When a tournament is held (like the FIFA World Cup), the sponsor of the event will design a brand new ball. These are official match balls – they’re used by professionals during real matches. They are designed to the highest possible build quality, have textured surfaces to improve stability in flight, and feature thermally-bonded panels for durability.
NOTE: This article lists and reviews size 5 soccer balls only. You should also know that we are linking out to Amazon and earning a small commission at no extra cost to you from every sale ONLY if you do decide to complete a purchase. This is how we’re able to maintain our website up and running. Nevertheless, we only recommend products or services that we tried, used, like and honestly think may be the best fit for your particular needs.
This next soccer ball is truly one of a kind! The Adidas miCoach Smart Soccer Ball uses a training tool application coupled with your Bluetooth device to optimize your training time and hone your skills. It is the most expensive of all the options here, but it also offers the most in technology and training. This is a top contender for best soccer ball, just for the technology portions alone!
You have to wonder if a brand recognized mostly for baseball can make a good soccer ball, but this one seems like a worthy effort. It certainly has the look and feel of a high end ball, and the overall build seems pretty solid. It looks like they put some effort designing this product. My son and his team practiced with this several times and I would say the wear and tear look normal. No tearing at the seams or unusual gashes. He says the padding gives the ball a nice, soft touch even when fully inflated. One bonus is, with such an uncommon soccer brand, it easier to identify if it gets lost on field. The reason for the lack of 5 stars is that our sample has trouble holding air after a couple of days. I do not know if it is a characteristic of the ball or
A tribute to one of the richest teams in the world, Paris St. Germain, this ball is dressed in their colors.  This is a ball meant for everyday use, so you can get out there and show off your favorite club to everyone.  It is made from polyurethane and has some polyester inside of it, making it slightly different than the Messi ball.  The polyester buttresses the butyl bladder, causing it to retain air and shape.  It is machine stitched and has 26 panels, so it may take a little bit of getting used to the first time.  Like the Messi ball, it comes at a pretty steep price, so it may be a little pricey if you aren’t a PSG fan!
The interior of the 1GK USA is a bit more mixed in terms of quality than the exterior is. However, the materials used are explicitly designed to increase the ball’s responsiveness-likely to make up for its uncommon rolling and flight patterns due to the butyl fins. Still, aside from being the only hand-sewn ball, this is also the only ball made with a latex bladder on our list. The potential downside is the cotton lining which will get heavy when wet-though it is much softer and provides better responsiveness than either polyester or nylon.
 I’ll be honest right out of the gate in saying that I don’t have any experience with Senda.  But after looking at this ball, I will have to try one out soon!  Senda brings a very classic look to its ball, giving you a throwback to days gone by.  It has 32 panels and claims that it can be used outdoors, indoors, and on turf.  It is hand stitched with premium leather and has four layers of hybrid polyester and cotton linings between the cover and the bladder to help it last longer.  It is NHFS approved with its latex bladder, so it would be great for use in high school matches.  And especially considering it’s low cost.
A Futsal ball is basically an indoor soccer ball used for playing 'Futsal', a term literally meaning 'indoor football'. Futsal is a kind of soccer played on a basketball-sized court using a smaller, heavier, less bouncy ball, and demands many of the same skills as outdoor soccer. Size-wise, FIFA-approved futsal balls are just shy of 25 inches in circumference, slightly smaller than a Size 4 soccer ball. The ball is created with less bounce to facilitate indoor play.
It depends on its intended use. Soccer ball casings are made from three kinds of synthetic materials. Polyvinyl carbonate (PVC) which is what most less expensive training balls are made from, Polyurethane (PU) which is the preferred ball for soccer tournaments, and a combination of the two. There are also foam and rubber training soccer balls for kids. Some kids' soccer balls are made of 100 percent thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU), which is a kind of foamy casing material so the ball is very soft. There are greater and lesser grades of each kind of material. PU-covered balls are generally softer, livelier, and have a better feel to them, and are what most people seek when looking for a optimal performing soccer ball.
This is much like the kind of balls that I often buy and play with.  This is a training ball, but don’t let that fool you into thinking that means it is low quality. It is machine stitched, meaning it is mass-produced and has a nylon interior, making the ball last a long time as you practice and do your daily drills.  It also has a butyl bladder and is polyurethane so that it will stay inflated longer.  It has a really catchy green and black design and I’m sure all the kids would absolutely love to have this ball (or two) for the great price!
Our family has tried out a lot of value-priced soccer balls over the years. For example, this one was purchased as one of many, including some more expensive models by various manufacturers. But, funny enough, this is the one we always pick when it's time to play. It feels nice and plays nice. Maybe the balls are softer if you spend considerably more, but even at 2-3 times the cost of this ball, we like this one better. So, if you're looking for a soccer ball and you don't want to break the bank, stop searching, just get this one and know you got the right one.
Update (2 years post-purchase): Still love this ball and it's in its fifth season of use! I've just ordered another for our team since the fall season makes for darker and darker practices on our unlighted scrimmage field and we've come to rely on this ball so much. My teenagers use this ball at home all the time, including playing "soccer tennis" on hard surfaces and for banging against a brick wall (all of the print is long gone from the outer surface). We even took it to the beach this year. It never fails to get a reaction from people who see it bouncing around in the dark. I did have to replace one of the two lights, but they're available from GlowCity and are very reasonably priced (I purchased a couple of extra lights, just in case). I also bought a pack of 100
In 1838, Charles Goodyear introduced vulcanized rubber, which dramatically improved the football.[5] Vulcanisation is the treatment of rubber to give it certain qualities such as strength, elasticity, and resistance to solvents. Vulcanisation of rubber also helps the football resist moderate heat and cold. Vulcanisation helped create inflatable bladders that pressurize the outer panel arrangement of the football. Charles Goodyear's innovation increased the bounce ability of the ball and made it easier to kick. Most balls of this time had tanned leather with eighteen sections stitched together. These were arranged in six panels of three strips each.[6][7]
Ok. I was skeptical about this ball...surprisingly it is bright. It seems smaller than a normal soccer ball so I measured it. Yep, 27” as stated. I wonder how long the batteries will last. I’ll update this review after the 1st pair die. feels durable. Lights upon kicking. Takes two sets of batteries to light entire ball so make sure you keep lots of replacements on hand otherwise you’ll end up with 1/2 the ball lit.

These balls were add on items and they were a great price. I got four of them because I started coaching U8 soccer. I didn’t want to spend a lot of money on balls let me get ruined or actually find their way home with one of my players, these were a perfect fit. We are only halfway through the season and they’ve held up great, they’ve even used them as the game ball on a couple occasions. I would recommend this to any soccer coach.


Despite having so many good reviews from the users, why aren’t we keeping Wilson traditional ball on our list? It is because we strongly think Wilson is specialized in making tennis equipment. On the other hand, this model did not meet our expectation. This model seems too heavy to us, and overall feel was not too good. That is why we are not recommending you to go for this option. But obviously, the final decision is yours. So many people are still buying this 🙂
How Do I inflate my soccer balls? Soccer balls lose air pressure over time. Sometimes over a few days (soccer balls that use butyl bladders keep air pressure longer than balls that use latex bladders). Be sure to check the pressure frequently to make sure the ball is properly inflated.  Therefore, invest in a good ball pump, have a supply of inflation needles and use a low pressure gauge to measure for proper inflation. 
As I mentioned above there are thousands of ball that you can choose from, but they are not all good and also we are here focused on best soccer balls under $100. If I would like to make a full review, I would have to buy a lot of balls and test all of them, but this unfortunately is not possible, because I don’t have so much money. Here comes out my experience during my career and other recommendations.
The amount that you are willing to pay for the soccer ball might influence your search. These range in price depending on its type, make, quality and other features. If you are looking for a ball to kick around for fun or for a child as a toy, it is best that you opt for an inexpensive ball as they are likely to ruin the ball or easily get bored with it shortly after. This also applies to children who are in a league as they will soon outgrow the ball hence the need for a bigger and more expensive soccer ball.
Much like the Adidas ball we saw earlier, this offering from Adidas is top-of-the-line.  This a premium match ball that also has received the highest rating from FIFA.  To get that rating, it passed tests on its weight, how it retains air, the shape, and how well it keeps water out.  It also has seamless panels like the Hi-Vis Champions League ball.  Although not a cheap ball, this is worth a look if you are interested I premium match balls.
We covered the quality in small detail above, but we’ll look into a little further here.  The quality of the ball you pick is very important.  If you want exactly what the pros play with, then you will have to pay a little more as a result of picking the premium choice. Those balls fly better and more true than their counterparts, but they are not meant to be practiced with on a regular basis.  Premium balls tend to have a softer impact on both your cleats and ankle guards to allow for more ball control and handling.  After the “premium” match ball category is the “match ball” category.  These aren’t nearly as expensive as the premiums are, but are still very good in match situations.  These aren’t meant for practice, but they typically can hold up for extended periods of time, possibly a season or two.  The third type is “training balls.”  These balls are meant for training and practice, and they can be used continuously without doing damage to it.  I have some great training balls that have lasted upwards of six years!  The quality of training balls has gone up drastically over the years that I have been playing.  When I was younger, some of them were so hard that you’d feel like your foot was broken after kicking them.  Nowadays, they literally feel like a premium ball with their softness and their flight.  So, almost any ball is great nowadays from the right supplier!
Elements of the football that today are tested are the deformation of the football when it is kicked or when the ball hits a surface. Two styles of footballs have been tested by the Sports Technology Research Group of Wolfson School of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering in Loughborough University; these two models are called the Basic FE model and the Developed FE model of the football. The basic model considered the ball as being a spherical shell with isotropic material properties. The developed model also utilised isotropic material properties but included an additional stiffer stitching seam region.
If you've ever noticed, a traditional soccer ball resembles a geodesic dome building. Such as the one designed by architect, Richard Buckminster Fuller. Thus the ball became called the Buckminster Ball. Or more simply, the "Buckeyball". The design is characterized by a pattern of twenty hexagon pieces, and twelve pentagon pieces, fitted together to create a perfect sphere. The soccer ball has undergone many design changes of various-shaped panels stitched together. But until the geodesic dome-like ball, it was never quite round enough to perform right. Manufacturers settled upon the modern thirty-two panel design, which enables the ball to roll and spin more evenly and smoothly. Which is probably why it's the most popular competition soccer ball on the market today. The Buckminister-style soccer ball was first sold in the 1950s, and debuted in the 1970 World Cup tournament.
Really liked the ball, great at first. But after a little over 2 hours worth of use i noticed that it already had some holes, after fiddling with it for a half hour i've come to the conclusion that its pointless to keep pumping air into it and threw it in the trash. The customer service was good though and they sent me a new one about a week after i complained.
Our next soccer ball on the list is the DribbleUp Smart Soccer Ball. This ball is the second (and only other) “smart” ball on our list. Like the Adidas brand ball, this DribbleUp ball is designed for use with a smart device and application for training. There are a lot of features to love about this ball; however, it’s more expensive than the Adidas alternative.

I purchased the soccer ball for my son as a gift. It came deflated so we filled it with air before boxing it. Upon opening it, it was deflated. It only held air for a few hours. I contacted the company and they immediately shipped out a new one without hassle that is holding air just fine. (I was very pleased with how prompt and pleasant they were!) It lights up very bright when hit or bounced and turns off on its own after a little while of not being hit or bounced. My kids all love it and play with it nightly. It is not stitched as a real soccer ball is, but is more of a heat fused soft plastic. It holds up just fine though to my 13 year old soccer player's kicks. We are all enjoying playing with it and happy with our purchase.


When it comes to soccer ball bladders, you will generally opt for the material that provides the most responsive touch for the highest levels of play. This is because it is a simple matter to re-inflate a soccer ball not to mention the fact that most competitive leagues will have numerous balls on hand. If touch and responsiveness are your key bladder attribute, there is no other material better than latex.

The ultimate determination is how a soccer ball feels and performs for you on contact. A good soccer ball will not only be tough enough to hold up to your fast and furious play, it will feature a soft casing for comfortable heading, and durable stitching (if stitched). It should handle well, and have good response. Most good soccer game balls feature a poly-urethane (PU) casing. Most leagues prefer 32-panel designs for its performance value. Also check for a warranty. Your new soccer ball should come with a manufacturer's warranty against defects and damage caused by normal play.
You just can’t avoid the name of Lionel Messi in the soccer world anymore!  And with this ball, Adidas promises to make you like Messi.  Like the last ball, it has a nylon interior and is machine stitched.  It also has a butyl bladder so that it retains air better.  While this ball is surely a good option, it is a little pricey.  The name alone probably drives it up, but if you’re a Messi fan it may well be worth it to you!  And oh, it also looks like a ball from Pokemon!
Tachikara ball is sold deflated at a reasonable price that is friendly to your pocket. The orange and white size-three ball is made of leather and machine-stitched making it very durable. It is the ideal ball for PE classes, for warm-ups, camps, and recreational play. This new soccer ball with butyl bladder is a great all around youth football ball.
Law 1: The Field of Play Law 2: The Ball Law 3: The Number of Players Law 4: The Players' Equipment Law 5: The Referee Law 6: The Other Match Officials Law 7: The Duration of the Match Law 8: The Start and Restart of Play Law 9: The Ball In and Out of Play Law 10: The Method of Scoring Law 11: Offside Law 12: Fouls and Misconduct Law 13: Free kicks (direct and indirect) Law 14: The Penalty Kick Law 15: The Throw-In Law 16: The Goal Kick Law 17: The Corner Kick

Bouncing a few ideas around on how to improve your game? You might just start with your soccer ball. As we know, the game of soccer involves a lot of fancy footwork, technique, and team work. But what it really comes down to is how well your soccer ball performs for you. Whether you're coaching, playing, or have a child in a soccer league, knowing a little more about the soccer ball, such as how to select one, how to tell a good soccer ball from a cheap one, and how to take care of it, can help you get the most out of yours. And that just might be all you need to kick your season off on the right foot this year.

Teamsportsmania.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com. In addition to that, teamsportsmania.com participates in various other affiliate programs, and we sometimes earn commission against any purchase made through our links.


When a tournament is held (like the FIFA World Cup), the sponsor of the event will design a brand new ball. These are official match balls – they’re used by professionals during real matches. They are designed to the highest possible build quality, have textured surfaces to improve stability in flight, and feature thermally-bonded panels for durability.


I’m playing soccer since I was 10, since 2005. I have also played it before, but I was not so serious as after. At the age of 10, I started to practice it seriously. Now I’m still playing it. During my career, I have tried, changed and played with many different soccer balls. Because I have tested so many of them, I have also created my top best soccer balls which you can see below.
The most modern feature is an embedded NFC chip, which is found on the top of the ball. If you download a free app on iOS or Android, you can personally interact with the ball's exclusive content and location-specific challenges. You'll also be able to participate and enter competitions and World Cup-related challenges. Of course, you can record and upload your experiences for social media posterity.
×