If you've ever noticed, a traditional soccer ball resembles a geodesic dome building. Such as the one designed by architect, Richard Buckminster Fuller. Thus the ball became called the Buckminster Ball. Or more simply, the "Buckeyball". The design is characterized by a pattern of twenty hexagon pieces, and twelve pentagon pieces, fitted together to create a perfect sphere. The soccer ball has undergone many design changes of various-shaped panels stitched together. But until the geodesic dome-like ball, it was never quite round enough to perform right. Manufacturers settled upon the modern thirty-two panel design, which enables the ball to roll and spin more evenly and smoothly. Which is probably why it's the most popular competition soccer ball on the market today. The Buckminister-style soccer ball was first sold in the 1950s, and debuted in the 1970 World Cup tournament.


The ball has good texture. It seems to hold air pretty well. The design is cool and is definitely one that is not seen on the pitch or practice field normally. I only have concern that a few of the patches on the ball are not flush with the others. 2 of the small panels are a little raised than the others where the seems meet. When my son and I pass the ball on a perfect synthetic field, it seems to jump just slightly, but it could be in my head since I have seen the seems not level to each other in a few spots on the ball. Mine may be abnormal. Other than that, the ball seems very well made. It even makes the right noises when kicked hard. Overall pretty satisfied.
Many stores have a very large selection of soccer balls. How do I pick out the best ball for my money?  First know what type of soccer ball is best for your needs and how much you want to spend.  Also, research what materials make up the best soccer balls.  Of course you can use Soccer Ball World as a buying guide. Our store has four balls to meet most players needs from professional to practice soccer balls.
Our main intention of discussing the different types of balls is to educate you so that you can buy the right product. For example using practice balls on the street will bring you no good but some awful experiences as the ball will not last long. Similarly, an indoor soccer ball is not good to play on a beach. Keep this in mind when buying, and using a ball.

A quick inspection of the construction of the ball might help you make a quick decision. The first thing that you should look at is the panel of the ball. A soccer ball that has panels sewn together is a better choice than the ones that are glued together. The panels of a premium ball are stitched by hand while those of a lower quality are machine stitched.


For the most part, soccer balls are pretty affordable. Training soccer balls for kids start at under $10, and for around $60 or less, you can get a good, league-approved tournament soccer ball. Of course there are more expensive ones, depending on what you're looking for. Cost depends on the type of ball, materials, quality, and also the outlet you buy from. Our soccer balls can be bought economically in sets of six or more, or singly. Shopping online at Epic Sports can save you up to 60 percent if not more off retail prices on your favorite brands.
This is a decision that your coach or manager get to decide for you if you are part of a team. Your own ball is one thing that you have control on. However, when it comes to what the team should play with, it is the manager’s job to pick which ball is the best, and what is appropriate for the team for training. Coaches usually stick to training match balls as they give the illusion of actual match balls.
Finding the best soccer ball is important. You don’t use a ball only once and you keep on pushing and stepping on it all the time. Your typical soccer ball is not something that you usually handle with care and attention. So you need to buy something reliable that will not get cut with frequent use. At the same time, you need something that comes in the right size, weight and feel. When the ball is too heavy or too light you will not be able to use it properly.
Why do I always have to pump up even expensive balls? Many balls use bladders made out of latex. Natural Latex Rubber bladders offer the softest feel and response, but do not provide the best air retention. Micro pores slowly let air escape. Balls with natural rubber bladders need to be re-inflated more often than balls with butyl bladders. Even after one or two days, the latex bladder will leak enough air so that you will have to inflate the ball back to recommended pressure. Some balls use carbon-latex bladders in which the carbon powder helps to close the micro pores. Soccer balls with carbon latex bladders usually increase air retention to approximately one week. Of course, check the ball for punctures that may cause the air to leak out.

This soccer ball was purchased as a birthday gift for an 8 year old boy. He loves to play soccer and was thrilled to get this ball. However, as it comes deflated in a mostly plain white box - no pictures and no real description of what's inside, we inflated the ball and wrote a description ourselves. There was no printed info inside the box either, except for instructions in very tiny print on how to change the batteries. Nowhere were the size of the batteries identified! So, I was not happy with the packaging of this ball as a gift. However, the ball itself seemed to be of good quality and lit up easily when dropped or kicked and was a real "kid-pleaser". So overall, the product was good, but the packaging could be improved.

My friend and I were kicking a soccer ball around the front yard. It was maybe 2007 and I was getting ready to leave for a couple weeks on a trial. Trying to be cute, I tried a handling skill where I flipped the ball up behind my back and then kick it with my heel so it comes back over my head again. So I kicked the ball too hard, it goes out into the street, and a truck promptly runs it over.

Inflate soccer balls to the pressure of 6-8 PPI (pounds per square inch). A pressure gauge will tell you when the air is enough. Under or over-inflating a soccer ball will shorten its life in one way or another. When under-inflated, the ball will not be resistant to the impact of kicks. On the other hand, over inflation will stretch out the bladder and put pressure on the panel stitches.

I purchased the Knuckle It Pro soccer ball for my sons 12 th birthday in August of 2017. When I asked what he would like for his birthday he had mentioned this ball. I had never heard of it so I began doing research on the product. We had at least 4 soccer balls at home at the time so I wasn't sure I'd go with another ball. We have one of nearly every major brand ranging in price from $15-30. He had even received a $40 ball just months before for Christmas so I really didn't see the point in one more.
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If you're headed to the park to play a quick pickup game, brightly colored adidas soccer balls can help make it easy to distinguish your match from other games that might be being played nearby. Dribbling skills conducted with mini Nike soccer balls can hone your control skills, so you can glide past defenders with ease. Look for 12-panel soccer balls that provide a true, accurate flight with each strike, and rubber butyl bladders that offer excellent shape and air retention, so you can quickly jump into a game without looking for a pump. If you prefer playing indoors, check out a futsal ball that's slightly smaller than regulation soccer balls and is designed for use on hard indoor courts.
The downside? They’re expensive. Like, really expensive, depending on which one you get. Whether you really need one depends on your budget and how you’re going to be using your ball. For example, I use official match balls for practising freekicks because they fly through the air really nicely. However, I don’t use them for training because if I lose my ball I’ll be set back $100-$300.

This match ball is an updated version of the popular Nike Ordem Professional soccer ball. Its goal is to withstand high-level play. A fuse-welded synthetic leather casing is optimal for touch and response. It also has a restricted six-wing carbon latex bladder for maximum air retention and explosiveness. The wrapped bladder also gives it a perfectly round shape, touch, and bounce. High contrast graphic design creates better visibility for this match soccer ball. Overall, this official match soccer ball boasts of 40% synthetic leather, 30% rubber, 20% polyester, and 10% cotton.
Of course, no one should truly expect this ball to be made for an organized league game since its primary selling point is that it glows in the dark. This soccer ball features two red LED lights that are powered by the same kinds of batteries used for watches. Even better, the batteries themselves are easy to change out and even have a specialized tool to assist in doing so. To prevent the batteries from running out too quickly, the ball is kick-activated and stays lit for 40 seconds.
If you love Adidas products and are looking for a new soccer ball at an affordable price, then the Ace Glider II would be the ideal product to add to your soccer equipment. It is part of ACE soccer collection and is the best football ball for your daily practice and drills. The ball is made of unique TPU material that will resist abrasion while the machine-stitched design and nylon wound carcass ensures durability and long-lasting performance. It has a butyl bladder for air retention while equally ensuring the ball remains in perfect shape throughout your training session without deflating.
The second edition of the new dual bonded production method is the Target DB. This new ball is both machine-stiched and sealed with glue. The contstruction consists of a PU-material laminated with 3.5 mm foam. Two layers of textile underlining are them laminated to the foam layers to add stability. Finally, the panels are 3D printed with a 3mm edge glue and stitched together. The glue is activated in the heat mold to hide the stitches and the seam sealing is done by hand. By using glue in the sealing of the seams, the water uptake is reduced significantly.The bladder inside is a SR-bladder with excellent air retention. The result is a soccer ball with both stability, control and a softer touch compared to other balls in the range.
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