In the year 1863, the first specifications for footballs were laid down by the Football Association. Previous to this, footballs were made out of inflated leather, with later leather coverings to help footballs maintain their shapes.[3] In 1872 the specifications were revised, and these rules have been left essentially unchanged as defined by the International Football Association Board. Differences in footballs created since this rule came into effect have been to do with the material used in their creation.
Comfort during the shot should be the number one factor to watch out when you are buying a beach soccer ball. Senda Playa offers you that comfort from its larger, and softer panels. So, you will find it very easy to shot the ball barefooted. The panels are scratch-resistant too that makes it suitable for playing on the rough sand beach. No doubt, like any other beach ball, this one also offers water-resistant cover too.
Early footballs began as animal bladders or stomachs that would easily fall apart if kicked too much. Improvements became possible in the 19th century with the introduction of rubber and discoveries of vulcanization by Charles Goodyear. The modern 32-panel ball design was developed in 1962 by Eigil Nielsen, and technological research continues today to develop footballs with improved performance. The 32-panel ball design was soon overcome by 24-panel balls as well as 42-panel balls, both of which improved performance compared to before, in 2007.[citation needed]
The outside of the soccer ball is typically made from one of two materials: PVC or Polyurethane.  PVC is much more affordable and durable, and these are typically seen in training soccer balls because training balls go through much more of a continuous beating.  Polyurethane balls are usually even softer than PVC balls and its ability to go where you want it to go is much better than the PVC balls.  As a result, these are typically higher-end balls.  However, there are still various ways to construct them, and not all PVC or polyurethane balls are created the same.  Glossy coatings, which are very popular in the public fields with the kids and adults alike, are also very useful because they help reduce scuffing and the intake of water.

Much as we are grateful to use the latest technology in our balls, you still need the right soccer ball to add to your soccer equipment. Different things need to be put into consideration including but not limited to, the level of play, material, quality, and ball size. We’ve taken all these into account when preparing this list of the best football balls available on the 2018 market so be sure to read on.
The cheaper balls only have two polyester layers on their lining. Soccer ball bladders can be made from two different kinds of materials. They can either be latex or butyl. A soccer ball bladder is a component of a soccer ball and it is tasked in containing the air that is within the ball. It also contributes to its shape and the ball’s receptiveness on the field.

Outside of PU and TPU, pretty much every other material used for a soccer ball’s casing will be specialized for either durability or responsiveness. When it comes to synthetic leather, the focus is also exclusively on responsiveness and this is by far the most responsive material used for a soccer ball’s casing. It is important to note that PU, TPU, and PVC are all often labeled as synthetic leather.
Whereas plenty of manufacturers that we reviewed opted to go with a soccer ball that was more durable than responsive, Mikasa takes the opposite approach and focuses primarily on the touch that their ball can provide. This is most apparent in the soccer ball’s choice of casing material. The synthetic leather casing of the Mikasa is by far the softest and naturally responsive-without the inclusion of texture-out of any other soccer ball we reviewed. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3OKagE2ZIRA
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