What is the difference between a high quality soccer ball and a low quality soccer ball? When purchasing soccer balls, many people buy according to the price of the ball. If a ball is expensive, that meant that it is a high quality ball and if it was a low costing ball, the ball is a low quality. That is not always true. Many players, coaches, clubs and even professionals do not know what type of ball to buy for their particular needs.  Please go to the following Soccer Ball World page to start learning about the construction of the various types of soccer balls, click here.
The interior of the 1GK USA is a bit more mixed in terms of quality than the exterior is. However, the materials used are explicitly designed to increase the ball’s responsiveness-likely to make up for its uncommon rolling and flight patterns due to the butyl fins. Still, aside from being the only hand-sewn ball, this is also the only ball made with a latex bladder on our list. The potential downside is the cotton lining which will get heavy when wet-though it is much softer and provides better responsiveness than either polyester or nylon.
Rounding out our list is just a good old, cool-looking training ball from the people over at Puma.  This ball comes will three distinct colors on it.  Black is in the middle of pink and yellow, so this would be an absolute dream for the soccer-loving girl in your life!  It is machine stitched for durability and a very soft feel.  It holds up for extended periods of time and does so starting at a very low price, so take a look for yourself!

Why do I always have to pump up even expensive balls? Many balls use bladders made out of latex. Natural Latex Rubber bladders offer the softest feel and response, but do not provide the best air retention. Micro pores slowly let air escape. Balls with natural rubber bladders need to be re-inflated more often than balls with butyl bladders. Even after one or two days, the latex bladder will leak enough air so that you will have to inflate the ball back to recommended pressure. Some balls use carbon-latex bladders in which the carbon powder helps to close the micro pores. Soccer balls with carbon latex bladders usually increase air retention to approximately one week. Of course, check the ball for punctures that may cause the air to leak out.


However, this has not stopped players from preferring butyl as their bladder material of choice. In fact, this preference is so well cemented by players of all skill sets, that manufacturers professional game balls are just as likely to use butyl bladders as they are latex often times even more likely. It is interesting to note that butyl is more durable than latex but less durable than rubber-despite providing had better air retention.
Customers really enjoyed the speed of this ball on the ground, although this exterior TPU was a little slick when making contact for a kick. Users really enjoyed the low price of this soccer ball replica vs. the exact ball that the pros use in European match play. You just need to make sure that you have your own ball bump because the ball does not come inflated.

Much like the Adidas ball we saw earlier, this offering from Adidas is top-of-the-line.  This a premium match ball that also has received the highest rating from FIFA.  To get that rating, it passed tests on its weight, how it retains air, the shape, and how well it keeps water out.  It also has seamless panels like the Hi-Vis Champions League ball.  Although not a cheap ball, this is worth a look if you are interested I premium match balls.
Regardless of how popular the soccer ball is, this is also one of the most durable soccer balls that we reviewed. This starts with the casing, which is made out of PVC. While this is not the best material for touch, PVC is one of the most durable materials used for soccer ball casings. On top of the casing, the lining of the Wilson soccer ball is made of nylon that is stronger than the commonly used polyester alternative. Combined, the nylon and PVC also make this the most water-resistant soccer ball on our list.
This ball truly lives up to its name as a “glider,” having a stable flight path when shot and a nice feel when passed. The surface is relatively grippy, which is great for goalkeepers looking to practice their catches. Because the ball isn’t as slippery as some other replicas, you can shoot it with a bit more swerve, and dribbling and skill moves are a bit easier.
For all those budding Pelés, Maradona’s and Messi’s out there (how come nobody wants to be a defender or goalkeeper?) I have put together a guide to the Top Ten most popular and best selling soccer balls available. While having the best soccer ball at your feet will not necessarily make you a better player, every little helps and a quality ball will at least increase your enjoyment of the beautiful game and, quite possibly, your accuracy and ball control. Well, you gotta have faith, don’t you?
This can be used as a great option for goalkeeper training as well. Why? Look, you can hardly see the lines on this ball, hence you won’t be able to guess the direction by only seeing the spin of the ball. That means as a goalkeeper you will have to give full concentration to detect the direction of the sliding balls. This is obviously helpful if you are a goalkeeper, and looking for a sliding challenge.
1. The 2018 FIFA World Cup in Russia stole the attention of soccer fans around the globe this summer and the tournaments official ball, the adidas Telstar 18 World Cup Official Match Soccer Ball, ran away with the title ‘Best Selling Soccer Ball of 2018.’ (We don’t see any ball catching it over the next months). The ball was inspired by the famous Telstar ball that debuted at the 1970 FIFA World Cup in Mexico and released in November 2017. The design drew some criticism from fans but once on the field it lived up to its namesake in looks and performance.
Whereas plenty of manufacturers that we reviewed opted to go with a soccer ball that was more durable than responsive, Mikasa takes the opposite approach and focuses primarily on the touch that their ball can provide. This is most apparent in the soccer ball’s choice of casing material. The synthetic leather casing of the Mikasa is by far the softest and naturally responsive-without the inclusion of texture-out of any other soccer ball we reviewed.
This match ball is an updated version of the popular Nike Ordem Professional soccer ball. Its goal is to withstand high-level play. A fuse-welded synthetic leather casing is optimal for touch and response. It also has a restricted six-wing carbon latex bladder for maximum air retention and explosiveness. The wrapped bladder also gives it a perfectly round shape, touch, and bounce. High contrast graphic design creates better visibility for this match soccer ball. Overall, this official match soccer ball boasts of 40% synthetic leather, 30% rubber, 20% polyester, and 10% cotton.
A tribute to one of the richest teams in the world, Paris St. Germain, this ball is dressed in their colors.  This is a ball meant for everyday use, so you can get out there and show off your favorite club to everyone.  It is made from polyurethane and has some polyester inside of it, making it slightly different than the Messi ball.  The polyester buttresses the butyl bladder, causing it to retain air and shape.  It is machine stitched and has 26 panels, so it may take a little bit of getting used to the first time.  Like the Messi ball, it comes at a pretty steep price, so it may be a little pricey if you aren’t a PSG fan!

If you've ever noticed, a traditional soccer ball resembles a geodesic dome building. Such as the one designed by architect, Richard Buckminster Fuller. Thus the ball became called the Buckminster Ball. Or more simply, the "Buckeyball". The design is characterized by a pattern of twenty hexagon pieces, and twelve pentagon pieces, fitted together to create a perfect sphere. The soccer ball has undergone many design changes of various-shaped panels stitched together. But until the geodesic dome-like ball, it was never quite round enough to perform right. Manufacturers settled upon the modern thirty-two panel design, which enables the ball to roll and spin more evenly and smoothly. Which is probably why it's the most popular competition soccer ball on the market today. The Buckminister-style soccer ball was first sold in the 1950s, and debuted in the 1970 World Cup tournament.
Much like PU or TPU for soccer ball casings, rubber is considered the best of both worlds for soccer ball bladders when it comes to striking a balance between responsiveness and air retention. Oddly enough, this balance does not actually inspire a greater adoption by either manufacturers or players, and as such, soccer balls with rubber bladders are less popular.
A quick inspection of the construction of the ball might help you make a quick decision. The first thing that you should look at is the panel of the ball. A soccer ball that has panels sewn together is a better choice than the ones that are glued together. The panels of a premium ball are stitched by hand while those of a lower quality are machine stitched.
Though, a ball designed to be played virtually anywhere will have to sacrifice something to achieve that versatility. For the Brasilia, that sacrifice comes in the form of responsiveness. While the glossy finish may offer some protection, it also reduces your touch with the ball. A bladder made out of synthetic rubber-not to mention that TPU is only okay when it comes to touch in the first place, further compounds this effect.
Best of the Rest – The World Soccer Shop Heritage Ball was designed to have a vintage look with the 18 panel, brown leather design. It probably won’t feature in any competitive matches but is a great all-around ball for a casual kickaround. As the official ball of the NCAA it is not a surprise that the Wilson Avanti NCAA Official Championship Soccer Ball is a top seller.

Built for durability, recreation balls are made of soft synthetic materials for play on nearly any field. Typically, these balls are slightly heavier for beginner’s slower play, yet, competitors of all skill levels use these balls for practice and recreation on hard turf fields due to their resilience. Machine-stitching is the most stand-out visual difference between match balls and training balls and it offers a consistent touch for any player.

This is a great ball with a fantastic design. The black is more gray than black, but the combination with yellow is a great contrast that gives you a distinctive ball on the field. Besides looks, equally important is performance, and this Franklin Sports Blackhawk Soccer Ball, Black, Size 5 rises to the challenge. It handles well, and its durable construction holds up to regular use. The air bladder keeps the ball at peak inflation, and minimizes the frequency of additional inflation.
Training balls are ideal for training and recreational use. These are the least expensive and more durable compared to professional match balls as they are meant to be continuously used for an extended period of time. This type of ball is usually constructed with 4 or fewer layers. The casing is made of PVC which makes its quality lower compared to a professional match soccer ball. Usually, the panels of a practice ball are molded together and not stitched together. These type of balls can withstand rough surfaces such as; asphalt and concrete.
Wilson is a classic sports company that gives you just about everything that you need in a soccer ball. This ball has a synthetic leather cover which is soft to the kick, but also has enhanced ball durability. It has a butyl rubber bladder to hold the air which gives the ball its shape and and retains the air. This has the classic black and white panel colors.
If you're headed to the park to play a quick pickup game, brightly colored adidas soccer balls can help make it easy to distinguish your match from other games that might be being played nearby. Dribbling skills conducted with mini Nike soccer balls can hone your control skills, so you can glide past defenders with ease. Look for 12-panel soccer balls that provide a true, accurate flight with each strike, and rubber butyl bladders that offer excellent shape and air retention, so you can quickly jump into a game without looking for a pump. If you prefer playing indoors, check out a futsal ball that's slightly smaller than regulation soccer balls and is designed for use on hard indoor courts.

You just can’t avoid the name of Lionel Messi in the soccer world anymore!  And with this ball, Adidas promises to make you like Messi.  Like the last ball, it has a nylon interior and is machine stitched.  It also has a butyl bladder so that it retains air better.  While this ball is surely a good option, it is a little pricey.  The name alone probably drives it up, but if you’re a Messi fan it may well be worth it to you!  And oh, it also looks like a ball from Pokemon!


All in all a street soccer ball needs to be rough and tough with all the attributes we discussed so far. Senda street soccer ball has fulfilled all these requirements, and met our expectation. We recommend you to buy this option if you want to play on street or hard surface. We found this as a good quality model with the proper construction as we discussed. The weight and bounce are also according to the requirement of a street soccer ball.

What size soccer ball should I buy? The first step in purchasing soccer balls is determining the proper size(s) to buy. Many soccer leagues have different size requirements, so be sure to check with your coach or organization to find out which size ball to buy. Soccer balls for match use come in three different sizes which range from size 3 to size 5. For more information on soccer ball sizes, click here.

This soccer ball is virtually indestructible. The manufacturers have designed it to withstand any challenge yet still keep afloat. It can be run over by a truck yet it will still maintain its balance. Set it ablaze and it will still hold its ground. Instead of air, this ball uses a unique foam known as ethylene-vinyl acetate foam. With this, the ball will never need a pump and will never go flat even when punctured. This special foam reinflates the ball when the need arises. This is a durable ball and you can use it on all types of playgrounds: concrete, grass, sand or any other surface.

This is a decision that your coach or manager get to decide for you if you are part of a team. Your own ball is one thing that you have control on. However, when it comes to what the team should play with, it is the manager’s job to pick which ball is the best, and what is appropriate for the team for training. Coaches usually stick to training match balls as they give the illusion of actual match balls.
Built for durability, recreation balls are made of soft synthetic materials for play on nearly any field. Typically, these balls are slightly heavier for beginner’s slower play, yet, competitors of all skill levels use these balls for practice and recreation on hard turf fields due to their resilience. Machine-stitching is the most stand-out visual difference between match balls and training balls and it offers a consistent touch for any player.
In terms of durability, you can’t really go past Select. The polyurethane cover on the Numero 10 is tough enough to withstand dog bites and general wear and tear, but still feels nice and soft when kicked. Although this ball is a bit more expensive than other replicas, it comes with a two year warranty for peace of mind when buying. It also retains its bounce very well over the years – perfect for practising volleys and clearances.
How Do I inflate my soccer balls? Soccer balls lose air pressure over time. Sometimes over a few days (soccer balls that use butyl bladders keep air pressure longer than balls that use latex bladders). Be sure to check the pressure frequently to make sure the ball is properly inflated.  Therefore, invest in a good ball pump, have a supply of inflation needles and use a low pressure gauge to measure for proper inflation. 
Only size 5, and size 4 are available for this. Although this should not be a major problem as this is for recreational play and practicing purpose, so kids are ok to play with this as well. In fact, the ball that will be given away to the developing countries will be used by the kids mostly. If you are buying this for an adult go for size 5, and if you are buying for kids or youth players then better go for size 4.
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