Many stores have a very large selection of soccer balls. How do I pick out the best ball for my money?  First know what type of soccer ball is best for your needs and how much you want to spend.  Also, research what materials make up the best soccer balls.  Of course you can use Soccer Ball World as a buying guide. Our store has four balls to meet most players needs from professional to practice soccer balls.
Crafted by Adidas, the Telstar 18 is the official ball of the FIFA World Cup. Drawing inspiration from the company's first World Cup match ball, which debuted at the 1970 tournament in Mexico, the new ball reimagines the 12 black panels on an otherwise white design. Fun fact: the iconic original black and white ball was made that way to be more visible for black-and-white TV viewers, and it was dubbed the "star of television."
After reading this article, I would like to start off with saying this definitely covers 99% of what you need to know about soccer balls. As a 7 year previous soccer player, I played between both defense and forward positions… both of which are very active positions during a game. That being said, for someone like me that is very knowledgeable with anything related to soccer, I would recommend this article to anyone that needed in-depth information based on the #1 point of interest related to soccer, the soccer ball. For anyone curious or new to soccer, the ball is the first thing you should learn about. This article will no doubt help you on what type of soccer best suits you and makes it very clear and simple. Bottom line, this article receives an A+ from me with everything covering all the different types of soccer balls.
Due to it being significantly softer than the other types of rubbers used for soccer ball bladders, latex is generally seen as the premier material. Though, this same perception may not hold as true for practice balls or even game balls at lower levels of competition. This is because latex bladders retain air worse than all of the other soccer ball bladder materials and will need to be re-inflated more often.

Yesterday’s balls had stitches and seams in them like American footballs have!  They slowly transitioned away from that to the classic black and white soccer ball.  From there, we saw the invention of panels.  And finally today, we are left with the maneuverability of multi-panels and other technologies which allow the ball to fly quicker, bend more, and dip harder.  In addition to these changes, another simple fact that should be noted is that the fact has become softer over time.  This allows players to be able to kick the ball further and not risk injury.


The bladder, or the inside, of the soccer ball, is also very important to talk about.  There are typically only two choices that they are made out of butyl and latex.  The higher-end balls usually are latex while butyl is typically meant for training balls.  However, butyl is much better at keeping the air and shape of the ball for longer periods!   
Latex bladders are one of the best materials when it comes to ball construction. However, with latex bladders, air won’t last as long as butyl bladders and will need more attention for proper inflation. Butyl-blend bladders hold in the air much better, but they are harder and less receptive in play. Mid-priced balls will usually have a mix of butyl and rubber. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c1SVcjYY6TE
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