fused panels, and doesn't absorb water. It also glides nicely in the air. It has a GREAT texture, and is fun to practice footwork and freestyling with, in addition to shooting. I looked for weeks to find an affordable match ball, and when I found this, I was thrilled! I am sort of a soccer nerd, and I spend much of my free time looking at cleats, balls, and shooting techniques, so I sort of know what I'm talking about, and I highly recommend this ball to anyone looking to improve their shooting skills, or anyone who simply wants an affordable match ball to use.
There are several different materials and methods of construction used in soccer balls. Typically, Polyurethane casings are preferred as they’re often seamless and thermally bonded for premium play and long-lasting durability. However, many of the hand-stitched options are also very durable. The least durable options tend to be lower in price and machine stitched.
Hi Everyone! My name is Pete (yes, I’m a real person who lives in a cornfield just outside of Buffalo, NY – well, my house is in the middle of a cornfield!). As a former collegiate athlete in Iowa, I’ve played varsity basketball, volleyball and soccer. I also happen to be an outdoor adventure fanatic who’ll do whatever it takes to never miss my annual week-long wilderness canoe trip in the Northern Ontario wilderness. Sports equipment has come a long way over just the past few years, and I’d love to share with you the latest (and most competitively priced) products that will save you many of the frustrations I’ve dealt with over the years! Please feel free to cruise the site and drop me a line on the contact page if you have ideas for improvements or anything else!
At 1soccerstore.com we offer a wide selection of equipment including Nike and Adidas soccer balls for players of all skill. We offer the same soccer balls used by professionals throughout the world including the official FIFA World Cup soccer ball giving you the same experience as the players in the World Cup; as well as the official soccer ball used by the MLS, English Premier and other top-tier leagues. In addition to World Cup soccer balls we offer a variety of soccer balls featuring the world’s most talented teams including Manchester United, FC Barcelona, Real Madrid, Arsenal, Inter Milan and others so you can show your support throughout the year.
This is the 4th one we've ordered! This is a tough ball that glows very brightly at night and comes with an extra battery, but we haven't had to change batteries after 2 summers of playing with it. Whenever my kids brought it out during our outdoor, night-time, community concerts, all the kids wanted to play with it and tons of parents came up to get the information on where to get it. I had originally ordered it so that my son could still see the ball at the end of his fall soccer practices, since they play on a field without lights. Now it is the favorite birthday present to give to all of my kids' friends (ages 7 and 11).
If you have a youth player for whom you are purchasing this soccer ball, then take note that the Size 3 ball in this series is closer to a Size 4 ball. The weight and feel is still accurate, so it is good for home practice and play. The sizing just might make it difficult to take this ball to practice for some players. It doesn’t come with a 32-panel design, but it does have the traditional hexagon panels over the entire cover of the ball. This allows players to work on some ball movement skills, as well as placement drills, with relative ease at home.
Enough learning on different aspects of soccer balls? Let’s have some fun then. We are going to give you our other specific reviews on different types of soccer balls so that you can choose the right option for you applying the knowledge you have just gathered. Obviously we suggest you to buy from the ones that we reviewed above. But you can consider the following ones as well.
If you've ever noticed, a traditional soccer ball resembles a geodesic dome building. Such as the one designed by architect, Richard Buckminster Fuller. Thus the ball became called the Buckminster Ball. Or more simply, the "Buckeyball". The design is characterized by a pattern of twenty hexagon pieces, and twelve pentagon pieces, fitted together to create a perfect sphere. The soccer ball has undergone many design changes of various-shaped panels stitched together. But until the geodesic dome-like ball, it was never quite round enough to perform right. Manufacturers settled upon the modern thirty-two panel design, which enables the ball to roll and spin more evenly and smoothly. Which is probably why it's the most popular competition soccer ball on the market today. The Buckminister-style soccer ball was first sold in the 1950s, and debuted in the 1970 World Cup tournament.
The game of soccer has evolved greatly over the years and the ball has evolved with it.  In days past, defenses played with as many as six men back.  Then things changed around the 1950s to allow when many teams played four forwards at one time!  Now, we are in a period where we see (sometimes) one natural forward in a team.  The changes that have happened in the game have oftentimes been a result of the changes to the soccer ball itself.  Through its many changes, it has allowed teams to change strategies.

Soccer balls also have various sizes that you can choose from, and what is best for you will depend on how old you currently are. Soccer balls come in different constructions in the inner bladder and the lining, which can contribute to their responsiveness on the field. Panels on a soccer ball are also important since they can influence a ball’s flight characteristics, and the control a player will have on the field. Like any other sporting equipment, picking the right soccer ball, if you are very meticulous, is something that will need some key points to consider.
However, this has not stopped players from preferring butyl as their bladder material of choice. In fact, this preference is so well cemented by players of all skill sets, that manufacturers professional game balls are just as likely to use butyl bladders as they are latex often times even more likely. It is interesting to note that butyl is more durable than latex but less durable than rubber-despite providing had better air retention.
If you've ever noticed, a traditional soccer ball resembles a geodesic dome building. Such as the one designed by architect, Richard Buckminster Fuller. Thus the ball became called the Buckminster Ball. Or more simply, the "Buckeyball". The design is characterized by a pattern of twenty hexagon pieces, and twelve pentagon pieces, fitted together to create a perfect sphere. The soccer ball has undergone many design changes of various-shaped panels stitched together. But until the geodesic dome-like ball, it was never quite round enough to perform right. Manufacturers settled upon the modern thirty-two panel design, which enables the ball to roll and spin more evenly and smoothly. Which is probably why it's the most popular competition soccer ball on the market today. The Buckminister-style soccer ball was first sold in the 1950s, and debuted in the 1970 World Cup tournament.
Soccer balls also have various sizes that you can choose from, and what is best for you will depend on how old you currently are. Soccer balls come in different constructions in the inner bladder and the lining, which can contribute to their responsiveness on the field. Panels on a soccer ball are also important since they can influence a ball’s flight characteristics, and the control a player will have on the field. Like any other sporting equipment, picking the right soccer ball, if you are very meticulous, is something that will need some key points to consider.

The technology portions of this DribbleUp soccer ball are truly cool. This ball is designed to help you perfect your training and keep track of your progress over time. Amazingly, it doesn’t need to be charged in order to do this! It actually works with the DribbleUp application. The package comes with a smartphone stand and, once the application is downloaded, the application uses your phone camera to track movements and provide instant feedback. Unfortunately, I couldn’t find any information regarding how this will impact your phone’s battery life. But I would recommend having a full battery before game play or keeping a charger handy just in case.
Due to it being significantly softer than the other types of rubbers used for soccer ball bladders, latex is generally seen as the premier material. Though, this same perception may not hold as true for practice balls or even game balls at lower levels of competition. This is because latex bladders retain air worse than all of the other soccer ball bladder materials and will need to be re-inflated more often.
Early footballs began as animal bladders or stomachs that would easily fall apart if kicked too much. Improvements became possible in the 19th century with the introduction of rubber and discoveries of vulcanization by Charles Goodyear. The modern 32-panel ball design was developed in 1962 by Eigil Nielsen, and technological research continues today to develop footballs with improved performance. The 32-panel ball design was soon overcome by 24-panel balls as well as 42-panel balls, both of which improved performance compared to before, in 2007.[citation needed]
Whereas plenty of manufacturers that we reviewed opted to go with a soccer ball that was more durable than responsive, Mikasa takes the opposite approach and focuses primarily on the touch that their ball can provide. This is most apparent in the soccer ball’s choice of casing material. The synthetic leather casing of the Mikasa is by far the softest and naturally responsive-without the inclusion of texture-out of any other soccer ball we reviewed.
Now let’s talk a bit about what is it that they are made of and sizes and it’s importance. Soccer is the best way to learn physics as you learn to control a ball’s movement, all the while studying the force you need to exert to get to that optimal point. Specially for a professional player or someone who is on the path to it. They must know ins and out while they learn to control it.
However, this has not stopped players from preferring butyl as their bladder material of choice. In fact, this preference is so well cemented by players of all skill sets, that manufacturers professional game balls are just as likely to use butyl bladders as they are latex often times even more likely. It is interesting to note that butyl is more durable than latex but less durable than rubber-despite providing had better air retention.
The soccer ball has gone through various changes just as the football game. As opposed to yesterday’s football ball that had stitches and seams and the classic black and white design, today’s soccer balls are designed with the latest technology that lets the ball bend more, fly quicker and also dip harder. Besides, they are quite soft that they let players kick the ball further without risking injuries. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DGp37du0xbQ
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