Wilson is a great supplier for high schools and colleges, much like Select, and this ball will continue that legacy.  Its fused panel and new “hybrid” technology help lower the amount of water that enters the ball, thus allowing it to be much more durable.  It claims to have 32 “premium” panels that give you a flight that you can control and predict as well as equal airflow throughout its surface.  It is also a highly visible orange, so it will turn a few heads.  Combine that with a very reasonable price, and this is an overall great soccer ball for student-athletes.
While the ball features high-quality materials, the focus with this ball is all the smart features and less about the physical make-up of the ball, which doesn’t come in handy when you’re researching! What I did find with this ball is that it’s match quality and built to last. It’s also available in sizes 4 or 5 for multiple ages and training levels.

However, by selling out so hard in terms of responsiveness, the Mikasa has painted itself into a bit of a corner. Specifically, the synthetic leather casing makes this ball unsuitable for use on any surface outside of natural grass.In fact, even artificial grass will begin to wear down this ball once the glossy finish has been worn away. When you factor in the machine stitching, you end up with one of the least durable soccer balls on our list.
Built for durability, recreation balls are made of soft synthetic materials for play on nearly any field. Typically, these balls are slightly heavier for beginner’s slower play, yet, competitors of all skill levels use these balls for practice and recreation on hard turf fields due to their resilience. Machine-stitching is the most stand-out visual difference between match balls and training balls and it offers a consistent touch for any player.
It is also a good idea to clean your soccer ball after you have finished using it. Although regularly cleaning a soccer ball can be a time-consuming chore, it will extend the life of the ball’s cover. The grit, dirt, and debris that the ball can pick up on any pitch impacts the panels and stitching with every rotation. So clean it thoroughly and then allow it to dry for the best possible results.
This ball has been through all of the hazards that kids can dream up. Dribbling the ball on pavement walking to the car, practicing shots against a brick school, being used as a seat, heavy use at practice, and its frequent selection as the game ball. With all of that, it still looks great with very little wear and tear. Could still pass as a new ball from a few feet away. It's held it's pressure very well. The outer shell texture allows good grip without being to soft or too hard.
Sizing is very important in selecting a soccer ball.  For the purposes of this article, I will mostly concentrate on size 5 outdoor soccer balls, but I will quickly go over the various sizes and let you know what they are used for.  Size 1 soccer balls, or skill balls (also known as mini balls), are primarily used by youth players that are just being introduced to the game.  These are typically 1-3-year-olds.  Another use for Size 1 balls is for older players to learn to juggle.  It is much harder to juggle a size 1, so instead of using a hacky sack, they use a skill ball.  This is done because the texture and materials are similar.  Size 3 balls are slightly bigger than size 1 and are used for ages four through seven.  They do this so that the ball isn’t too big in comparison to the players.  Size 4 balls are used for age eight through eleven.  Size 4s are smaller than size 5, which is used for everyone past the age of eleven.  This is the same size that the professionals use.  Making sure that you have the proper ball is just as important as picking out which materials one has.
1. The 2018 FIFA World Cup in Russia stole the attention of soccer fans around the globe this summer and the tournaments official ball, the adidas Telstar 18 World Cup Official Match Soccer Ball, ran away with the title ‘Best Selling Soccer Ball of 2018.’ (We don’t see any ball catching it over the next months). The ball was inspired by the famous Telstar ball that debuted at the 1970 FIFA World Cup in Mexico and released in November 2017. The design drew some criticism from fans but once on the field it lived up to its namesake in looks and performance.

As a response to the problems with the balls in the 1962 FIFA World Cup, Adidas created the Adidas Santiago[17] – this led to Adidas winning the contract to supply the match balls for all official FIFA and UEFA matches, which they have held since the 1970s, and also for the Olympic Games.[18] They also supply the ball for the UEFA Champions League which is called the Adidas Finale.
Wilson is a great supplier for high schools and colleges, much like Select, and this ball will continue that legacy.  Its fused panel and new “hybrid” technology help lower the amount of water that enters the ball, thus allowing it to be much more durable.  It claims to have 32 “premium” panels that give you a flight that you can control and predict as well as equal airflow throughout its surface.  It is also a highly visible orange, so it will turn a few heads.  Combine that with a very reasonable price, and this is an overall great soccer ball for student-athletes.
Adidas says its design was motivated by Russia's urban landscapes. It uses textured graphics and a metallic sheen to bring a modern look to the classic design. The ball is made of six panels of thermally bonded TPU and about 15% silicone. The materials allow for better trajectory, accuracy, responsiveness, and low water absorption. It also feels well-padded and slightly lighter than previous match balls.
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