Wilson is a great supplier for high schools and colleges, much like Select, and this ball will continue that legacy.  Its fused panel and new “hybrid” technology help lower the amount of water that enters the ball, thus allowing it to be much more durable.  It claims to have 32 “premium” panels that give you a flight that you can control and predict as well as equal airflow throughout its surface.  It is also a highly visible orange, so it will turn a few heads.  Combine that with a very reasonable price, and this is an overall great soccer ball for student-athletes.

Though, a ball designed to be played virtually anywhere will have to sacrifice something to achieve that versatility. For the Brasilia, that sacrifice comes in the form of responsiveness. While the glossy finish may offer some protection, it also reduces your touch with the ball. A bladder made out of synthetic rubber-not to mention that TPU is only okay when it comes to touch in the first place, further compounds this effect.

What are the different types of soccer balls? Should I buy an expensive one, a middle priced one or a cheap one? What kind of balls are adequate for my needs?  Most soccer balls can be divided into three different categories, professional match balls, match balls, and practice balls.  The type you need of course depends on how and where you want to use the soccer ball. For more information on types of soccer balls, click here. 


Another thing how I picked best soccer balls under $100 was recommendations by other who have already bought it. I searched on the web and also asked some of my teammates that are also a lot in to it. I than merged all opinions and made a list of top 5 soccer balls under 100$ which you can find above in the table! If you really have a low budget look at cheap soccer balls.

Sizing is very important in selecting a soccer ball.  For the purposes of this article, I will mostly concentrate on size 5 outdoor soccer balls, but I will quickly go over the various sizes and let you know what they are used for.  Size 1 soccer balls, or skill balls (also known as mini balls), are primarily used by youth players that are just being introduced to the game.  These are typically 1-3-year-olds.  Another use for Size 1 balls is for older players to learn to juggle.  It is much harder to juggle a size 1, so instead of using a hacky sack, they use a skill ball.  This is done because the texture and materials are similar.  Size 3 balls are slightly bigger than size 1 and are used for ages four through seven.  They do this so that the ball isn’t too big in comparison to the players.  Size 4 balls are used for age eight through eleven.  Size 4s are smaller than size 5, which is used for everyone past the age of eleven.  This is the same size that the professionals use.  Making sure that you have the proper ball is just as important as picking out which materials one has.
Inflate soccer balls to the pressure of 6-8 PPI (pounds per square inch). A pressure gauge will tell you when the air is enough. Under or over-inflating a soccer ball will shorten its life in one way or another. When under-inflated, the ball will not be resistant to the impact of kicks. On the other hand, over inflation will stretch out the bladder and put pressure on the panel stitches.
Over time, many soccer balls tend to go out-of-round, especially if they are well-used. The Glider is designed to maintain its shape without losing air thanks to the firmness and consistency of the butyl bladder. Under regular use, we found that the air pressure was consistent enough that we didn’t need to add more air to the ball. If you play in organized soccer, then having consistency from the practice ball to the game ball is very important for skill development. The machine-stitched panels offer that experience for most players, even though the ball has the standard panel design.
How Do I inflate my soccer balls? Soccer balls lose air pressure over time. Sometimes over a few days (soccer balls that use butyl bladders keep air pressure longer than balls that use latex bladders). Be sure to check the pressure frequently to make sure the ball is properly inflated.  Therefore, invest in a good ball pump, have a supply of inflation needles and use a low pressure gauge to measure for proper inflation. 
Whereas plenty of manufacturers that we reviewed opted to go with a soccer ball that was more durable than responsive, Mikasa takes the opposite approach and focuses primarily on the touch that their ball can provide. This is most apparent in the soccer ball’s choice of casing material. The synthetic leather casing of the Mikasa is by far the softest and naturally responsive-without the inclusion of texture-out of any other soccer ball we reviewed. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3OKagE2ZIRA
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