Due to it being significantly softer than the other types of rubbers used for soccer ball bladders, latex is generally seen as the premier material. Though, this same perception may not hold as true for practice balls or even game balls at lower levels of competition. This is because latex bladders retain air worse than all of the other soccer ball bladder materials and will need to be re-inflated more often.
I bought three and used them for juggling, shooting practice and kicking against a wall. I juggled 90,000 times in 3 months, and shot many times on goal and kicked against walls. These are very durable. I look for durability in practice balls and these are superb. I wonder if Wilson has the newer cover pattern with the same internal structure in any model of ball. It would be wise to do that for the sake of staying current. I love the feel when kicking. Variable amounts of air can be used based on personal preference while practicing. A little less air allows a more forgiving bounce while juggling.
Our main intention of discussing the different types of balls is to educate you so that you can buy the right product. For example using practice balls on the street will bring you no good but some awful experiences as the ball will not last long. Similarly, an indoor soccer ball is not good to play on a beach. Keep this in mind when buying, and using a ball.
Furthermore, cleaning the ball is a very important task that you must do on a regular basis. It could help you avoid water absorption issues, and it will help make it last longer. Clean a soccer ball with some mild soap and lukewarm water to maintain its performance. Don’t use harsh cleaning agents as this might damage the ball’s construction material. Storing the ball in low temperatures is ideal to avoid warping or water retention. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_TX8dExPIWc
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