Update (2 years post-purchase): Still love this ball and it's in its fifth season of use! I've just ordered another for our team since the fall season makes for darker and darker practices on our unlighted scrimmage field and we've come to rely on this ball so much. My teenagers use this ball at home all the time, including playing "soccer tennis" on hard surfaces and for banging against a brick wall (all of the print is long gone from the outer surface). We even took it to the beach this year. It never fails to get a reaction from people who see it bouncing around in the dark. I did have to replace one of the two lights, but they're available from GlowCity and are very reasonably priced (I purchased a couple of extra lights, just in case). I also bought a pack of 100

 I’ll be honest right out of the gate in saying that I don’t have any experience with Senda.  But after looking at this ball, I will have to try one out soon!  Senda brings a very classic look to its ball, giving you a throwback to days gone by.  It has 32 panels and claims that it can be used outdoors, indoors, and on turf.  It is hand stitched with premium leather and has four layers of hybrid polyester and cotton linings between the cover and the bladder to help it last longer.  It is NHFS approved with its latex bladder, so it would be great for use in high school matches.  And especially considering it’s low cost.

The exclusive design of the exterior hides a football manufactured in specially-developed Japanese TEIJIN microfibre, which makes the ball seem significantly softer than its predecessor. Without compromising on material thickness or adding foam, we have achieved a thoroughly tested feeling of liveliness and lightness – while naturally also preserving the good characteristics such as control and stability that have always characterised a BRILLANT SUPER.The material may be Japanese but BRILLANT SUPER is produced as always by our year-long supplier in Pakistan. The ball is sewn by hand and produced in quality materials from its innermost to its outermost layers. The Zero-Wing bladder ensures that the ball remains in constant balance throughout its flight through the air and a Double-Lock butyl valve ensures that it is practically airtight.​

We all should keep in mind that the construction of a standard soccer ball is different than a street soccer ball. When you are playing on street or hard surface, you need a rough and tough ball. The shape needs to be spherical, and the cover/panels should be made out of rubber. They need to be scratch resistant as well. Not only that, if the panels are not hand-stitched with the high-quality seam there is a big chance they will not last long.
The downside? They’re expensive. Like, really expensive, depending on which one you get. Whether you really need one depends on your budget and how you’re going to be using your ball. For example, I use official match balls for practising freekicks because they fly through the air really nicely. However, I don’t use them for training because if I lose my ball I’ll be set back $100-$300.

Voit goes a way back since its foundation in 1922 in providing the best soccer balls to all soccer fans and professional players. By the end of the 1920, the company introduced the first fully molded rubber soccer ball. They also came with the needle like air retention valves. They later invented a technology that allowed the balls to be machine wound with sturdy nylon threads over the rubber bladder. This ensured that the soccer balls would be stronger and more consistent. It also made balls cheaper and more available since they can be produced in mass production.
It depends on its intended use. Soccer ball casings are made from three kinds of synthetic materials. Polyvinyl carbonate (PVC) which is what most less expensive training balls are made from, Polyurethane (PU) which is the preferred ball for soccer tournaments, and a combination of the two. There are also foam and rubber training soccer balls for kids. Some kids' soccer balls are made of 100 percent thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU), which is a kind of foamy casing material so the ball is very soft. There are greater and lesser grades of each kind of material. PU-covered balls are generally softer, livelier, and have a better feel to them, and are what most people seek when looking for a optimal performing soccer ball.
Regardless of how popular the soccer ball is, this is also one of the most durable soccer balls that we reviewed. This starts with the casing, which is made out of PVC. While this is not the best material for touch, PVC is one of the most durable materials used for soccer ball casings. On top of the casing, the lining of the Wilson soccer ball is made of nylon that is stronger than the commonly used polyester alternative. Combined, the nylon and PVC also make this the most water-resistant soccer ball on our list.
Still, despite how impressive the materials used for the soccer ball are, Adidas is not done providing one of the best products available. For instance, this ball uses thermal bonding instead of either hand or machine stitching. This has the advantage of allowing the ball to fly truer as well as resisting water better. On top of that, some sellers even have balls with embedded NFC chips, which provide all kinds of valuable feedback information on you play.
For all those budding Pelés, Maradona’s and Messi’s out there (how come nobody wants to be a defender or goalkeeper?) I have put together a guide to the Top Ten most popular and best selling soccer balls available. While having the best soccer ball at your feet will not necessarily make you a better player, every little helps and a quality ball will at least increase your enjoyment of the beautiful game and, quite possibly, your accuracy and ball control. Well, you gotta have faith, don’t you?
In terms of durability, you can’t really go past Select. The polyurethane cover on the Numero 10 is tough enough to withstand dog bites and general wear and tear, but still feels nice and soft when kicked. Although this ball is a bit more expensive than other replicas, it comes with a two year warranty for peace of mind when buying. It also retains its bounce very well over the years – perfect for practising volleys and clearances.
I bought this ball for a non-traditional use: my miniature donkey LOVES to roll and toss balls, and slightly deflated soccer balls seem to be easiest for him to grab. We've had this one for several months now, and it has withstood his rough play extremely well. In fact, I'm back to buy another so we have a backup in case our first gets lost. I definitely recommend!
There are a few variables to keep in mind. If you want to practice your skills and footwork, a size 1 ball is recommend. A size 3 ball is best suited for children ages 8 and younger, whereas a size 4 ball is best for ages 8-12, or a size 5 ball for ages 13 and up. With that in mind, many soccer leagues and clubs have their own specifications when it comes to ball size. If you play on a league, it is recommended to check their regulations first.
The outside of the soccer ball is typically made from one of two materials: PVC or Polyurethane.  PVC is much more affordable and durable, and these are typically seen in training soccer balls because training balls go through much more of a continuous beating.  Polyurethane balls are usually even softer than PVC balls and its ability to go where you want it to go is much better than the PVC balls.  As a result, these are typically higher-end balls.  However, there are still various ways to construct them, and not all PVC or polyurethane balls are created the same.  Glossy coatings, which are very popular in the public fields with the kids and adults alike, are also very useful because they help reduce scuffing and the intake of water.

I bought three and used them for juggling, shooting practice and kicking against a wall. I juggled 90,000 times in 3 months, and shot many times on goal and kicked against walls. These are very durable. I look for durability in practice balls and these are superb. I wonder if Wilson has the newer cover pattern with the same internal structure in any model of ball. It would be wise to do that for the sake of staying current. I love the feel when kicking. Variable amounts of air can be used based on personal preference while practicing. A little less air allows a more forgiving bounce while juggling.
Really liked the ball, great at first. But after a little over 2 hours worth of use i noticed that it already had some holes, after fiddling with it for a half hour i've come to the conclusion that its pointless to keep pumping air into it and threw it in the trash. The customer service was good though and they sent me a new one about a week after i complained.
This is exactly the niche that American Challenge’s Brasilia soccer ball is supposed to fill. With a combination of materials that offer a range of different qualities, the Brasilia is able to transition seamlessly from dirt and turf to an indoor court or even on the street. This begins with a casing that is made of TPU. This provides the requisite durability needed while still offering some responsiveness. On top of that, the glossy finish actually benefits this ball in these settings rather hindering it.
Whereas plenty of manufacturers that we reviewed opted to go with a soccer ball that was more durable than responsive, Mikasa takes the opposite approach and focuses primarily on the touch that their ball can provide. This is most apparent in the soccer ball’s choice of casing material. The synthetic leather casing of the Mikasa is by far the softest and naturally responsive-without the inclusion of texture-out of any other soccer ball we reviewed. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3OKagE2ZIRA
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