Kelsey is a wife and work from home mommy of two beautiful children. A former medical assistant, Kelsey now focuses on writing and reviewing products to help other work from home mom and dads lives a little easier. She has passion for technology and learning, If you ask Kelsey, the words "A type" and "organized" wouldn’t even begin to describe her.
Our next soccer ball on the list is the DribbleUp Smart Soccer Ball. This ball is the second (and only other) “smart” ball on our list. Like the Adidas brand ball, this DribbleUp ball is designed for use with a smart device and application for training. There are a lot of features to love about this ball; however, it’s more expensive than the Adidas alternative.
Thanks to technology, finding a soccer ball is easy. Simply go online, research on the best balls out there, narrow down your search the top 10, 5 or 3 then read the reviews of people who have actually used them before. Thereafter, you can weigh the pros and cons to determine which ball is the best pick for you. The top 3 places to research on are:

The exclusive design of the exterior hides a football manufactured in specially-developed Japanese TEIJIN microfibre, which makes the ball seem significantly softer than its predecessor. Without compromising on material thickness or adding foam, we have achieved a thoroughly tested feeling of liveliness and lightness – while naturally also preserving the good characteristics such as control and stability that have always characterised a BRILLANT SUPER.The material may be Japanese but BRILLANT SUPER is produced as always by our year-long supplier in Pakistan. The ball is sewn by hand and produced in quality materials from its innermost to its outermost layers. The Zero-Wing bladder ensures that the ball remains in constant balance throughout its flight through the air and a Double-Lock butyl valve ensures that it is practically airtight.​

The inner lining and the bladder are some of the key components of a soccer ball’s construction. These components are the factors that give control to the shape and the feel of a soccer ball. The usual match soccer ball has four layers of a blended polyester and cotton material in its lining, while mid-range ones have two cotton and polyester layers.


Differing from competing balls that utilize plastic, the deluxe cushioned cover of the Mikasa Serious Soccer Ball is made of synthetic leather. This soft, durable material is exponentially easier on the shins and foreheads of players used to batting the ball around regularly. The leather is forgiving in its impact, allowing passes and shooting to be crisper off of the athlete’s foot.
The exclusive design of the exterior hides a football manufactured in specially-developed Japanese TEIJIN microfibre, which makes the ball seem significantly softer than its predecessor. Without compromising on material thickness or adding foam, we have achieved a thoroughly tested feeling of liveliness and lightness – while naturally also preserving the good characteristics such as control and stability that have always characterised a BRILLANT SUPER.The material may be Japanese but BRILLANT SUPER is produced as always by our year-long supplier in Pakistan. The ball is sewn by hand and produced in quality materials from its innermost to its outermost layers. The Zero-Wing bladder ensures that the ball remains in constant balance throughout its flight through the air and a Double-Lock butyl valve ensures that it is practically airtight.​
Despite having so many good reviews from the users, why aren’t we keeping Wilson traditional ball on our list? It is because we strongly think Wilson is specialized in making tennis equipment. On the other hand, this model did not meet our expectation. This model seems too heavy to us, and overall feel was not too good. That is why we are not recommending you to go for this option. But obviously, the final decision is yours. So many people are still buying this 🙂
Crafted by Adidas, the Telstar 18 is the official ball of the FIFA World Cup. Drawing inspiration from the company's first World Cup match ball, which debuted at the 1970 tournament in Mexico, the new ball reimagines the 12 black panels on an otherwise white design. Fun fact: the iconic original black and white ball was made that way to be more visible for black-and-white TV viewers, and it was dubbed the "star of television."
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