In early FIFA World Cups, match balls were mostly provided by the hosts from local suppliers. Records indicate a variety of models being used within individual tournaments and even, on some occasions, individual games. Over time, FIFA took more control over the choice of ball used. Since 1970 Adidas have supplied official match balls for every tournament.[19]
The ball has a solid feel and will not deflate quickly. It’s fun and colorful design makes it easy to spot on the playground aside from making it look elegant with the Nike Company logo perfectly completing the design. It has great customer reviews because aside from having a great look and made from high-quality materials, it has a wallet-friendly price tag you’ll want to purchase it for your little ones.
This particular indoor ball has all the qualities that make it ideal for an indoor soccer ball. The exterior uses a soft felt material. The panels of this size 5 indoor ball are hand stitched which makes it more durable than machine stitched panels. Its bounce is not too high which sits well with the requirements of an indoor soccer ball. It is not too bouncy or light but it flies rather well when kicked. This gives the player ample control during a session. It has a comfortable texture that’s pleasant to hold, for a goalkeeper and comfortable for footwork especially if the player is barefooted. Has a bright color that makes it visible during a game. Players can easily keep track of it, especially in an indoor setting.
It depends on its intended use. Soccer ball casings are made from three kinds of synthetic materials. Polyvinyl carbonate (PVC) which is what most less expensive training balls are made from, Polyurethane (PU) which is the preferred ball for soccer tournaments, and a combination of the two. There are also foam and rubber training soccer balls for kids. Some kids' soccer balls are made of 100 percent thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU), which is a kind of foamy casing material so the ball is very soft. There are greater and lesser grades of each kind of material. PU-covered balls are generally softer, livelier, and have a better feel to them, and are what most people seek when looking for a optimal performing soccer ball.
Furthermore, cleaning the ball is a very important task that you must do on a regular basis. It could help you avoid water absorption issues, and it will help make it last longer. Clean a soccer ball with some mild soap and lukewarm water to maintain its performance. Don’t use harsh cleaning agents as this might damage the ball’s construction material. Storing the ball in low temperatures is ideal to avoid warping or water retention.

All in all a street soccer ball needs to be rough and tough with all the attributes we discussed so far. Senda street soccer ball has fulfilled all these requirements, and met our expectation. We recommend you to buy this option if you want to play on street or hard surface. We found this as a good quality model with the proper construction as we discussed. The weight and bounce are also according to the requirement of a street soccer ball.
This ball truly lives up to its name as a “glider,” having a stable flight path when shot and a nice feel when passed. The surface is relatively grippy, which is great for goalkeepers looking to practice their catches. Because the ball isn’t as slippery as some other replicas, you can shoot it with a bit more swerve, and dribbling and skill moves are a bit easier.
What are the requirements of a soccer ball used in matches?  Requirement information for soccer balls are usually found with the officiating organization that the match or game is played under. Contact the organization that runs the game that the soccer ball is going to be used in.  To learn more about the soccer ball laws of FIFA and NFHS, click here.

Bouncing a few ideas around on how to improve your game? You might just start with your soccer ball. As we know, the game of soccer involves a lot of fancy footwork, technique, and team work. But what it really comes down to is how well your soccer ball performs for you. Whether you're coaching, playing, or have a child in a soccer league, knowing a little more about the soccer ball, such as how to select one, how to tell a good soccer ball from a cheap one, and how to take care of it, can help you get the most out of yours. And that just might be all you need to kick your season off on the right foot this year.

We covered the quality in small detail above, but we’ll look into a little further here.  The quality of the ball you pick is very important.  If you want exactly what the pros play with, then you will have to pay a little more as a result of picking the premium choice. Those balls fly better and more true than their counterparts, but they are not meant to be practiced with on a regular basis.  Premium balls tend to have a softer impact on both your cleats and ankle guards to allow for more ball control and handling.  After the “premium” match ball category is the “match ball” category.  These aren’t nearly as expensive as the premiums are, but are still very good in match situations.  These aren’t meant for practice, but they typically can hold up for extended periods of time, possibly a season or two.  The third type is “training balls.”  These balls are meant for training and practice, and they can be used continuously without doing damage to it.  I have some great training balls that have lasted upwards of six years!  The quality of training balls has gone up drastically over the years that I have been playing.  When I was younger, some of them were so hard that you’d feel like your foot was broken after kicking them.  Nowadays, they literally feel like a premium ball with their softness and their flight.  So, almost any ball is great nowadays from the right supplier!


The soccer ball has gone through various changes just as the football game. As opposed to yesterday’s football ball that had stitches and seams and the classic black and white design, today’s soccer balls are designed with the latest technology that lets the ball bend more, fly quicker and also dip harder. Besides, they are quite soft that they let players kick the ball further without risking injuries. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DGp37du0xbQ
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