During the 1900s, footballs were made out of rubber and leather which was perfect for bouncing and kicking the ball; however, when heading the football (hitting it with the player's head) it was usually painful. This problem was most probably due to water absorption of the leather from rain, which caused a considerable increase in weight, causing head or neck injury. By around 2017, this had also been associated with dementia in former players.[8][9] Another problem of early footballs was that they deteriorated quickly, as the leather used in manufacturing the footballs varied in thickness and in quality.[6]

Of everything that we have analyzed about these soccer balls, one of the biggest things that you can look at for is the external material of the ball. TPU seems like it is the standard in durability for soccer balls in this price range. Machine stitching is another thing that you want to make sure that you have, as it appears that some balls that are stitched otherwise can split open and leak. In any case, make sure that you have your own soccer pump so that you can always be sure that your soccer ball is properly inflated.
During the 1900s, footballs were made out of rubber and leather which was perfect for bouncing and kicking the ball; however, when heading the football (hitting it with the player's head) it was usually painful. This problem was most probably due to water absorption of the leather from rain, which caused a considerable increase in weight, causing head or neck injury. By around 2017, this had also been associated with dementia in former players.[8][9] Another problem of early footballs was that they deteriorated quickly, as the leather used in manufacturing the footballs varied in thickness and in quality.[6]

During the 1900s, footballs were made out of rubber and leather which was perfect for bouncing and kicking the ball; however, when heading the football (hitting it with the player's head) it was usually painful. This problem was most probably due to water absorption of the leather from rain, which caused a considerable increase in weight, causing head or neck injury. By around 2017, this had also been associated with dementia in former players.[8][9] Another problem of early footballs was that they deteriorated quickly, as the leather used in manufacturing the footballs varied in thickness and in quality.[6]
The Futsal ball is typically smaller, harder, and heavier, allowing for less bounce and better control on harder surfaces. Senda Athletics is the official ball partner of U.S. Youth Futsal and the Vitoria is the Official Ball of the USYF League. Accented with bright red or green and created with fair trade practices, its stamp of "Respect," "Joy," and "Community" expresses the company's philosophy.
Adidas spared little expense with this soccer ball and made sure that the materials used could pass almost any standard for grass fields. First, the casing is made of polyurethane, providing a great balance between responsiveness and durability-though they further increased the responsiveness with 3D textures. The bladder is made out of butyl, so you will not have to worry about constantly reinflating it, while the ball is lined with soft and water-resistant polyester.
Built for durability, recreation balls are made of soft synthetic materials for play on nearly any field. Typically, these balls are slightly heavier for beginner’s slower play, yet, competitors of all skill levels use these balls for practice and recreation on hard turf fields due to their resilience. Machine-stitching is the most stand-out visual difference between match balls and training balls and it offers a consistent touch for any player.
What size soccer ball should I buy? The first step in purchasing soccer balls is determining the proper size(s) to buy. Many soccer leagues have different size requirements, so be sure to check with your coach or organization to find out which size ball to buy. Soccer balls for match use come in three different sizes which range from size 3 to size 5. For more information on soccer ball sizes, click here.
Soccer balls come in different variants and choosing one that is right will depend on how you prefer your ball and how you would like to use it. Soccer balls are built of different materials mostly made out of common rubber, polyurethane, nylon or polyvinyl chloride. While polyvinyl chloride balls can get really durable, they may not be as soft and touch responsive as polyurethane blend balls.
This soccer ball was purchased as a birthday gift for an 8 year old boy. He loves to play soccer and was thrilled to get this ball. However, as it comes deflated in a mostly plain white box - no pictures and no real description of what's inside, we inflated the ball and wrote a description ourselves. There was no printed info inside the box either, except for instructions in very tiny print on how to change the batteries. Nowhere were the size of the batteries identified! So, I was not happy with the packaging of this ball as a gift. However, the ball itself seemed to be of good quality and lit up easily when dropped or kicked and was a real "kid-pleaser". So overall, the product was good, but the packaging could be improved.
I bought this ball for a non-traditional use: my miniature donkey LOVES to roll and toss balls, and slightly deflated soccer balls seem to be easiest for him to grab. We've had this one for several months now, and it has withstood his rough play extremely well. In fact, I'm back to buy another so we have a backup in case our first gets lost. I definitely recommend!
A quick inspection of the construction of the ball might help you make a quick decision. The first thing that you should look at is the panel of the ball. A soccer ball that has panels sewn together is a better choice than the ones that are glued together. The panels of a premium ball are stitched by hand while those of a lower quality are machine stitched.
This ball has a TPU cover that we wouldn’t describe as “highly durable” for rough play. Although it handles indoor turf, it won’t handle concrete, gravel, or court-based play like you have with futsal. This ball prefers to have a natural or artificial grass surface and that is about it. If you happen to impact a tree, run the ball on concrete, or have it bounce on a gravel driveway, the outer cover does tend to get scratched up pretty rapidly. The butyl bladder is of a higher quality than other balls at this price point, allowing the ball to hold its inflation pressure with an impressive amount of consistency.

The soccer ball has gone through various changes just as the football game. As opposed to yesterday’s football ball that had stitches and seams and the classic black and white design, today’s soccer balls are designed with the latest technology that lets the ball bend more, fly quicker and also dip harder. Besides, they are quite soft that they let players kick the ball further without risking injuries. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DGp37du0xbQ
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