If you’re looking for discounted soccer gear and equipment, you’ve come to the right place. soccerloco has it all and more at incredibly low prices in our soccer clearance shop. We carry a wide selection of shoes and apparel for men, women, and children at a highly reduced price, so you can cheer your favorite teams on or score goals in style and comfort without breaking the bank.
Tachikara ball is sold deflated at a reasonable price that is friendly to your pocket. The orange and white size-three ball is made of leather and machine-stitched making it very durable. It is the ideal ball for PE classes, for warm-ups, camps, and recreational play. This new soccer ball with butyl bladder is a great all around youth football ball.
Sizing is very important in selecting a soccer ball.  For the purposes of this article, I will mostly concentrate on size 5 outdoor soccer balls, but I will quickly go over the various sizes and let you know what they are used for.  Size 1 soccer balls, or skill balls (also known as mini balls), are primarily used by youth players that are just being introduced to the game.  These are typically 1-3-year-olds.  Another use for Size 1 balls is for older players to learn to juggle.  It is much harder to juggle a size 1, so instead of using a hacky sack, they use a skill ball.  This is done because the texture and materials are similar.  Size 3 balls are slightly bigger than size 1 and are used for ages four through seven.  They do this so that the ball isn’t too big in comparison to the players.  Size 4 balls are used for age eight through eleven.  Size 4s are smaller than size 5, which is used for everyone past the age of eleven.  This is the same size that the professionals use.  Making sure that you have the proper ball is just as important as picking out which materials one has.
In 1838, Charles Goodyear introduced vulcanized rubber, which dramatically improved the football.[5] Vulcanisation is the treatment of rubber to give it certain qualities such as strength, elasticity, and resistance to solvents. Vulcanisation of rubber also helps the football resist moderate heat and cold. Vulcanisation helped create inflatable bladders that pressurize the outer panel arrangement of the football. Charles Goodyear's innovation increased the bounce ability of the ball and made it easier to kick. Most balls of this time had tanned leather with eighteen sections stitched together. These were arranged in six panels of three strips each.[6][7]
This particular indoor ball has all the qualities that make it ideal for an indoor soccer ball. The exterior uses a soft felt material. The panels of this size 5 indoor ball are hand stitched which makes it more durable than machine stitched panels. Its bounce is not too high which sits well with the requirements of an indoor soccer ball. It is not too bouncy or light but it flies rather well when kicked. This gives the player ample control during a session. It has a comfortable texture that’s pleasant to hold, for a goalkeeper and comfortable for footwork especially if the player is barefooted. Has a bright color that makes it visible during a game. Players can easily keep track of it, especially in an indoor setting.
This is much like the kind of balls that I often buy and play with.  This is a training ball, but don’t let that fool you into thinking that means it is low quality. It is machine stitched, meaning it is mass-produced and has a nylon interior, making the ball last a long time as you practice and do your daily drills.  It also has a butyl bladder and is polyurethane so that it will stay inflated longer.  It has a really catchy green and black design and I’m sure all the kids would absolutely love to have this ball (or two) for the great price!
During the 1900s, footballs were made out of rubber and leather which was perfect for bouncing and kicking the ball; however, when heading the football (hitting it with the player's head) it was usually painful. This problem was most probably due to water absorption of the leather from rain, which caused a considerable increase in weight, causing head or neck injury. By around 2017, this had also been associated with dementia in former players.[8][9] Another problem of early footballs was that they deteriorated quickly, as the leather used in manufacturing the footballs varied in thickness and in quality.[6]

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What sets each soccer ball apart from another is the quality of the materials that are used in its construction. The lining, bladder, cover, and the quality of the overall craftsmanship will all influence the final cost of the soccer ball you’re looking at. Higher quality balls are usually bonded together to provide a superior shape retention experience and offer a truer flight.
Latex bladders are one of the best materials when it comes to ball construction. However, with latex bladders, air won’t last as long as butyl bladders and will need more attention for proper inflation. Butyl-blend bladders hold in the air much better, but they are harder and less receptive in play. Mid-priced balls will usually have a mix of butyl and rubber. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c1SVcjYY6TE
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