Voit goes a way back since its foundation in 1922 in providing the best soccer balls to all soccer fans and professional players. By the end of the 1920, the company introduced the first fully molded rubber soccer ball. They also came with the needle like air retention valves. They later invented a technology that allowed the balls to be machine wound with sturdy nylon threads over the rubber bladder. This ensured that the soccer balls would be stronger and more consistent. It also made balls cheaper and more available since they can be produced in mass production.
A tribute to one of the richest teams in the world, Paris St. Germain, this ball is dressed in their colors.  This is a ball meant for everyday use, so you can get out there and show off your favorite club to everyone.  It is made from polyurethane and has some polyester inside of it, making it slightly different than the Messi ball.  The polyester buttresses the butyl bladder, causing it to retain air and shape.  It is machine stitched and has 26 panels, so it may take a little bit of getting used to the first time.  Like the Messi ball, it comes at a pretty steep price, so it may be a little pricey if you aren’t a PSG fan!
Another type of soccer ball that some players may find to be useful is the indoor soccer ball. Indoor balls are designed to have less bounce and rebound to them, making it possible to control the ball on a tighter court or field. The cover of an indoor ball is also the strongest of any category, so it can withstand play on turn, hard court surfaces, and impacts with walls.
So it is now clear to you that you won’t have to worry about the air retention capability, durability. 

Now, how good is the playability? Well, in terms of rebounding, this ball performs almost like a standard ball but obviously not exactly like standard balls. Having said that, we must say the rebound is enough for recreational play and practicing purpose. You will also find this ball a bit heavier than standard balls during the shots. That is why we don’t suggest you use this option for tournament play.
The downside? They’re expensive. Like, really expensive, depending on which one you get. Whether you really need one depends on your budget and how you’re going to be using your ball. For example, I use official match balls for practising freekicks because they fly through the air really nicely. However, I don’t use them for training because if I lose my ball I’ll be set back $100-$300.

Soccer balls have several panels that influence their flight characteristics and the amount of control a player can have while playing. International soccer competitions use a 32-panel ball. Major leagues use an 18-panel ball and indoor leagues use a 6-panel ball. High-end soccer balls have hand-stitched panels with a synthetic thread. A low-cost one for practice and training will usually have its panels glued together.
Of everything that we have analyzed about these soccer balls, one of the biggest things that you can look at for is the external material of the ball. TPU seems like it is the standard in durability for soccer balls in this price range. Machine stitching is another thing that you want to make sure that you have, as it appears that some balls that are stitched otherwise can split open and leak. In any case, make sure that you have your own soccer pump so that you can always be sure that your soccer ball is properly inflated.
On the other hand, replicas (sometimes called training balls or gliders) are designed to be just like the official match balls but are much cheaper. Their panels are often stitched rather than thermally-bonded and are made of a different material. However, they’re not necessarily less durable than official match balls. So, they’re the recommended option for most players.
Thanks to technology, finding a soccer ball is easy. Simply go online, research on the best balls out there, narrow down your search the top 10, 5 or 3 then read the reviews of people who have actually used them before. Thereafter, you can weigh the pros and cons to determine which ball is the best pick for you. The top 3 places to research on are:
Adidas spared little expense with this soccer ball and made sure that the materials used could pass almost any standard for grass fields. First, the casing is made of polyurethane, providing a great balance between responsiveness and durability-though they further increased the responsiveness with 3D textures. The bladder is made out of butyl, so you will not have to worry about constantly reinflating it, while the ball is lined with soft and water-resistant polyester.
Keep your skills sharp and work on your craft with signature soccer balls from Nike. Engineered with a 12-panel design for true, accurate ball flight and control, Nike soccer balls come in a variety of color combinations and include a two-year stitch and shape guarantee. Whether you're a young athlete just learning the game or a seasoned veteran looking to refine your skills, Nike has soccer balls to help you get to that next level. All soccer balls come in a range of sizes depending on your age level. Buy Size 5 for ages 12 and up, Size 4 for ages 8-12, and Size 3 for ages 8 and under. Combine soccer balls with signature Nike soccer shoes, and put in the time to master your touch. Shop Nike soccer balls for men, women and kids, and be sure to explore the complete collection of Nike soccer accessories for additional gear, including soccer pants and shirts.
Why do some soccer balls get bigger over time?  Many soccer balls do tend to get larger over time. Especially lower quality balls! This is due to the pressure of the bladder against the linings and cover.  Over time the material and stitching may stretch out causing the ball to become larger. Also, soccer ball abuse may cause the stitching to loosen and the ball to expand.
The inner lining and the bladder are some of the key components of a soccer ball’s construction. These components are the factors that give control to the shape and the feel of a soccer ball. The usual match soccer ball has four layers of a blended polyester and cotton material in its lining, while mid-range ones have two cotton and polyester layers.
What size soccer ball should I buy? The first step in purchasing soccer balls is determining the proper size(s) to buy. Many soccer leagues have different size requirements, so be sure to check with your coach or organization to find out which size ball to buy. Soccer balls for match use come in three different sizes which range from size 3 to size 5. For more information on soccer ball sizes, click here.
This ball has seen a lot of use since Christmas, and while that's not a good indication of how long the batteries and lights will last, my kids have been having a blast with it at night. This ball isn't like a normal soccer ball, it's more of a smooth rubber, so it won't have the same feel as a normal ball. It feels heavier to me too, but I didn't confirm that on the scale. Once or twice the ball turned off in use, but came back on after a minute. I recommend this ball as an outdoor nighttime novelty ball, certainly not a competition ball. And the 5-star rating is directly from my 8-year-old son. His words, "I love it!"
Looking for a decent soccer ball? The time was when you were looking for a soccer ball you just popped into your local toy store, paid a few dollars and headed off to the local park. Times have changed and, today, soccer is big business as is the market in soccer balls. With so many manufacturers making so many claims about their latest high-tech ball, just how do you find the best soccer ball available in your price range?
Shop hand-stitched, machine-stitched and thermally bonded soccer balls for the size and construction you're looking for, like size 5 soccer balls, including adult soccer balls and kids soccer balls. Check out soccer balls from top brands, including adidas® soccer balls, Nike® soccer balls and Select® soccer balls. Shop the best soccer balls for top-rated styles.
Footballs have gone through a dramatic change over time. During medieval times balls were normally made from an outer shell of leather filled with cork shavings.[4] Another method of creating a ball was using animal bladders for the inside of the ball making it inflatable. However, these two styles of creating footballs made it easy for the ball to puncture and were inadequate for kicking. It was not until the 19th century that footballs developed into what a football looks like today.
Bouncing a few ideas around on how to improve your game? You might just start with your soccer ball. As we know, the game of soccer involves a lot of fancy footwork, technique, and team work. But what it really comes down to is how well your soccer ball performs for you. Whether you're coaching, playing, or have a child in a soccer league, knowing a little more about the soccer ball, such as how to select one, how to tell a good soccer ball from a cheap one, and how to take care of it, can help you get the most out of yours. And that just might be all you need to kick your season off on the right foot this year.
Crafted by Adidas, the Telstar 18 is the official ball of the FIFA World Cup. Drawing inspiration from the company's first World Cup match ball, which debuted at the 1970 tournament in Mexico, the new ball reimagines the 12 black panels on an otherwise white design. Fun fact: the iconic original black and white ball was made that way to be more visible for black-and-white TV viewers, and it was dubbed the "star of television."
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