Good soccer games begin and end with your soccer ball! Without the right one, all the slick moves, all the training and team work are not going to make up for points lost by not having the right soccer ball. By understanding the differences between balls, how to select the right ball for you, and how to make the most of your soccer ball can mean all the difference in your game. Reach your soccer goals this season and check out Epic's full line of affordable soccer balls for all ages and abilities.
Our next soccer ball on the list is the DribbleUp Smart Soccer Ball. This ball is the second (and only other) “smart” ball on our list. Like the Adidas brand ball, this DribbleUp ball is designed for use with a smart device and application for training. There are a lot of features to love about this ball; however, it’s more expensive than the Adidas alternative.
Mikasa comes in green, purple, red, and black shades. Besides, there is a size 3, 4 and 5 so you can always buy one depending on your unique needs. It has a one year warranty for your peace of mind. If you’re looking for a new soccer ball to add to your soccer equipment, then the Mikasa Serious Soccer Ball is the right model for you. Moreover, this ball has a deluxe durable cushioned cover stitched with synthetic leather guaranteeing long term use. It has a butyl bladder that ensures maximum air retention thus making it always ready for action.
This is a very special soccer ball which I’ll think you’ll fall in love with. At least that was the case with me. I must say that I don’t normally trust new comers in the industry of soccer equipment. I mostly prefer established companies like Adidas, Select or Brine. However, the guys at Bend-it (the company behind Kunckle-it) really changed my perspective.
A tribute to one of the richest teams in the world, Paris St. Germain, this ball is dressed in their colors.  This is a ball meant for everyday use, so you can get out there and show off your favorite club to everyone.  It is made from polyurethane and has some polyester inside of it, making it slightly different than the Messi ball.  The polyester buttresses the butyl bladder, causing it to retain air and shape.  It is machine stitched and has 26 panels, so it may take a little bit of getting used to the first time.  Like the Messi ball, it comes at a pretty steep price, so it may be a little pricey if you aren’t a PSG fan!
The downside? They’re expensive. Like, really expensive, depending on which one you get. Whether you really need one depends on your budget and how you’re going to be using your ball. For example, I use official match balls for practising freekicks because they fly through the air really nicely. However, I don’t use them for training because if I lose my ball I’ll be set back $100-$300.
NOTE: This article lists and reviews size 5 soccer balls only. You should also know that we are linking out to Amazon and earning a small commission at no extra cost to you from every sale ONLY if you do decide to complete a purchase. This is how we’re able to maintain our website up and running. Nevertheless, we only recommend products or services that we tried, used, like and honestly think may be the best fit for your particular needs.
Elements of the football that today are tested are the deformation of the football when it is kicked or when the ball hits a surface. Two styles of footballs have been tested by the Sports Technology Research Group of Wolfson School of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering in Loughborough University; these two models are called the Basic FE model and the Developed FE model of the football. The basic model considered the ball as being a spherical shell with isotropic material properties. The developed model also utilised isotropic material properties but included an additional stiffer stitching seam region.

Due to it being significantly softer than the other types of rubbers used for soccer ball bladders, latex is generally seen as the premier material. Though, this same perception may not hold as true for practice balls or even game balls at lower levels of competition. This is because latex bladders retain air worse than all of the other soccer ball bladder materials and will need to be re-inflated more often.
Select's attention to detail can be found in the ball's handy work and composition. It comes in nine different colors, including bright orange and bright yellow, which are perfect for training in semi-darkness. The 1.5mm PU cover is hand-stitched and textured for the brighter colors, adding durability. The design also aides turf play by zeroing in on control and resistance.
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